Apple releases Intel-based iBook successor (Update2)

Apple releases Intel-based iBook successor (Update2)

Summary: As expected, Apple this morning announced the high anticipated successor to the iBook notebook computer. The new MacBook (no "Pro") is available for ordering today from the Apple online store and it comes in polycarbonate black or white, just like the iPod.

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TOPICS: Hardware
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MacBook: Click to enlarge

As expected, Apple this morning announced the high anticipated successor to the iBook notebook computer. The new MacBook (no "Pro") is available for ordering today from the Apple online store and it comes in polycarbonate black or white, just like the iPod.

Three configurations are available:

13-inch: White
- 1.83GHz Intel Core Duo
- 13.3-inch widescreen display
- 1280 x 800 resolution
- 512MB memory (2x256MB SODIMMs)
- 60GB 5400-rpm Serial ATA hard drive
- Combo drive (DVD-ROM, CD-RW)
- US$1,099
- Ships: 1-5 Business Days

13-inch: White
- 2.0GHz Intel Core Duo
- 13.3-inch widescreen display
- 1280 x 800 resolution
- 512MB memory (2x256MB SODIMMs)
- 60GB 5400-rpm Serial ATA hard drive
- SuperDrive (DVD±RW, CD-RW)
- US$1,299
- Ships: 1-5 Business Days

13-inch: Black
- 2.0GHz Intel Core Duo
- 13.3-inch widescreen display
- 1280 x 800 resolution
- 512MB memory (2x256MB SODIMMs)
- 80GB 5400-rpm Serial ATA hard drive
- SuperDrive (DVD±RW, CD-RW)
- US$1,499
- Ships: 1-5 Business Days

Some notes:

- Intel Core Duo processors across the board, no Core Solos.

- The black/white color choice is not a Configure-To-Order (CTO) option, the black case is only available in the high-end 2.0GHz/SuperDrive configuration.

- No dual-layer DVD burning, although it can read dual-layer DVDs.

- Intel GMA 950 graphics processor with 64MB of DDR2 SDRAM shared with main memory.

- The black case costs US$150 extra when you consider that upgrading the 60GB drive to the 80GB drive only costs US$50 as a CTO option. 

- The MacBook marks Apple's return to the black notebook computer in over six years. The "BlackBook" is the first black colored Apple notebook since the PowerBook G3 (Pismo) was announced on 16 February 2000.

- BlackBook and WhiteBook weigh in at 5.2 pounds, a full pound heavier than the 12-inch PowerBook G4 (4.2 pounds).

Shipping is listed as 1-5 days, but you can expect that date to creep further out as orders begin to queue throughout the day.

Topic: Hardware

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14 comments
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  • Apple gets smart!

    Finally Apple hears the critics! It is good to see that the wait of an extra week for announcement -rumored to be last Tuesday-means that there is stock to fill MacBook orders immediately (plus shipping). More satisfied customers instead of the usual grumbles.
    lizinny
  • Is weight an issue?

    People may be interested that the new MB weighs in at 5.2 lbs which is about a pound [b]heavier[/b] than the 12-inch PBG4. Is this a problem for anyone?

    -Jason
    Jason D. O'Grady
    • Weight is an issue

      I carry my 12" PowerBook with me in my purse equivalent. The two
      make or break issues for me are weight and ability to connect to
      projectors for talks (with sufficient video RAM for eye catching
      special effects). I want a 10" MacBook Pro To Go!
      zdjtd
  • Weak memory configuration

    Seems like 1GB is or should be the minimum memory configuration. It seems to me that is a big miss - especially when the graphics is shared.

    Aside from that, I am sure this is a great laptop to consider.
    Prognosticator
  • The end of PowerPC based Apples?

    Does this mean Apple will no longer sell PC's with PowerPC processors? If it does, this is the end of Apple Computer. These Intel-based machines are disasters waiting to happen. They run too hot, are susceptible to viruses, only run "some" applications faster, ... The list goes on and on.
    metilley@...
    • Yes, indeed, it does.

      'metilley' -- relax. These are early days, so the issues you mention
      should be worked out in a revision or two. For the record, I am very
      happy with my PPC PowerBooks and iBook and will NOT be running
      out to re-buy anything for a number of years.
      999ad@...
    • Not true

      With all due respect, metilley, you don't really know what you're talking about. Your response is apparently based on a combination of old data and myths about Intel processors.

