Mac OS X Lion Preview: New features, orphans first-gen Intel machines

Mac OS X Lion Preview: New features, orphans first-gen Intel machines

Summary: On its developer page, Apple highlights a few new features in Mac OS X 10.7, aka Lion. However, in the release notes, a few more details of interest emerge, including a Recovery HD option, which will replace the Installation DVD, and the orphaning of the first generation of Intel machines.

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On its developer page, Apple highlights a few new features in Mac OS X 10.7, aka Lion. However, in the release notes, a few more details of interest emerge, including Lion Server; a Recovery HD option, which will replace the Installation DVD; and the orphaning of the first generation of Intel machines.

On Apple's Lion page, the company said Lion server will be offered to all users.

Lion Server delivers wireless file sharing for iPad. Enabling WebDAV in Lion Server gives iPad users the ability to access, copy, and share documents on the server from applications such as Keynote, Numbers, and Pages.

On the Apple's developer site, the company points to future features such as Full Screen Apps, a way that developers can present their apps like an iPad.

Provide an immersive, focused user experience with a full screen app. NSApplication, NSWindow, and the NSWindowDelegate Protocol in Mac OS X Lion make it easy for you to create and manage full-screen user interfaces while providing you the power to design rich user interactions

There will be new capabilities in the Aqua interface, including popovers, overlay scrollbars, and "powerful Multi-Touch gestures and animations."

Popovers AppKit framework now includes popovers, a new unit of content that can be positioned relative to other content on the screen. Popovers automatically move whenever the positioning view moves. You can also design popovers that can be detached, allowing them to become a separate window.

Overlay Scrollbars Mac OS X Lion introduces overlay scrollbars similar to those in iOS. These scrollbars appear as an overlay on top of the window's content while the user is scrolling and remain visible briefly to allow scrollbar dragging.

Multi-Touch Gestures and Animations The fluid, responsive animations that create the magical user experience on iPad and iPhone are available in Mac OS X Lion. Design your apps to use Multi-Touch gestures and animations and redefine the interaction users have with your apps.

In addition, Lion will offer a built-in auto-save feature for applications,  which will store changes rather than simply making copies of the whole document. It will provide users with a Time Machine-like interface to track the changes.

And then there's Resume, which is another iOS "innovation." Users can return to an application in the state they where when the app was last running. This would happen even after users log out or restart.

Lion will improve security via Sandboxing and Privilege Separation.

Create apps that are more secure with app sandboxing and privilege separation. Sandboxing protects the system by limiting the kinds of things an application can do, such as accessing files on disk or resources over the network. Limiting the capabilities of an app to just those operations that it needs to perform helps keep the rest of the system more secure in the event that an app is compromised. Privilege separation is another common technique for improving security where an app is factored into smaller pieces, each with their own distinct roles and privileges.

Meanwhile, the Preview notes show that Lion will require a Mac with an Intel Core 2 Duo processor or better. This orphans the first release of Macs with Intel chips during the first half of 2006, although customers may have purchased these machines throughout the rest of the year.

Here's the list of the orphaned models at EveryMac.com.

Topics: Software, Apple, Hardware, Intel, Operating Systems

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  • RE: Mac OS X Lion Preview: New features, orphans first-gen Intel machines

    I already experienced this hurdle once when my G3 iBook couldn't be updated past 10.3 (Panther).<br><br>Windows 7 is more forgiving as far as backward compatibility is concerned; it has no problems with my semi-retired PC with its old Pentium 4 CPU. That machine's counterpart amongst the older Intel Macs will not be able to run Lion.<br><br>"As noted, this certainly isn't a problem for those who bought their Macs within the past 4-5 years, and that is already a good half-life for any workstation." [Editing my own post here, I'm not sure this is a valid statement I made. I leave that in quotes for those who already read it, and are ready to refute it.] <br><br>It does make me wonder, though: if the Core2Duo is the baseline for processors that can run Lion, why was this CPU chosen for the Macbook Air update last year?
    Tech watcher
    • RE: Mac OS X Lion Preview: New features, orphans first-gen Intel machines

      @Tech watcher

      Because apple got a great deal on the processors.

