M'sian pirates shrug off ban, offer home delivery

Ingenuity knows no bounds. After an announcement of a ban on street sales of VCDs and CDs, some Malaysian traders now plan to introduce phone-in and home delivery services.

KUALA LUMPUR--Ingenuity knows no bounds. After an announcement of a ban on street sales of VCDs and CDs, some traders now plan to introduce phone-in and home delivery services.

The ban was proposed by the government's anti-piracy unit to curb pornography. Officials say about 70 percent of 5,000-odd licensed traders deal in pornography and pirated VCDs and CDs.

The New Straits Times said some traders had distributed business cards to regular customers to enable them to place their orders.

"It's simple. They now know my telephone number and they can place their orders or find out the latest movies and have them sent directly to their homes," it quoted a trader as saying.

The trader, who declined to be named, said such service would cost her slightly more but she had no choice as she had to clear her stock.

Another unidentified VCD trader, who has been trading in pirated discs and cassettes at a flea-market for about 10 years, told the newspaper that he would give his email address to regular clients.

"We have to continue to earn a living," he added.

A pirated VCD can be obtained at night markets and roadside stalls for around RM5, compared to some RM40 for an original.

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