      1. Yes, some Pentium 4 processors ran hot. But these are not Pentium 4's, these are the new breed: Intel Core Duo processors. They work on the exact opposite philosophy -- they are engineered to run at lower clock speeds. As a result, they run much, much cooler than Pentium 4's. You want to talk about a hot processor? Try the PowerPC G5. Now, THAT was a hot processor. Too hot for notebooks.

      2. CPUs are not susceptible to viruses. Whether a machine is based on an IBM processor or an Intel processor makes not one iota of difference as far as getting infected with a virus. You are most likely associating "Intel" with "Windows." And yes, Windows gets more viruses than OSX, mostly because no one bothers to write viruses for OSX, prefering instead to hit the OS with the most widespread exposure. But if you have an Intel Mac running OSX, it is not inherently more susceptible to viruses than a PowerPC Mac running OSX.

      3. The reason that Intel Macs only run "some" apps faster is because those old PowerPC apps have not been optimized for Intel Core Duo processors. Sort of akin to stuff having to be either "carbonized" or rewritten for the transition from OS9 to OSX. No big deal. You'll see an increasingly long list of apps that run faster.

      4. "The list goes on and on"? What else is a problem?

      I think you'll be very happy switching from a PowerPC Mac to a Core Duo Mac.
      GuillermoR
      • Haha thanks for your post

        It saved me a good five minutes!

        Knowledge is power ;-)
        anythingbutmine0
    • The end of PowerPC based Apples?

      Death knell #50 or #51, I think!

      Metilley, you need to get out a bit more. Apple has been selling
      computers with the Intel Duo processors since January. With
      great success, I might add. The introduction of the 'consumer'
      MacBook completes Apple's laptop transition from the
      antiquated PPC G4 chip to a modern Intel chip.

      Viruses?!? Surely you jest. Repeat after me, 'There are NO
      virsuses for Mac OS X.' None. Nada. Zip. After 6 years in service
      OS X remains virus-free (regardless of the chip running the
      Mac).

      True 'some' applications run faster. The 1000s that have been
      recompiled to take advantage of the Core Duo chip. (See here
      http://guide.apple.com/universal/). And more are being
      updated daily.
      machelpdesk
    • Re: The end of PowerPC based Apples? YES!

      I think your comments were a bit off the cuff as the Intel chips will
      usher in a new era for Apple and it's machines. I, for one, am very
      happy with my Macbook Pro 2.0 ghz. Just like the switch from OS 9
      to OSX, things will be S L O W, but the developers will quickly catch
      up.
      tatdude_keytee
    • Definitly not

      Okay, apart from the myths discussed in previous responses, you did forget one big PowerPC computer:

      The POWERMAC

      With the quad core 2,5 GHz powerPC (2xdual), it outruns almost every other computer on the market, and it can be upgraded to 16 GB of RAM and a NVIDIA QUADRO FX 4500 512 SDRAM, to support two 30-inch screens.

      Plus, there are also the Xserve server systems, which have PowerPC chips.
      Numendil
  • Monitor mirroring vs spanning?

    Tracking down the differences between the MacBook and the Pro, seems like a big chunk of them are graphics-related: screen res, graphics card, and ?monitor spanning.

    My quick scan of the specs suggests the new MacBooks can _mirror_ but not _span_. I'd be really interested to know if this can be got round (as with the old iBooks) - 'cos in other ways the new 'books look like a deal.
    wycombiensian
    • Don't think so

      It's highly unlikely that there will be any way to configure them to span if they are only programmed for mirroring. I was unaware that there was a way around this on the old iBooks, but if there was, that was a software issue. I am relatively certain that the reason there is no spanning supported on the new MacBooks is because the hardware simply doesn't support it, which can't be fixed with a software/driver tweak.
      anythingbutmine0
  • I really want to buy a new MacBook

    but this is just too heavy. It is double the weight of a Sony Vaio TX series which has pretty much the same capability, but is stuck with Windows. Ok, it has an older, slower Intel chip, but it is fast enough on a power-to-weight basis. Another thing. Why can't Apple put in a two button trackpad?
    georgep_z