      and how many people who bought Airs realized that there was an SSD surprise waiting for them under the hood. Two people could go into the store at the same time and buy the same model and spec of Air, but each one would get an SSD from a different manufacturer, one of which reads/writes significantly faster than the other. You can't even tell from the box serial numbers which is which ( although I can look at the box that a $50.00 Chinese made BD player is in and tell whether or not it has the new mainboard ). Its like Apple was just running around getting SSDs from wherever to stuff into the Airs.
      Goldie07
      • RE: Mac OS X Lion Preview: New features, orphans first-gen Intel machines

        @Goldie07... <i>"but each one would get an SSD from a different manufacturer"</i>

        Happens all the time with all PC OEM's. Our college orders about a hundred laptops per school year for our student lease program for departments that require laptops, like CST, and the hard disk components inside vary. I have seen HDD's from every major HDD supplier in the same model laptop within the same serial # series, and in fact we had a history of models with the Seagate drive failing, or needing firmware updates.
        Snooki_smoosh_smoosh
      • Can you provide a link

        @Goldie07
        Can you provide a link to any credible information source regarding your SSD claims? It's not that I doubt you, or that I believe you, it's that I'm not familiar with the issue and would like to learn more about it.
        Thanks.
        use_what_works_4_U
      • Apple no different then any other

        @Goldie07
        Apple is no different then any other. They buy in volume and they buy what they can from one manufacture and substitute when they have too.
        jscott418-22447200638980614791982928182376
      • RE: Mac OS X Lion Preview: New features, orphans first-gen Intel machines

        @Goldie07

        The thing your missing is Apple has a history of overdeliverying in such situations. There are dozens of examples where the current specs called for a slower processor and people buying right before refresh were surprised with a faster one. Not saying that is the rule, but it happened to me with the mini Mac about five or six years back.
        tomam
    • RE: Mac OS X Lion Preview: New features, orphans first-gen Intel machines

      @Tech watcher - Yeah, but you need to remember Apple has the burden of pushing computing & society forward, so retaining old hardware to run the latest OS would put everyone back in the dark ages like Windows has remained.

      Snow Leopard will run fine for 10 more years on the Core Duo's so it's not anything to be concerned about.
      Pederson
    • RE: Mac OS X Lion Preview: New features, orphans first-gen Intel machines

      The minimum requirement is that they need to be 64-bit architectures. The 1st Gen MacBook Pros run on 32-bit CPUs, altough the outgoing PowerPC G5 is 64-bit. Those machines were also rushed to market by not including Firewire; which was later re-introduced.
      At some point, universal binaries could be built to 32-bit and 64-bit PowerPC along with 32-bit and 64-bit Intel binaries.
      By making 64-bit CPUs 'baseline'; it allows it to shed much of the fat on the (fat ;) binaries.
      Windows 7 takes a different approach by distributing multiple versions of the OS, both in 32-bit and 64-bit flavors; which is not conductive to high-end environments.
      emiliosic
      • Er.. G5...?

        @emiliosic
        Last I heard, Snow Leopard removed ALL support for PowerPC chips entirely. Doesn't matter if it's 32 bit, 64 bit or 128 bit. It ain't supported.
        Wolfie2K3
    • RE: Mac OS X Lion Preview: New features, orphans first-gen Intel machines

      @Tech watcher
      All iBooks g3 can run 10.4 tiger, at most u need to upgrade your RAM to 256MB. Check here http://support.apple.com/kb/SP111 more than 5 years after their release. I doubt you get full windows 7 features with your pentium4. As for intel core2 duo they are still very efficient CPU and u have to take in consideration the ram speed, the l3 cache, the front bus speed which make the computer performance
      ∞Dilemma
      • RE: Mac OS X Lion Preview: New features, orphans first-gen Intel machines

        @???Dilemma - Before Leopard and without hacking, the version of OS X supported by a G3 Mac was determined by what built-in ports a machine had, with one exception. No USB or Firewire meant you were limited to 10.2; USB only is 10.3; and USB+Firewire was 10.4. The exception was the original PowerBook G3, also known as the PowerBook 3500 or codename Kanga - while it can be hacked to run OS X, it doesn't run any version very well. Many of these machines were 3 or 4 years old when considered outdated enough not to run the newest version of OS X.

