NYT: China Counters Google position. Partners begin divorce proceedings

The New York Times reports that two major mobile phone partners are breaking ties with Google. As the government clamps down on Google, more Chinese companies are severing partnership deals.

Special Report: Google-China

The New York Times reports that two major mobile phone partners are breaking ties with Google. As the government clamps down on Google, more Chinese companies are severing partnership deals.  The government has also broken several network connections that redirect Google's .cn domain to .hk site in Hong Kong.

China's biggest cellular communications company, China Mobile, was expected to cancel a deal that had placed Google's search engine on its mobile Internet home page, used by millions of people daily. In interviews, business executives close to industry officials said the company was planning to scrap the deal under government pressure, despite the fact that China Mobile has yet to contract with a replacement.

Similarly, China's second-largest mobile company, China Unicom, was said by analysts and others to have delayed or killed the imminent introduction of a cellphone based on Google's Android platform. One major Internet portal, Tom.com, already had ceased using Google to power its search engine.

As Google continues  into unknown territory, it will face pressure to adhere to Chinese law (right now) or leave completely - including Hong Kong. There's no faster way to anger the Chinese leadership than continuing to argue in public why Google believes its policies are in the public interests. The marriage didn't last long. Even the prenuptial is being torn up. This is going to be an ugly and very celebrity style public divorce.

Additional resources:

Google lays down China gauntlet of its own making. Living by the sword...

Google wants R&D and sales to stay in China - but is that realistic?

Copenhagen: It's all about trade, not global warming, and China is the target

Commerce Secretary: Patent delays are a scandal

Google on the defensive, vulnerable; China risks international and U.S. response

China's Internet policy begins new arms race

U.S. arms sale to Taiwan may throw Google negotiations in China out the window

Why China, U.S., Canada, U.K, Australia, New Zealand all block internet content

Nokia burned by EU for assisting Iran with monitoring technology

Apple, Facebook, Twitter, HP decline to testify re: Human Rights and Law

China: Google has never officially complained about attack

US Trade Rep unsure if legal options exist to negotiate China Internet restriction

Sec. Clinton releases global Human Rights Report: China and Iran Internet Freedom highlighted

Newsletters

You have been successfully signed up. To sign up for more newsletters or to manage your account, visit the Newsletter Subscription Center.
See All
See All