The Internet makes short list for 2010 Nobel Peace Prize nominees

A lot of people were surprised and buzzing last year when it was announced President Obama won the Nobel Peace Prize. And now to keep everyone guessing and talking, the Internet has made it to the short list of nominees for the 2010 Nobel Peace Prize. No, seriously.

A lot of people were surprised and buzzing last year when it was announced President Obama won the Nobel Peace Prize. And now to keep everyone guessing and talking, the Internet has made it to the short list of nominees for the 2010 Nobel Peace Prize.

According to the AP/Forbes, the Internet drew backing after a petition got started by Wired Italy. As reported by Wired in the US, the mag's publishers says the world wide web can be "destroy hate and conflict and to propagate peace and democracy." Citing the use of Twitter in Iran, supporters says the power of the Internet "outweighs any negative use of the international network."

The competition? Russian activist Svetlana Gannushkina and her human rights group, Memorial, plus recently-jailed Liu Xiaobo, a Chinese dissident imprisoned for his leadership in movements for human rights and freedom of expression. (Apparently, China's government asked the jury to "disregard the submission." Are they cheering for the Internet? What about Google?)

The arguments for the Internet, as being a revolutionary and changing force around the world, are compelling. And given the unpredictability of the Nobel Prize selection committee and their lack of interest in what people think of their decisions, the Internet could very well win.

But should the interwebs wins, what kind of acceptance speech can the Internet provide? And who will accept on its behalf?

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