Adobe launches Flash Player 11 over concerns about its future

Adobe launches Flash Player 11 over concerns about its future

Summary: Adobe's point is that Flash and HTML 5 will run side by side for years to come.

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Adobe on Wednesday will launch its Flash Player 11 for general consumption as it works to bolster adoption even as key partners move toward HTML 5 and browser technologies that don't require plug-ins.

The company considers Flash Player 11 and its Adobe AIR 3 to be milestone releases that will enable 3D games, enhance the user experience and improve video delivery. Adobe aims to have 1 billion devices support AIR by the end of 2015.

In an interview, Anup Murarka, director of product marketing for Adobe Flash, had two missions. First, he had to counter the perception that Flash was fading. Murarka also had to address Microsoft's decision to go plug-in free---and therefore without Flash---on its Metro IE 10 browser. Apple's feelings---or lack of them---about Flash have been known for years.

Adobe's point is that Flash and HTML 5 will run side by side for years to come.

"We are going to keep the pace of innovation on Flash," said Murarka. "Microsoft was clear that the use case for Flash is on the desktop. Flash will run just fine on the Windows desktop."

Murarka also moved to combat the perception that Flash usage was dropping. The overall market for mobile video and applications is booming and Flash is riding along.

It's also worth noting that Flash isn't a moneymaker for Adobe, which sells developer tools. "There's a chain of value in the tools, servers and analytics to enable mobile apps," he said. Of course, Adobe is "always worried about developer interest," but the idea "that Flash is getting less popular is nothing that any of our metrics are showing."

With that backdrop, Adobe launched its Flash Player 11 and AIR 3 software. The goal appears to be to do things that HTML 5 can't quite do yet. Adobe sees its Flash and AIR platforms as ways to create content and applications across multiple platforms---Android, BlackBerry, Mac, Windows---and screens---smartphones, PCs and TVs.

Indeed, Adobe does address some key holes with its latest Flash Player and AIR releases. Among the key items:

  • Native extensions that allow developers to tap into hardware features such as light sensors, dual screens and Near Field Communications (NFC).
  • Captive runtime so developers can package AIR 3 with applications. That move will simplify installations on Android, Windows, Mac and Apple's iOS. On many platforms, a user would have to download AIR separately to run an app.
  • Content protection that enables services like TV Everywhere as well as rental and subscription support.
  • Improved video and 2D/3D support.

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Topics: Windows, Apps, Enterprise Software, Operating Systems, Software, Software Development

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39 comments
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  • ..mmmm

    ... i dunno.

    I notice Murarka, conveniently, doesn't talk about the swiss cheese vulnerabilities of Adobe Flash and a 'certain other product' Adobe develops. Fix the major security problems or just save yourselves the trouble and relegate your products to the pages of history, Adobe.
    thx-1138_
    • RE: Adobe launches Flash Player 11 over concerns about its future

      @thx-1138_@... Flash is a giant trojan. And if they include more "native extensions" that bypass system security and communicate to hardware directly, it will mean even more security holes to exploit.

      And to top it off, Flash is essentially spyware, reporting detailed and personalized data back to Adobe. Just put a network monitor on you link and watch it phone home with each and every Flash invocation.
      terry flores
    • Adobe should keep an eye on

      ... what Google is cooking with their new Dart initiatives. HTML/JS is not gonna threaten Flash. H/DART could.
      LBiege
  • RE: Adobe launches Flash Player 11 over concerns about its future

    That figure doesn't illustrate tons of security holes that exist in flash and ways to exploit them
    shellcodes_coder
  • Poor Flash

    Ejected by Apple to make sure apps. were released via an exclusive mechanism taking a 30% cut.

    Ejected by M$ to make sure METRO apps. were released via an exclusive mechanism taking a 30% cut.

    Anti-competitive moves by Apple and M$ not meriting even a whimper from ZDNET.

    Anti-competitive moves which the US competition authorities might get round to recognising in 5 years time and attempting to correct in 10 years time.
    jacksonjohn
    • RE: Adobe launches Flash Player 11 over concerns about its future

      @johnfenjackson@... <br>Imagine a Walmart, or some other large store, where people just walk-in, take some of the space and set-up their own small business. They pay nothing to the company - nothing for rent, electricity, advertising, waste collection, parking and so forth. That's what you are proposing!

      Apple and MS have spent a large amount of money developing their eco-systems and they've done a lot of work over the years to develop their customer base. They deserve to be recompensed. If you think that is wrong, then I suggest that you allow people to use the front yard of your home to set-up their own small business - and you won't be allowed to charge them a cent!
      Wakemewhentrollsgone
      • Two Fundamental Errors

        @ptorning
        The fundamental error you make is in the analogy with physical wares and old trading methods. Digital is different and you are behind the times in your thinking.

        The distribution mechanism is already in place: torrents. Ironically it is exactly the type of solution you propose I adopt ... set up the store in my own back yard and charge nothing for it!

        You have not yet truly embaraced the capability of the Internet and distributed systems. You wish us to remain in the past wrt to trading and distribution ... and allow global corporations to keep us there. I want to move forward.

        You also fail to recognise the balance between reasonable returns, exploitation and monopoly. Don't forget a PC is built on the combined platform of CPU, hard disk, controllers, ... should all others take a 30% cut too?

        We have all, including M$, enjoyed a symbiotic relationship between major players and ecosystem partners. I should like it to remain that way. If M$ descend to Apple's vile parasitic 30% cut mentality I will oppose their operations. I suggest you do the same ... but tis a free(ish) country.
        jacksonjohn
      • On your terms

        @ptorning
        If you want an analogy in obsolete terms ...
        ... Apple and M$ are saying there will only be two stores on the planet: their two stores.
        All digital wares (not only software in Apple's case you see) from all other suppliers must go through our two stores.
        Everybody pays 30% tax.

