Project not Print

The whole point of a visual presentation is that it is suppose to make an impression and convey information in a memorable way that sticks with the audience. Sure, sometimes you need a printed copy for back-up or follow-up, but that should be considered the exception, not the norm.

Doc gets a little frustrated sometimes when people think of PowerPoint as something you use to create print documents. Over and over again I go to presentations where a hard copy is handed out, regardless of whether it's needed or not. And, in many cases, the presentations are so poorly done and so dense with information that you actually need the printed copy to make any sense of it.

The whole point of a visual presentation is that it is suppose to make an impression and convey information in a memorable way that sticks with the audience. Sure, sometimes you need a printed copy for back-up or follow-up, but that should be considered the exception, not the norm. If you need someone to have a printed copy of your presentation so they can “follow along,” you've designed a very poor presentation and should go back to the drawing board. If you are doing a presentation on a screen, then you want people's attention on the screen, not on the printed presentation.

Of course, if you want to make a good visual impression, you need good quality projection. There are a lot of good projectors out there and they seem to be getting smaller and smaller. It's to the point now where you can carry a quality projector with you when you go to meetings, so there's no excuse and no fumbling with unfamiliar equipment.

For one good source of projectors, check out the latest news from our esteemed sponsor, Ricoh, who is a relative newcomer to the advanced projector market.

And please, if you are going to use PowerPoint, please don't act like it's Microsoft Word.

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