Researchers hack toys, iPhone

Researchers at the ToorCon security conference in San Diego have shown how easy it can be to poke holes in software and hardware with the right tools, know-how and curiosity.

Researchers at the ToorCon security conference in San Diego have shown how easy it can be to poke holes in software and hardware with the right tools, know-how and curiosity.

From 'weaponized' iPhone software to hacked toys and leaked cookies, the conference displayed some of the myriad ways in which businesses and consumers can be exposed to security threats. One researcher demonstrated how to take control of an iPhone using an exploit that targets a hole in Safari, which has now been patched. The iPhone had an app installed that allowed it to process credit-card numbers, which could then be stolen.

Two researchers gave a light-hearted talk, entitled 'Real Men Carry Pink Pagers', about how they turned a toy into a wireless tool that could be used to open garage doors and clone RFID tags used for inventory control on shipping docks and RFID-based passports, among other uses. The pink plastic IM-Me device, with a 'Girl Tech' brand on it, was designed to allow young girls to send instant messages with friends on a private network.

For more on this story, read Researchers hack toys, attack iPhones at ToorCon on CNET News.

Newsletters

You have been successfully signed up. To sign up for more newsletters or to manage your account, visit the Newsletter Subscription Center.
See All
See All