Village Roadshow confirms Netflix is coming to Australia

Village Roadshow confirms Netflix is coming to Australia

Summary: As the company takes up the fight to deter online copyright infringement, Village Roadshow co-CEO Graham Burke has confirmed that Netflix is in negotiations to come to Australia in the near future.

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Film production and distribution company Village Roadshow has confirmed that US video-on-demand giant Netflix is in negotiations to access to its content for a local Australian launch.

netflix-hq
(Image: Supplied)

Rumours of a local launch of the streaming company are rife, with speculation about a pending Netflix launch rising every few months only to be told by the company that it has no plans for the Australian market at this stage. The most recent rumour pegged an official launch in Australia for next year.

Netflix has remained relatively quiet on plans for a local launch, and the biggest hurdle the company will need to overcome before arriving in the country is signing local content deals to be able to offer a range of TV shows and films in that country. Each region Netflix operates in tends to have differing content available depending on local content deals.

Speaking to ZDNet, Graham Burke, the co-CEO of Village Roadshow, which produces and distributes films in Australia, said Netflix was on its way.

"[On] Netflix, they're talking to our people about supply of products, so they are opening and coming to Australia," he said.

Burke did not put a timeline on its arrival, and although rival services such as Quickflix, Presto, and Ezyflix have moved in to fill the gap in the market by Netflix's absence, the move into Australia would likely bring an end to one line of argument used by people for online copyright infringement about the lack of the availability of a service like Netflix in Australia.

It comes as the Australian government is considering different proposals to crack down on users sharing copyright-infringing TV shows, films, and music online in Australia, with the Attorney-General's Department and the Communications Department developing a number of policy alternatives including the controversial "graduated response" method for deterring online copyright infringement.

Although Burke couldn't put a figure on how much it was costing his company, he said that copyright infringement was "becoming like a bushfire" in Australia.

"Our numbers are soft, but also just the sheer number of anecdotal reports. It's just massive," he said.

"We make AU$2.6 billion-worth of films in Australia. If the piracy thing is not nailed, it's over mate. O-V-E-R."

One of the most common arguments made for why Australians turn to piracy is the delayed release of TV shows and films. In Australia, internet service provider iiNet pointed out that The Lego Movie, distributed by Village Roadshow, was not released until two months after the US release. Burke said this was a one-off, and attacked iiNet's chief regulatory officer Steve Dalby for making the claim.

"The reason Lego was delayed because it was an Australian film."

"The Lego Movie, with iiNet along with all the lies they tell, and they know they're telling lies, a lot of good decent people out there have a bunch of assumptions they believe to be correct [because of iiNet]. They know that Lego was a rare exception. The reason Lego was delayed because it was an Australian film," he said.

"We made the decision to hold it off a couple of months until the school holiday break so kids could see it in the holidays which is when they want to see it. That was a one off. It's not an example of how films are delayed in Australia."

Burke advocates a policy to be implemented by the government that would see users sent "education" notices that advise them to cease infringing.

"They'd start with a notice to people saying 'are you aware that this is not a victimless crime? Other people will lose their jobs'," he said.

Burke suggested that users' internet download speeds should be slowed down if they're caught infringing multiple times.

"We believe it should lead to slowing down of the speed. That's what ISPs and iiNet, who are the principal screamers, that's what they do on a regular basis," he said.

"They sell you a plan, and if you're exceeding that plan, they slow you down until you pay more money."

"If the piracy thing is not nailed, it's over mate. O-V-E-R."

He said ISPs had an obligation to help deter copyright infringement, and compared it to airports having security to ensure airlines were safe.

"The airport has some responsibility to ensure people are safe, and there's scrutiny of bags to ensure people don't have guns and bombs," he said.

Following the 2012 High Court ruling against Village Roadshow and others that iiNet did not authorise its users' copyright infringement by refusing to pass on notices to its customers, the copyright holders and ISPs ceased roundtable discussions over a voluntary scheme to deter infringers. One of the sticking points, the ISPs said at the time, was the unwillingness for copyright holders to pay the costs for implementing the notice system.

Burke said that the ISPs were just as reluctant to work with the rights holders.

"We went there naive, innocent, and fresh, trying to work out a co-operative thing," he said.

"They were just recalcitrant ... so we just spent two years getting nowhere."

He said copyright owners "will contribute to the cost" of the infringement system, but said done right "the costs are minimal".

