PC makers plead with China for release from Youth Escort

True to form, having figured out the wind is blowing strongly against Green Dam - Youth Escort (the censorware that China had ordered PC makers to install before selling computers in the country), the tech industry has now lent its name to a tepid letter of protest to the Chinese Ministry of Industry.According to the Wall Street Journal, the U.

True to form, having figured out the wind is blowing strongly against Green Dam - Youth Escort (the censorware that China had ordered PC makers to install before selling computers in the country), the tech industry has now lent its name to a tepid letter of protest to the Chinese Ministry of Industry. According to the Wall Street Journal, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, the National Association of Manufacturers, the National Foreign Trade Council and the Semiconductor Industry Association and international groups as well, sent a letter to Minister Li Yizhong:

The plan "raises significant questions of security, privacy, system reliability, the free flow of information and user choice. We urge the Chinese government to reconsider implementing the requirements."

But of course we'll do whatever you say.

Meanwhile, CyberSitter developer Solid Oak has sent cease and desist letters to Dell and HP to stop them from installing the software, which it alleges is lifted wholesale from the Solid Oak data files and code.

And China has backed off of Youth Escort somewhat, saying its "not compulsory" for Chinese users to install the software (if indeed they ever said that), but it's still insisting PC makers pre-install the software, AP reports.

That July 1 deadline is growing close.

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