iTunes 6 cracked

iTunes 6 cracked

Summary: Remember the Hymn Project and how it cracked the DRM on iTunes-purchased music? Well it stopped working as of iTunes 5.0.1. The project Web site is reporting that a new tool called QTFairUse is available that removes the DRM from iTunes 6-purchased music as well.

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TOPICS: Legal
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Remember the Hymn Project and how it cracked the DRM on iTunes-purchased music? Well it stopped working as of iTunes 5.0.1. The project Web site is reporting that a new tool called QTFairUse is available that removes the DRM from iTunes 6-purchased music as well. According to one of the posters:

It works in the same way as the original QTFairUse - intercepts AAC frames after they're decrypted but before they're decoded. And you can compare the file sizes - dumped streams are a few hundred K less than the encrypted m4ps, since the latter include artwork and other metadata.

The problems with using QTFairUse are:

  1. It's illegal
  2. It's Windows only
  3. It uses a real time stream-ripping approach, which is slow
  4. It strips all the ID3 tags in the process 

 What's the over/under on when Apple releases (and requires) iTunes 6.0.6 for music purchases?

Topic: Legal

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6 comments
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  • Windows only? Dammit!

    If this were available for the Mac, I'd be a customer at the iTunes store. Sadly, I'll have to obtain my music by other means.
    tic swayback
    • Burning...

      You do know you can burn the tracks to cds, and then rip it, right?

      I'm not that fond of the iTunes store, but for other reasons. I've only bought 1 album that way.

      It cost $9.99, and the advantage was that I got it right away, which was important at the time. But I didn't get hardcopies of artwork, lyrics, facts about the band, and I had to burn my own CD and supply my own jewel case, and the CD I created had no track names listed on it, nor did the jewel case. I *could* have done all that, but didn't have time, and the end result would not have been that great (i.e. professional) anyway.

      All in all, I felt it to be more like a $4-$5 value, not $10.

      -Dan
      Dan__
      • CD is not the issue for me

        I listen to music in my house through several Squeezeboxes, which stream music wirelessly at a fairly high quality of sound. These can't play any ripped song that contains DRM, so no purchased downloads will work.

        Sure, I could buy the song, burn it to a cd, then re-rip it, but downloaded songs are of low enough quality to start with, and I don't want to pay 99 cents for it and end up with something even lower quality than what I started with. It's easier just to wait and buy a used cd.
        tic swayback
        • Yes, quality is the other issue

          I've always thought that mp3 at healthy compressions, (i.e. bit rates less then 190K or so) and standard AAC (which has never been revered by audiophiles) were suitable for in-car audio and casual listening environments, but not for in-home high fidelity experiences.

          If you have a hi-fi setup for your digital music, I certainly agree that you get an inferior product with downloads.

          Just another reason why the prices are still too high.
          Dan__
  • ZDNet Sucks

    Actually, the title of this article is flat out wrong. The encryption has not been cracked, rather audio frames are being intercepted as iTunes decrypts them. This means that you have to listen to the songs in iTunes to have the encryption removed, and then you get to retag all of your songs.

    Not a great deal, but it's the only one we'll be getting for now...use it before iTunes changes the way it handles decryption in memory.
    ummmmhello
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