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Twitter's timeline showing tweets out of order could launch next week

The current 'While you were away' feature will become standard on the new Twitter.

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© LUCAS JACKSON/Reuters/Corbis

Twitter will make a big changes to its 140-character service when it introduces an algorithmic timeline as early as next week, according to BuzzFeed.

It's not clear if users will be required to use the new timeline, which will reorder tweets based on what Twitter's algorithm thinks you want to see. Currently, Twitter displays tweet in reverse chronological order.

For power users, if the algorithmic-based timeline is required to be used, it could mean switching services. Many in news, finance, and other industries rely on Twitter for its ability to update current information within seconds. (Update: Twitter confirms real-time won't be killed.)

For the average person, an algorithmic timeline could mean the noise of Twitter is kept out, something Jack Dorsey, CEO of Twitter, has been thinking about deeply.

"We continue to show a questioning of our fundamentals in order to make the product easier and more accessible to more people," Dorsey said in July.

Twitter began experimenting with algorithm-recommended content last year. The "While you were away" feature displays at the top of your timeline and shows a recap of some of the top Tweets you might have missed from accounts you follow.

Twitter doesn't make it easy for new users to get going on the service. If Twitter were to implement the algorithmic-based time, it could cater specific tweets to new users.

Twitter is in desperate need of a turn around, as its stock has been getting hammered, down 22 percent since the beginning of 2016. Four senior executives announced they were leaving the company last week and many financial analysts wonder where Twitter's growth will come from in the future.

Update 2/6/16 5PM EST: Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey confirmed real-time Twitter feeds will stay.

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