Oracle plots Exadata as a cloud service at OpenWorld

CTO Larry Ellison says Exadata as a service will provide a cloud option that can mesh with on-premise deployments and appear as one computing pool to enterprises.

Oracle plans to launch its Exadata technology as a service at its OpenWorld customer powwow in late October.

Larry Ellison, Oracle's technology chief, told analysts the company's plans for Exadata in the cloud on Wednesday.

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The gist is that Exadata as a service will take the technology that's optimized for Oracle's database and deliver it as a service. The goal is to allow enterprises to mix and match Exadata on-premise and cloud deployments and manage them as one asset pool.

Ellison said:

We have Exadata as a Service that we're rolling out at Oracle Open World. So we have Exadata as a Service in our cloud. And we obviously sell Exadata machines to run on premise, the most modern way, the most cost effective way to run our database. So you can run part of your database work load on-prem, on that Exadata platform, part of that database workload in our cloud on that Exadata platform. And our management tool, when you're running your data center assets and our cloud assets, the person whose running that thinks that that's one pool of assets. It's one set of management tools that allow you to run your Exadata and the Exadata that's in the cloud together and move data and workloads back and forth.

Ellison said there will be a long period of co-existence between cloud and on-premise computing and engineered systems such as Exadata and Exalogic will have to have "absolute compatibility" between the two.

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