Microsoft fixes critical Windows 8, IE10 flaws for Patch Tuesday

Summary:Put a pot of coffee on, it's Patch Tuesday. Microsoft today released five critical patches that fix vulnerabilities in Windows 8 devices, including Surface tablets, and Internet Explorer 10.

Microsoft has released five critical security updates for Windows 8 and Windows RT in order to protect against a range of vulnerabilities identified in the recently released software.

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All in all, there are seven updates for Windows users, with five rated "critical" that could lead to remote code execution, while two are rated "important," which fix flaws that could result in the operating system's security features being bypassed.

Critical updates are generally those that could compromise the security of a device or system data, while important updates are reserved for those that could lead to an increased scope of attack by malware or hackers.

Surface RT owners will also be asked to update their tablets with the latest security patches. According to Microsoft, there are two "critical" fixes for Surface RT owners.

One of the "critical" patches will plug a security hole in Internet Explorer 10, which is found only on Windows 8 and Windows RT, which will resolve three reported vulnerabilities in the browser that could allow remote code execution on the device from "specially crafted" Web pages.

Another "critical" patch will update Microsoft's email server, Exchange, which will prevent a weakness in the server's WebReady Document Viewing feature.

Other platforms that are covered under this month's bevy of security patches include Windows XP, Windows Server 2003, Windows Vista, Windows Server 2008, Windows 7, Windows Server 2008 R2, and the latest server offering, Windows Server 2012.

Updates are available on Windows Update, Microsoft Update, and the usual channels for Windows Server customers. 

Topics: Security, Windows, Windows Server

About

Zack Whittaker writes for ZDNet, CNET, and CBS News. He is based in New York City.

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