Microsoft acquires rootkit specialist Komoku; DoD now a customer

Summary:Microsoft on Thursday acquired Komoku, which provides rootkit detection software, for an undisclosed sum. Komoku's technology will be added to Microsoft's enterprise-focused Forefront and Windows Live OneCare security software.

Microsoft on Thursday acquired Komoku, which provides rootkit detection software, for an undisclosed sum. Komoku's technology will be added to Microsoft's enterprise-focused Forefront and Windows Live OneCare security software.

Komoku counts the Department of Homeland Security and the Department of Defense as customers and gives Microsoft's anti-malware lineup a boost.

The startup was founded in 2004 and funded by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) with about $2.5 million. Komoku's technology trolls for any operating system abnormalities that could be tied to rootkits and collects forensic evidence.

Also see: Microsoft inches toward public beta of ‘Stirling’ security suite

The deal is a good one for Microsoft. In one swoop, Microsoft acquires some high profile security customers in the U.S. government.

William Arbaugh, an expert on rootkits and CTO at Komoku, said in a statement that the majority of Komoku's staff will join Microsoft's Access and Security Division. The company's product line will be absorbed into Microsoft.

More background on Komoku:

Topics: Microsoft, Security

About

Larry Dignan is Editor in Chief of ZDNet and SmartPlanet as well as Editorial Director of ZDNet's sister site TechRepublic. He was most recently Executive Editor of News and Blogs at ZDNet. Prior to that he was executive news editor at eWeek and news editor at Baseline. He also served as the East Coast news editor and finance editor at CN... Full Bio

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