Toshiba unveils 'world's first' 3D flatpanel that doesn't require glasses

Summary:Toshiba unveiled another "world's first" gadget today at CEATEC 2010 in Tokyo, and this one is a biggie: a 3D flatpanel TV that doesn't require any glasses to fully enjoy the picture.

Toshiba unveiled another "world's first" gadget today at CEATEC 2010 in Tokyo, and this one is a biggie: a 3D flatpanel TV that doesn't require any glasses to fully enjoy the picture.

Intended for commercial sale, the 3D flatpanel will be available in 12- and 20-inch sizes.

These advanced 3D displays sans glasses were made possible thanks to an integral imaging system. Here's the explanation:

It provides nine different perspectives (parallaxes) of each single 2D frame which the viewer’s brain superimposes to create a 3-dimensional impression of the image...They developed a powerful engine and an algorithm to extrapolate these perspectives out of the 2D frame and used a perpendicular lenticular sheet, an array of lenses, that enable the viewer’s brain to superimpose the perspectives. It also offers a wide viewing area in front of the display and allows movement of the eyes and head without disrupting the 3D image and without the discomfort sometimes associated with other ‘glasses-less’ 3D technologies.

Naturally, these way cool products will be available in Japan only first when the 3D flatpanels launch in December. No word on when the Toshiba displays will roll out elsewhere.

Topics: Toshiba

About

Rachel King is a staff writer for CBS Interactive based in San Francisco, covering business and enterprise technology for ZDNet, CNET and SmartPlanet. She has previously worked for The Business Insider, FastCompany.com, CNN's San Francisco bureau and the U.S. Department of State. Rachel has also written for MainStreet.com, Irish Americ... Full Bio

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