Dalby has previously rejected the argument that iiNet profits from customers who infringe on copyright, insisting that the more a customer uses their monthly quota, the more it costs iiNet overall. Burke rejected the claim.

"That's what they say, but have a look at their business model," he said.

"They have large plans because people are paying them what they pay them because they have a smorgasbord of stolen goods they can access. People have taken that plan because they're figuring out how much pirating they're going to do.

"It's a bit like saying why arrest drunks on the road that are killing people because more will come that are drunk"

"iiNet produce nothing in Australia. All they are is an ISP that rents space. That's all. They clip the ticket."

He said the system wouldn't assess the content of what people are downloading, and the proposed website block for sites like The Pirate Bay would only come after copyright owners go to court and get an injunction. He said the argument that such systems haven't worked in other jurisdictions was not a reason to not try it in Australia.

"iiNet say that 'Legislation has not been successful in other jurisdictions so why bother?' It's a bit like saying why arrest drunks on the road that are killing people because more will come that are drunk," he said.

Although the issue of copyright infringement in Australia has been major news since the commencement of the iiNet trial six years ago, Village Roadshow has kept its name out of the headlines, despite being the named party in the iiNet court case. The company has typically been represented by Australian Screen Association, formerly known as the Australian Federation Against Copyright Theft.

Burke said he was speaking out now because he wants to encourage the film industry to thrive in Australia.

"I'm doing this because it will affect the profit of my company [but] that's not my primary motivator. I feel I'm representing all those people who don't and can't speak for themselves," he said.

"The iiNet High Court case cost us millions. We lost it on the basis that the judges actually agreed with us. They said 'we interpret the law, and the law as it stands needs to be re-written'."

ZDNet revealed earlier this year that Village Roadshow had donated close to AU$4 million to both the Labor and Liberal parties since 1998. Burke declined to comment on these donations.

Topics: Piracy, Government, Government AU, Australia

About

Armed with a degree in Computer Science and a Masters in Journalism, Josh keeps a close eye on the telecommunications industry, the National Broadband Network, and all the goings on in government IT.

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Talkback

14 comments
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  • Missed the point of the argument ...

    "Burke did not put a timeline on its arrival, and although rival services such as Quickflix, Presto, and Ezyflix have moved in to fill the gap in the market by Netflix's absence, the move into Australia would likely bring an end to one line of argument used by people for online copyright infringement about the lack of the availability of a service like Netflix in Australia."

    Still need to address the exclusivity laws. If Netflix doesn't have any content to give us because Foxtel has gobbled it all up, the point Burke makes is moot. The service needs to be available, but so does the content.
    colonel.mattyman
  • IF content = wants THEN purchase.subscription

    If all the content is there, the price does not come with an outrageous Australia Tax, I will absolutely subscribe to the service. I DO think it's the answer to Australia's piracy problems.

    I hate Foxtel and it's subscription model and cannot justify the $50-$150 per month to watch 30 channels of crap with ads just to get the 5-10 channels I do want...and I still have to watch them on Foxtel's schedule (unless I buy IQ and spend even more money).

    I think if Netflix is implemented properly here in Australia then I think you'll find piracy WILL be drastically reduced.

    Now, the only problem of course is bandwidth. Oops the Liberals are in and destroying what was going to be the answer for that. So not everyone will be able to stream Netflix properly.

    We're getting there.....very.....slowly.
    Ramrunner-5dd3e
  • The key to Mr Burke's inverted thinking

    Use this sentence as a guide to the mental processes that are being applied to the content owners' arguments.

    "The iiNet High Court case cost us millions. We lost it on the basis that the judges actually agreed with us."

    If you can make sense out of that, every thing else falls into place - including, perhaps, the tortured, convoluted, nonsensical analogies.

    Next we'll hear that black is actually white and that copyright extremists play with a straight bat.

    Oh, wait ...
    Dalbs
  • LOL

    So Village Roadshow wants the law to be written so they can benifit the system?

    ""The iiNet High Court case cost us millions. We lost it on the basis that the judges actually agreed with us. They said 'we interpret the law, and the law as it stands needs to be re-written'.""