        Going a little further on this subject, you should also note that pre-G3 models going on 4 years old at the time were limited to OS 9.1 and couldn't be upgraded to OS 9.2x, again without a hack. These also weren't inexpensive machines - 8500 and 8600 models were typically $2500 or more, and the 9500 and 9600 models started in the $4000 range. It's not out of the question for Apple to cut off 3 and 4 year old machines from the software upgrade path.
        nix_hed
    • RE: Mac OS X Lion Preview: New features, orphans first-gen Intel machines

      @Tech watcher The industry expectation for a desktop PC is between 3 and 5 years. The cheaper the model the less time it has. GreenPeace found that most PCs last about two years. Even considering the average Mac is on the high end of that range Apple cutting off a five year old system from upgrading to an OS that is designed to work effectively on up to date hardware isn't out of line by any means.
      Consider also that not being able to upgrade to Lion doesn't mean your five year old box suddenly ceases to work. As for any software you're running it will take a couple more cycles around old Sol before developers take full advantage of the new Lion/hardware system to the point that, say, the latest version of Photoshop won't run on your, by then, seven or eight year old system.
      dheady@...
    • RE: Mac OS X Lion Preview: New features, orphans first-gen Intel machines

      @nix_hed
      You are right. Tech Watcher is talking about the one iBook (not macs in general or powerbooks G3) (clamshell) that did not have a firewire port and could not have tiger installed without pulling the HD on another machine. Otherwise, it runs fine on it, check here http://discussions.apple.com/thread.jspa?threadID=1328134 though Tiger came a full 6 years after this iBook?s release (1999-2005).The important thing IMHO is that even when Tiger was released, for a couple of years, they could still run a system 10.3 which was still relevant. This means 8 years after their release or more depending on how demanding they are The core duos which were replaced by late 2006 will still run 10.6, the real question is how long 10.6 will be supported and improved by Apple. If you consider the fact that many people still use Tiger, my guess is that it will be the same, at least 7 years from the HW release at least. Remember Core2 Duos were also disadvantaged by their lack of Wifi N support. This happened just a year after their release and nobody can blame Apple for that!
      ∞Dilemma
  • What?

    I can see why they orphaned the G3 and G4 because of the different processor architecture but why not support the older Intel processors? Another ploy from Apple to force people to replace their hardware?

    Could you imagine is Microsoft did this and said that your machine is 5 years old so we are not going support it all and make it so the operating system or software will not even install. OMG the outlash from the trolls on how Microsoft sucks. Yet somehow they will come here and say that this is a good thing that Apple did this. Now I am going to sound like NonZealot by saying Double Standards.
    bobiroc
    • RE: Mac OS X Lion Preview: New features, orphans first-gen Intel machines

      @bobiroc

      Vista.
      alsobannedfromzdnet
      • The funny thing is

        Everyone hates Vista because of this, but this OS will likely be given a pass.
        Michael Alan Goff
      • RE: Mac OS X Lion Preview: New features, orphans first-gen Intel machines

        @alsobannedfromzdnet

        I found a lot of those machines that didn't run Vista so well improved with a bit of a Ram upgrade and the OEM ones that performed poorly had a lot to do with the crAPPLICATIONS that OEMS installed. However the fact remains that Vista was NOT purposely blocked from being installed. While it was a poor performer initially on lower end hardware (spec wise) updates and service packs helped that dramatically.
        bobiroc
      • Vista runs on a Pentium

        @alsobannedfromzdnet
        but you knew that already.
        John Zern
      • @ye

        So, if an ABMer would jump all over Microsoft, rightly or wrongly, you are justified in jumping all over Apple, rightly or wrongly? Is that actually the logical position you want to take? Because it's called a Tu Quoque.

        FYI, I've been on record as stating that MS should have completely scrapped NT with Vista and started from scratch with a ground-up with a modern OS that would take full advantage of modern hardware, and provided backward support through a mechanism similar to how Apple did it with OS 9.
        fr_gough
      • I said no such thing.

        @frgough: [i]So, if an ABMer would jump all over Microsoft, rightly or wrongly, you are justified in jumping all over Apple, rightly or wrongly.[/i]

        But I've not come to expect anything better from you Mr. Strawman.

        [i]FYI, I've been on record as stating that MS should have completely scrapped NT with Vista and started from scratch with a ground-up with a modern OS that would take full advantage of modern hardware, and provided backward support through a mechanism similar to how Apple did it with OS 9. [/i]

        Windows is a modern OS. Repeatedly stating and implying it's not won't change that fact.
        ye