Microsoft cuts Vista prices by 10 percent

Summary:Businesses buying additional copies of Vista will receive the discount from today

Microsoft has announced 10 percent discounts for UK small businesses and home users wishing to purchase additional licences for Vista.

Nick White, product manager on the Vista launch team, revealed the extension to Europe of the Windows Vista Additional License programme in his in his blog. The programme allows small businesses and home users to install the same edition of Windows Vista on additional computers, once they have purchased the operating system. Customers can purchase up to five additional licences at 10 percent off the suggested retail price.

However, comments posted on White's blog show some users have not welcomed the move by Microsoft, with many people finding the operating system too expensive.

One UK-based reader of White's blog said: "I'm willing to give Vista a go. Only, however, if the family discount is extended to the UK in June when the current limited time (US only) offer expires. Otherwise it's way too damned expensive for the three PCs I have. Ten percent per additional licence is just not enough of a 'sweet deal' for me." Family discount, which enables people purchasing Windows Vista Ultimate to buy two additional licences for $49.99 in the US, is not currently available in the UK.

Another reader pointed out that many US retailers already offer Vista at 10 percent below list price. "Honestly, it leaves much to be desired (and I speak not as a Linux or Apple zealot), especially as you can easily find Vista discounted by 5-7 percent at Amazon.com or marked down by about that much at [US] retail stores like Best Buy. Ten percent isn't worth it unless you are completely incapable of comparison shopping, or you live 100 miles from the nearest computer store and you're on metered dial-up," said the reader.

The Windows Vista Additional License programme is available online in the UK from Monday.

Topics: Operating Systems

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Tom is a technology reporter for ZDNet.com, writing about all manner of security and open-source issues.Tom had various jobs after leaving university, including working for a company that hired out computers as props for films and television, and a role turning the entire back catalogue of a publisher into e-books.Tom eventually found tha... Full Bio

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