    I find that very concerning that lobbyists, at the helm of the liberal party can simply at the wave of their magic wand to get whatever they want.
    DanielZenno
  • Delayed by greed

    As Burke said the Lego Movie was 'delayed because it was an Australian movie' then in the next paragraph said 'decision to hold off a couple of months until the school holiday break'. You cannot have your cake and eat it too! You want to release it late to increase the school holiday crowds then complain that people don't go because they illegally down load it. Village had the movie at cinemas because I went to a 'special' preview at least a month before the Lego Movie was headlined at Village.
    n.lloydshrimpton@...
  • Who pays for Airport security?

    "He said ISPs had an obligation to help deter copyright infringement, and compared it to airports having security to ensure airlines were safe.
    "The airport has some responsibility to ensure people are safe, and there's scrutiny of bags to ensure people don't have guns and bombs," he said."
    Yes but who pays for this. Isn't it the airlines through airport fees?
    If Village Roadshow is the airline and wants airport security, pay for it.
    whoknows-47819
  • Content is King

    The downside of NetFlix coming to Australia is that it is likely that they will NOT have the same content as the US edition of the product, and we will be just as screwed as we are today. When organisation such as Foxtel are able to sign agreements that restrict content release by region, then we will remain the poor cousin with no ability to view what we want to without waiting. Just look at GoT - the latest season is still not available in AppleTV even in the US.

    Also, Burkes arguments are laughable. He claims the ISP's were recalcitrant and the media industry went in naively? maybe they were naive enough to believe that the ISP's would bend to their demands, but the whole image of the ISP's being the bad guy in the room when they are sitting around the table with the likes of the AFACT is just laughable.
    gr1f
  • Roadshow are thieves

    "The reason Lego was delayed [launching in Australia] because it was an Australian film"
    That doesn't make any sense whatsoever.
    blu6
    • Mr Burke

      Is using the Chewbacca defence. It isn't supposed to make sense.
      meski.oz@...
  • The 'you make me do it' defence seems to be popular on both sides

    "We made the decision to hold it off a couple of months until the school holiday break so kids could see it in the holidays which is when they want to see it. That was a one off. It's not an example of how films are delayed in Australia"

    Did I miss the announcement that films can only be shown in Australian cinemas for two weeks? If piracy is because of delayed releases, then how can you then claim that you delayed the release because of public demand?

    And if Netflix without the right content fails to be the magic cure, will they then admit that content is more important than the brand? Customers paid for GoT on iTunes and then Foxtel took that away. Do think having the same content unavailable on yet another platform will help their position?
    noonereallycares
  • Your still getting it wrong.

    "We made the decision to hold it off a couple of months until the school holiday break so kids could see it in the holidays which is when they want to see it."

    Mr Burke - You held it off until the school holidays because that is when YOU wanted us to see it. Please don't tell me when I want to see a movie. I can decide that for myself.
    Fruit salad
  • Dear Mr Burke...

    It's not difficult to connect to Netflix USA right now, why should we wait for the crippled and overpriced version you'll eventually offer us? Surely you don't think I'm a pirate because I pay for Netflix USA?
    meski.oz@...
  • what inflammtory rubbish

    Firstly the claim iiNet contributes nothing to the economy in terms of job. Having worked for ISP this I find laughable. Information Technology & Telecommunications sectors in Australia account for 2.72 % of employment (2011), and very large percent of that relates to very high income positions far above the national average.

    Having been in Australian films and had many family and friends work in, on and create them I can say that Village has done very little for our economy. The vast majority of films in Australia have been produced with by Film Australia. Why Village is isn't in an uproad about Screen Australia losing $25m in funding says how much they care about the Australian film and television sector. Reckon Village is going pony that up in local productions...

    nah lets make a yankee film that pulls em by the billions. Screw the local culture. Sydney...nah that's just a place on a matrix film. Nothin interesting happens there.

    See the real motivation to attack iiNet comes from the fact that Villages biggest customer, FoxTel, part own, ironically by a dreaded Telco (Telstra) is deeply threatened by iiNet and with Village a welcome attack dog its little surprise Telstra remain quiet during the court case.

    Hell there even investing in various businesses together. Village and Telstra are definitely more then just friends.

    So when you see a rabid dog like Burke get up and try to hose iiNet down with insane, outrageous and utterly vexatious remarks like those sprayed in this article you can guarantee such a small mind is being worked by bigger ones else where.
    chugs@...
  • Think your article is wrong now...

    AFR states that Netflix has delayed coming to Australia, but heading for Europe.

    http://www.afr.com/p/business/marketing_media/netflix_moves_focus_to_europe_delays_OnJmtH4zgIomUgq0405fBP
    DanielZenno