Nokia Lumia is pitch perfect for 20 somethings

The fact that Nokia has delivered exactly what it needs to in order to succeed in selling lots of Windows Phone handsets everywhere except the US) and - apart from an intriguing hint about contextual services - not a ringtone more isn't a bad thing. In fact it's a very smart business decision; investing in overly complicated, overly expensive handsets isn't the way to make money or gain market share - just attention in gadget blogs.

The fact that Nokia has delivered exactly what it needs to in order to succeed in selling lots of Windows Phone handsets everywhere except the US) and - apart from an intriguing hint about contextual services - not a ringtone more isn't a bad thing. In fact it's a very smart business decision; investing in overly complicated, overly expensive handsets isn't the way to make money or gain market share - just attention in gadget blogs. My main complaint is that my signature lime green is only available in the S40 devices aimed at developing countries, but for the socially oriented, affluent but aspiring 25 year old that Nokia is advertising the Lumias too, they're pitch perfect. Mango is a nice operating system with an interface that ranges from functional to charming, with more apps than BlackBerry - including the all-important Angry Birds, as well as working as an Xbox controller. It's a Facebook phone that isn't as naff as most phones labelled as such. Nokia has filled in the biggest missing app - turn by turn voice navigation - with the free Nokia Drive (download maps a country or state at a time in advance or on demand as you travel, depending on how expensive your roaming data is). And Nokia Music mix radio is exactly what casual listeners want, free music you can just turn on and listen to and download for later, with the option to pick and choose tracks to buy well - the sort of streaming service you might pay a fiver a month for on other handsets (like the far more powerful but not free Pure Music service for iPhone, Android and Pure radios announced this week).

The fact that the Windows Phone Lync client for Office 365 is still coming soon (maybe by the November launch of the Lumia 710 but there's no official date) and that distribution of enterprise apps goes through the consumer Windows Phone Marketplace (giving BlackBerry a big advantage with distribution through BES by policy) isn't a problem either for Microsoft or businesses - and it won't be until Nokia sells a few million phones to 20-somethings who start bringing them to work and clamouring for IT to support them. As you'd expect, Windows Phone has excellent support for Exchange and SharePoint, including IRM for email and documents and management from Exchange or Office 365. It has probably the best mobile Office client, as you'd expect. What it doesn't have is hardware encryption, but then neither do Android handsets or anything older than iPhone 3GS.

Brightly coloured, beautifully made and bang on target, the Lumias are exactly what Microsoft asked for and they're backed by Nokia's ability to shift phones (12 a second in developing countries) and to talk operators into setting sensible prices (like free on a £31 a month contract with more data than the iPhone 4S contracts). That's a pretty good target to hit in 8 months, especially for a company like Nokia that could argue for a year over the size of its logo on new handsets.

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