The History of the iPhone gets animated

Our Tech Family Tree — History of the iPhone has been out now for just over a week and unlike the iPhone 4 we've been delighted by its reception.The best bit has been doling out the posters at various events — Jack Clark managed to donate a couple at the Intel Developer Forum to passing execs, while I've been peppering the occasional freebie around London — and seeing people get caught up in this or that bit of information which fires their interest.

Our Tech Family Tree — History of the iPhone has been out now for just over a week and unlike the iPhone 4 we've been delighted by its reception.

The best bit has been doling out the posters at various events — Jack Clark managed to donate a couple at the Intel Developer Forum to passing execs, while I've been peppering the occasional freebie around London — and seeing people get caught up in this or that bit of information which fires their interest.

(We did send one to Stephen Fry; his PA assures us he'll love it, but oh, here's hoping that he says so. What could make a crew of tech hacks happier?)

But as you know, we're all about the business side of tech. Our comrades in gadgets over at CNet UK like to think of themselves as funkier, more hip, daddy-o, than us purposeful perusers of proper technology. So they've come up with their own version of the History of the iPhone which looks, and to all intents is, like a Hoxton-tinged, Royksoppesque music video.

It's very splendid, and if you saw it on Top Of The Pops (if TOTP still existed) or MTV (if MTV still did music), you'd think it perfectly in place. And it takes no liberties with the truth. Even we pernickety pedants can find little to complain about (*), and plenty to get both brain and booty bouncing in Apple-flavoured joy.

So go have a look. Then come back and admire our TFT. And ask yourself — what will they come up with next?

(*) Although not quite nothing. The geography of San Francisco is a bit wonky, and the depiction of the first four nodes of the Arpanet have CRT monitors, at a time when teletypes were the standard interface. Hey, you did ask.

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