Will Dell stuff Ubuntu PCs full of craplets?

Summary:Would you buy an Ubuntu-based Dell PC if it was loaded with craplets?

OK, so Dell is going to ship PCs loaded with Linux. But will they all be bursting at the seams with craplets?

We know that when it comes to the PC, Dell, like most OEMs, fill PCs with all kinds of trial programs and old versions. Dell gets paid for installing them, software companies get exposure for their programs, and the consumer has to spend a lot of time and effort removing them. Everyone's happy (oh wait, no ...). These applications, collectively known as craplets, help to Dell keep the price of a PC down.

[poll id=140]

But will Dell take the same approach with Ubuntu? Will the OS be bloated with junk applications that users will have to wade through and remove, or will Dell finally start shipping PCs with virgin operating systems?

If Dell is looking to ship craplet-infested Ubuntu boxes, what will the software be? If not, how will this affect the price of a new PC?

I for one hope that the Ubuntu-based Dell PCs will be shipped with as clean an operating system as possible. I don't think that the kind of people likely to buy a Dell with Linux installed on it will take kindly to having craplets shoved down their throats. I am worried though at the effect that this will have on the price. Still, it'll be easy to nuke the OS and reinstall.

Thoughts?

Topics: Dell, Hardware, Open Source

About

Adrian Kingsley-Hughes is an internationally published technology author who has devoted over a decade to helping users get the most from technology -- whether that be by learning to program, building a PC from a pile of parts, or helping them get the most from their new MP3 player or digital camera.Adrian has authored/co-authored technic... Full Bio

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