World of Wordcraft: featuring Viacom vs. Google lawyers

OK, let's go to the battlefield and listen in on what Viacom is saying in conjunction with their $1 billion, 160,000-clip, 1.6 billion views, lawsuit against Google and its YouTube site:“YouTube is a significant, for-profit organization that has built a lucrative business out of exploiting the devotion of fans to others’ creative works in order to enrich itself and its corporate parent Google.

OK, let's go to the battlefield and listen in on what Viacom is saying in conjunction with their $1 billion, 160,000-clip, 1.6 billion views, lawsuit against Google and its YouTube site:

“YouTube is a significant, for-profit organization that has built a lucrative business out of exploiting the devotion of fans to others’ creative works in order to enrich itself and its corporate parent Google.  Their business model, which is based on building traffic and selling advertising off of unlicensed content, is clearly illegal and is in obvious conflict with copyright laws.  In fact, YouTube’s strategy has been to avoid taking proactive steps to curtail the infringement on its site, thus generating significant traffic and revenues for itself while shifting the entire burden – and high cost – of monitoring YouTube onto the victims of its infringement.

This behavior stands in stark contrast to the actions of other significant distributors, who have recognized the fair value of entertainment content and have concluded agreements to make content legally available to their customers around the world.

There is no question that YouTube and Google are continuing to take the fruit of our efforts without permission and destroying enormous value in the process.  This is value that rightfully belongs to the writers, directors and talent who create it and companies like Viacom that have invested to make possible this innovation and creativity. 

After a great deal of unproductive negotiation, and remedial efforts by ourselves and other copyright holders, YouTube continues in its unlawful business model.  Therefore, we must turn to the courts to prevent Google and YouTube from continuing to steal value from artists and to obtain compensation for the significant damage they have caused.”

Google, of course, has a response. Search engine land got it via email:

We have not received the lawsuit but are confident that YouTube has respected the legal rights of copyright holders and believe the courts will agree. YouTube is great for users and offers real opportunities to rights holders: the opportunity to interact with users; to promote their content to a young and growing audience; and to tap into the online advertising market. We will certainly not let this suit become a distraction to the continuing growth and strong performance of YouTube and its ability to attract more users, more traffic and build a stronger community.

Translation:

Viacom to Google/YouTube: "you're evil, and are breakin' the law, breakin' the law..."

Google/YouTube to Viacom: "we're smart, we care, and we're nice, too." 

The two sides are not even talking to each other at this point.

They are preening.

Oooh, this is going to be fun to watch and report on. Can't believe I get paid to write about this stuff. 

 

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