Windows 7: Paint a Lemon and Call it Innovation?

Summary:Windows 7: Paint a Lemon and Call it Innovation?Author: Eric EversonIn the automotive industry junk cars are dubbed lemons; these are the junkers that shady auto dealers repaint and polish just to make the cars more attractive to unsuspecting car buyers.

Windows 7: Paint a Lemon and Call it Innovation? Author: Eric Everson

In the automotive industry junk cars are dubbed lemons; these are the junkers that shady auto dealers repaint and polish just to make the cars more attractive to unsuspecting car buyers. So you’ve got to be asking why is a company like Microsoft (a company historically championed for their innovation) being compared to a shady auto dealer. In a nutshell, as you start to actually listen to the tech savvy experts of the world, you too will also begin to uncover that the new Windows 7 platform is surprisingly like the painted lemon you try to avoid when buying a car.

I have to admit, I really do have high expectations for Microsoft so it just makes me shake my head in disappointment to see yet another rush-job pushed prematurely into the software market. Like so many other software gurus, I have to admit that I too was secretly hanging on to the notion that the release of Windows 7 would right all (or at least most) of the wrongs that Vista introduced. As it seems if you were disappointed with Vista (arguably the worst blunder in Microsoft history) then I’m sure you’ll feel the woes of Windows 7 too.

With my intimate history of marketing innovative technologies, I have to say that tying the Windows brand to what is seemingly another junk version of Vista could be detrimental to Microsoft. Unfortunately, this is exactly what the executive powers at Microsoft have done. To make matters worse as many analysts have already noted, Windows 7 in many cases does not even incorporate the fixes that have been worked into Vista. Can anyone else see the buzzards starting to circle in the sky above?

Like I said, I have high expectations for Microsoft so this whole repackaging Vista as an innovative new “Windows 7” is a real let down. With companies like Google gaining traction hard and fast in the Operating System (OS) sector, I believe it’s time for Microsoft to revisit their roots of innovation. Surely the talent hasn’t all jumped ship, but from the looks of things an infusion of new blood might be exactly what Microsoft needs to regain its innovative capital. As it seems today, the stage of the OS sector is being set for a serious shake up.

It’s hard to say it better than InfoWorld’s Randall Kennedy as he noted, “Bottom line: So far, Windows 7 looks, behaves, and performs almost exactly like Windows Vista. And it breaks all sorts of things that used to work just fine under Vista. In other words, Microsoft's follow-up to its most unpopular OS release since Windows Me threatens to deliver zero measurable performance benefits while introducing new and potentially crippling compatibility issues.” Is Windows 7 just a painted lemon under the cloak of innovation?

Your go-to guy in innovative tech, -Eric E: aka The MobileTech

Good Reading by Randall Kennedy: http://www.pcworld.com/article/153624/under_the_hood_windows_7_is_vistas_twin.html

Eric Everson is a leading mobile technologies researcher and is the founder of MyMobiSafe.com. If you would like to contact Eric Everson for interview or with research related inquiries contact him directly at EricEverson@Hotmail.com.

Topics: Mobility

About

Eric Everson: Founder of MyMobiSafe.com. As a pioneer in mobile security, Eric Everson led MyMobiSafe, LLC from R&D through startup. Today, MyMobiSafe Verified has become the hallmark of quality throughout the app-driven wireless community. Everson is a graduate of the Harvard Business School MIT Program and holds a bachelors degree i... Full Bio

Kick off your day with ZDNet's daily email newsletter. It's the freshest tech news and opinion, served hot. Get it.

Related Stories

The best of ZDNet, delivered

You have been successfully signed up. To sign up for more newsletters or to manage your account, visit the Newsletter Subscription Center.
Subscription failed.