Interop '07: NetGear shows 3 terabyte hardware RAID-based NAS (it's a Web server too)

Interop '07: NetGear shows 3 terabyte hardware RAID-based NAS (it's a Web server too)

Summary: Here in Las Vegas at Interop 2007 while roaming the show floor prior to the start of the event, I bumped into the folks at the NetGear booth who were preparing to announce several products at the show. But the one the grabbed my attention was the latest ReadyNAS network attached storage device.

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Here in Las Vegas at Interop 2007 while roaming the show floor prior to the start of the event, I bumped into the folks at the NetGear booth who were preparing to announce several products at the show. But the one the grabbed my attention was the latest ReadyNAS network attached storage device. The ReadyNAS brand came to NetGear by way of its acquisition of Infrant earlier this month. Infrant clearly had some new updates to existing line up in mind (mostly in the area of increased capacity) and here at Interop, NetGear was showing off a version of the ReadyNAS that goes up to 3 terabytes.

ReadyNAS is cool for a couple of reasons. First, it runs on hardware-based RAID. Second, it natively supports the network filesystem protocols for Windows, Mac, and Linux which means that unlike other NAS' that often dumb themselves down to SMB or CIFS as the filesystem lingua franco that Mac and Linux users must force themselves to talk to (sacrificing certain functionality along the way).

A third interesting feature of the ReadyNAS is its USB port which can be used to turn it into a wireless NAS. You just need to connect a USB WiFi adapter to it. That obviously means it must have built-in driver support and according to company officials, ReadyNAS supports more than just NetGear's USB WiFi adapters. It supports adapter from other popular manufacturers as well. ReadyNAS is also a Web server (if you need one of those). The box is small and tight (easily fits on any desk) but if you want a rack mounted version of ReadyNAS, NetGear has that too. I show both in the video above. Overall, if there's one product I've spied at the Interop that I wouldn't mind having, even at home (to centrally store all the family photos and videos), this would be the one (so far, I'm still looking).

Topics: Hardware, Networking, Servers

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3 comments
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  • Netgear and Patrick Lo's Team have done it again...

    Patrick and the team have done it again, and as you might guess, I think NetGear's products are pretty good. I also like their professionalism and social responsibility, something that Netgear's competitors seem to have missed.

    TSG/
    TSGlassey
    • I don't know Patrick and the team but...

      ... the ReadyNAS line is acquired technology (Infrant Technologies) and not something developed at NetGear. I do agree that it is great technology! I have one (before acquisition) that has 1.2 TB of disk (minus RAID overhead) and I love it.

      The built-in media serving capability is awesome. You can even get a TwonkyVision Media Server plug-in for it. Now if NetGear will get some resources together and make a publicly available framework/SDK to allow anyone to build custom plug-ins, I'd like to add a few services myself, like SubVersion source control server and why not a fully functional personal web server or a VoIP server or ... !?

      Then I'll need a new unit with a faster CPU and a memory upgrade...it never ends! :-)

      I would like to see them build a faster box with a faster CPU sometime soon, but it does well in my opinion for the price point and feature set. I like the concept of a network server "appliance" like this unit effectively is. I'd rather not have a large, power hungry dedicated server if something small like the ReadyNAS will fit in a closet or in a storage room and not be noticed if at all possible and provide RAID to boot!
      PredatorVI
  • What is the performance throughput?

    I found out the hard way that even though it's SATA drives in the box and gigabit on the ethernet, it's the CPU that ultimately determines the throughput when ultimately it's a headless linux based server with raid. I have a Buffalo Terrastation 1 terrabyte that I had to copy files to for a restore proces and because it could only write 35gigs per hour it took us a week to copy the data off. These things should be sold according to their file read and write speeds.
    stealthram