AusCERT ditches annual e-crimes survey

AusCERT ditches annual e-crimes survey

Summary: The Australian Computer Emergency Response Team (AusCERT) will not be publishing its annual e-crimes survey this year because the federal government has given funding to the Australian Institute of Criminology (AIC) instead.In a statement sent to ZDNet Australia today, an AusCERT spokesperson said the survey had been scrapped because funding from the Attorney General's office had been given to the AIC.

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The Australian Computer Emergency Response Team (AusCERT) will not be publishing its annual e-crimes survey this year because the federal government has given funding to the Australian Institute of Criminology (AIC) instead.

In a statement sent to ZDNet Australia today, an AusCERT spokesperson said the survey had been scrapped because funding from the Attorney General's office had been given to the AIC.

"It was decided that there was little benefit to be gained in producing two computer crime surveys in any one calendar year which focused on similar issues and sample populations.

"Therefore, for 2007, AusCERT has decided to devote its efforts elsewhere," the statement said.

The statement also confirmed that the government had chosen to fund the AIC survey.

"Previously, the Attorney-General's Department had been a regular previous sponsor of the survey. The Australian Institute of Criminology applied and was successful in receiving Australian government funding to conduct a survey," the statement said.

Last year, the AusCERT survey was paid for by the Attorney General's department. It included a four-fold increase in respondents and was conducted by market research firm ACNielsen.

Graham Ingram, general manager of AusCERT, in a phone interview with ZDNet Australia admitted that the survey would be missed but he denied that it was dead and buried.

"A lot of people wanted to see the survey continue but the same survey every year is not helpful. The survey had to change and we were thinking about how to make that change. [AIC] have a different focus and some new ideas.

"I am not saying that AusCERT will not do a future survey," Ingram said.

The news came just days after the budget, when the Attorney General allocated AU$12 million to GovCERT over the next four years.

Topics: Government, Government AU, AUSCERT

Munir Kotadia

About Munir Kotadia

Munir first became involved with online publishing in 1998 when he joined ZDNet UK and later moved into print publishing as Chief Reporter for IT Week, part of ZDNet UK, a weekly trade newspaper targeted at Enterprise IT managers. He later moved back into online publishing as Senior News Reporter for ZDNet UK.

Munir was recognised as Australia's Best Technology Columnist at the 5th Annual Sun Microsystems IT Journalism Awards 2007. In the previous year he was named Best News Journalist at the Consensus IT Writers Awards.

He no longer uses his Commodore 64.

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  • AusCERT ditches annual e-crimes survey

    Like any survey the true value is in what the market will pay for the research. If the crime survey is of any value, then Auscert should continue its publication. I am sure the funds made from the conference could contribute to next year's survey and any fees they got from it's sale would be a bonus.
    anonymous