        Over my dead PC!
        jacksonjohn
    • RE: Adobe launches Flash Player 11 over concerns about its future

      @johnfenjackson@...

      But both support the HTML5 which they don't get a 30% cuts from. All MS have done is announce that the IE metro browser will not support plugins, that will not stop firefox shipping a browser with flash support they've just decided for performance and security reasons to not allow any plugins in IE.

      Flash is 1 large security headache brought about by the fact that Adobe are either too lazy to rewrite it or they don't see it as a problem. I for one will cheer when HTML 5 kills it
      the.nameless.drifter
    • RE: Adobe launches Flash Player 11 over concerns about its future

      @johnfenjackson@...

      IMHO, you're either a little foolish or your income is somehow dependent upon Flash.

      Based upon the fact that Flash has been labeled the new "Vista" with respect to security holes (and has been for a LONG time), Apple & MS have decided not to allow Flash plug-ins. Personally, I think this is an excellent decision on their part (on the MS IE side of the equation, long overdue). It seems that I'm getting Flash updates every few days -- that many updates can't mean enhancements -- they're vulnerability fixes. No matter how Adobe tries to spin it, it's still putting lipstick on a pig.

      Anti-competitive?? If Flash were more secure, I doubt we're reading or posting comments on this thread.

      To use the analogy of letting someone setup business in your backyard -- if doing so created a vulnerability which made it easier for a thief to break into your home and your hard earned possessions were stolen, would you still allow it?? I doubt it. Flash is that vulnerability!
      jimsj
      • RE: Adobe launches Flash Player 11 over concerns about its future

        @jimsj If security holes had anything to do with this, Microsoft would have disallowed most releases of its own browser from its operating system. The OS vendor doesn't get to decide for the user what 3rd party applications are good or not good for their personal systems, period.
        jgm@...
    • Right. Because writing content that is 100% beholden

      to whatever operating system and hardware platform Adobe chooses to support is a utopia of open-ness.

      Let's identify what's really got you hot and bothered: You're a flash developer and you see people caring less and less about your skill set.
      baggins_z
    • I see that as freedom, though.

      @johnfenjackson@...

      Apple & Microsoft have the *freedom* to choose not to integrate Adobe's proprietary product into their OSs (although Apple is *much* more restrictive about it than Microsoft).

      Just as *you* have the choice to pick a non-Apple or non-Microsoft OS for your smartphone if you want to have Flash capability. Apple & Microsoft aren't forcing you to buy their particular smartphones, after all.
      spdragoo@...
    • RE: Adobe launches Flash Player 11 over concerns about its future

      @johnfenjackson@...
      "The fundamental error you make is in the analogy with physical wares and old trading methods. Digital is different and you are behind the times in your thinking."

      "The distribution mechanism is already in place: torrents. Ironically it is exactly the type of solution you propose I adopt ... set up the store in my own back yard and charge nothing for it!"

      You have no idea what you are talking about and you still do not see the fundamental problem with your own discussion. It does not matter if it is a physical store or an e-store.

      Go ahead and set-up your e-store. But remember, you have to let anyone who wants to use on your site to do so for free. You pay for the servers, the software, the electricity, the marketing, advertising, customer development and so forth and they pay you nothing in return. You pay to host their business for nothing. That is what you are advocating! So, off you go; develop your brilliant business model and watch yourself go broke in no time fast.
      Wakemewhentrollsgone
    • Too bad that Flash is indeed the slow, lazy, glitchy resource hog, so ...

      @johnfenjackson@... accusing both Apple and Microsoft leads nowhere. Flash has to die, alas; it deserves it.
      DDERSSS
  • I just love it when I go to web site ...

    ... after web site, and my browser freezes for up to a minute in some cases (on my lower end laptop) while all the flash controls on the web pages suck away the CPU cycles of my PC. As far as I'm concerned, flash is the non-malware scourge of the web.
    P. Douglas
    • ... on the other hand ...

      ... a goodly majority have managed to find a relaible PC configuration where they go to web site after web site enjoying fine graphic content, even if delivered slowly.

      OK, so Flash can be flaky and needs constant updates ... but many people think its worth it. I would be very happy if HTML5 solved all those probems.

      But in the meantime I woud like the option, the choice of using Flash. So I am sure would the vast number of sites who will have to recode their main applications when the new HTML5 standards and functionality arrives.

      In the meantime the vital lesson learned by M$ with VISTA is to preserve compatibility whilst the transition occurs.

      I think M$ learnt that lesson: W8 Developer Edition looks good. But removing plugins from METRO is an anti-competitive move and has nothing to do with stability, security or performance: that's just the excuse for the dirty manouevre.
      jacksonjohn
      • Old Code Base

        @johnfenjackson@...
        The code base in Flash is old and rotten. That's the real issue, and Adobe can't or won't justify the expense of replacing it. "Updates" won't go far to preserve their market share.
        tomogden
      • Anti-competitive to *who*?

        @johnfenjackson@...

        They didn't say, "We're not going to allow Adobe Flash plug-ins, but all other plug-ins are OK", & they didn't say "No browser running under Metro's UI will be allowed to run any plug-ins", they just said that IE10 *under Metro* will not allow plug-ins from *any* source to run. That would mean Microsoft plug-ins as well.

        And again, they also didn't say the user can't download *other* browsers that would run plug-ins in Metro.
        spdragoo@...
  • RE: Adobe launches Flash Player 11 over concerns about its future

    until html5 can offer some form of drm I don't think you have to worry much about flash dying out. Who is going to expend great effort making html5 games when their code is wide open for copying. Are movie studios going to release drm-free html5 movies, nah. Flash has a whole lot of life in it yet.
    matjam