Microsoft: 400 million Windows 7 and 100 million Office 2010 licenses sold (and more partner conference stats)

Summary:Microsoft's Day 1 keynote from the Worldwide Partner Conference in Los Angeles didn't feature much product news. But there were a lot of stats thrown at the 12,000 or so partners in attendance on July 11.

Microsoft's Day 1 keynote from the Worldwide Partner Conference in Los Angeles didn't feature much product news. But there were a lot of stats thrown at the 12,000 or so partners in attendance on July 11.

I've rounded up the claims from CEO Steve Ballmer, Windows/Windows Live CFO Tammi Reller and Partner Chief Jon Roskill here:

400,000,000: The number of Windows 7 licenses sold to date

100,000,000: The number of Office 2010 licenses sold to date 50,000: The number of businesses that have tried Office 365 (via its trial program) in the past two weeks 41,000: The number of Microsoft partners now who identify themselves primarily as cloud partners 1,000: The number of days until Microsoft stops supporting Windows XP (Note: end of support doesn't mean users can't still run the product)

76: The percentage of servers that ship with Windows on them

62: Number of days until the third Microsoft-sanctioned disclosure about Windows 8 at the Build conference

36: Number of times Reller said "Windows 8" during her keynote remarks (without actually sharing anything new about the coming OS)

8.70: The amount Microsoft partners make for every $1.00 that Microsoft makes.

2: The number of public updates Microsoft has provided about Windows 8 (CES 2011 in January and AllThingsD/Computex in June)

"Transition" was the key word for me at the partner conference this morning. Microsoft is attempting to get partners to transition to the cloud more quickly. Company officials are working to transition from viewing technologies like Bing and Xbox as consumer-only technologies and think about how they might be able to be used for business. And Microsoft is seeking a way to help partners transition from Windows 7 to Window 8 without having the bottom drop out of the Windows 7 market.

Just as they did with Vista when Windows 7 was on the horizon, MIcrosoft execs are emphasizing to partners that there's still life left in the current version of Windows, in spite of all the interest about Windows 8. Microsoft's guidance is to get partners to sell customers on moving to Windows 7, IE 9 and Office 2010 now to ease their transition to Windows 8, IE 10 and Office 15. It's tough to be between product cycles, as the Softies are right now with Windows and Office, but that's where things are right now....

More from Microsoft Partner Conference:

Windows 8 will run on all Windows 7 PCs (and Vista PCs too)

Microsoft: In a year, Windows Phone has gone from very small to ... very small

Microsoft makes it official: New beta of Windows Intune 2.0 available

Third test build of Microsoft's SQL Server 'Denali' expected this week

What's on Steve Ballmer's Microsoft priority list now?

Microsoft to deliver Surface 2.0 software developer kit on July 12

Why Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer is so bullish on Bing

Microsoft to deliver Surface 2.0 software developer kit on July 12

Topics: Operating Systems, Microsoft, Software, Windows

About

Mary Jo Foley has covered the tech industry for 30 years for a variety of publications, including ZDNet, eWeek and Baseline. She is the author of Microsoft 2.0: How Microsoft plans to stay relevant in the post-Gates era (John Wiley & Sons, 2008). She also is the cohost of the "Windows Weekly" podcast on the TWiT network. Got a tip? Se... Full Bio

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