Apple levels the playing field on the App Store

Apple levels the playing field on the App Store

Summary: Apple made moves over the weekend to close a couple of loopholes in their wildly successful App Store and to level the playing field for developers. Two big changes were rolled out this morning.

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TOPICS: Apple
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Apple levels the playing field on the App StoreApple made moves over the weekend to close a couple of loopholes in their wildly successful App Store and to level the playing field for developers. Two big changes were rolled out this morning.

Apple now only allows customers that have downloaded/purchased an app to review it. Previously, this loophole was easily exploited by developers with an agenda who could submit positive reviews of their own apps and negative reviews of competing apps. No word on whether Apple plans to remove or reset all the current ratings, but I doubt it.

The second major change to the App Store this morning is that Apple no longer moves updated applications to the first page of their respective category page. Apple still lists applications by their "release date" but no longer considers incremental updates as a new release. The previous system resulted in a large bump in sales every time an application got updated because of its higher visibility on its category page.

Now Apple needs to allow customers to download trial/demo versions of all paid applications.

(Tip: AppleInsider)

Topic: Apple

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5 comments
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  • Holy crap what a non event

    There is ABSOLUTELY NO leveling here. The store is still disgustingly tipped to Apple's benefit. Wake me when they stop stealing 30% off the top and denying apps that they think are such a good idea that they want to copy them and only allow their own.
    Johnny Vegas
    • That is an interesting point

      [i]denying apps that they think are such a good idea that they want to copy them and only allow their own[/i]

      How could you prove otherwise? Apple could do just that with the explanation that they "allready had that in the works", there is no way you could prove Apple actually did not.
      GuidingLight
    • The 30% is pretty standard

      I don't deny them their cut, though I may think it's high, it's pretty standard for distribution costs. We'll see how it affects developers moving to more open stores like Android.

      Agreed on the 'competing' products piece - where's the motivation for long development of truly great apps when you know Apple may deny them?
      coffeeshark
  • MS does something very similar

    They create their own version of many of their
    developers products. Before there was MS Office there
    were many word processors and spreadsheet
    applications; WordPerfect, QuatroPro, Lotus123, to
    name a few. When was the last time you used any of
    them? They've done it with the brower, remote
    desktop, media player, active directory, exchange,
    outlook.
    They constantly marginalize their
    developer/competitors products by rolling similar
    functions into the OS or simply copying their
    competitors products.
    When you monopolize the OS you have a great advantage.
    GoPower
  • RE: Apple levels the playing field on the App Store

    > Apple no longer moves updated applications to the first
    page of their respective category page.

    THETA Poker 1.0.0, the strongest, easiest-to-use Texas
    Hold 'Em game for the iPhone, became available in the App
    Store just yesterday, and it barely made the first page of
    the New section under Games/Casino. In the number one
    slot: Adrenaline Poker 1.4, which has been out for quite a
    while. Maybe Apple doesn't move you up on 1.4.1 and so
    forth, but it's definitely not looking at the original release
    date.
    rjen