Adobe's Photoshop Express and the big picture

Adobe's Photoshop Express and the big picture

Summary: Adobe on Thursday unveiled the beta of Photoshop Express, a Webtop version of its photo editing juggernaut.Depending on who you listen to Photoshop Express is either a worthwhile contender in a market that includes a bunch of Web photo editing tools or an instant also ran that won't threaten any of the upstarts nibbling at Adobe's heels (Techmeme).

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Adobe on Thursday unveiled the beta of Photoshop Express, a Webtop version of its photo editing juggernaut. Depending on who you listen to Photoshop Express is either a worthwhile contender in a market that includes a bunch of Web photo editing tools or an instant also ran that won't threaten any of the upstarts nibbling at Adobe's heels (Techmeme). Webware's Lori Grunin has a good review of the Photoshop Express beta (gallery at right). Photoshop Express offers 2 GB of storage for free. But there is a bigger picture here. Adobe is trying to tackle multiple fronts with Photoshop Express (see official statement). Among the key motives: Adobe is trying to make the Photoshop brand Webby. Adobe's Photoshop desktop software is a staple among creative professionals. It's also pricey and has more features than any average user can possibly figure out. Express gives Adobe a starter product and the plan is to get folks to trade up to Elements and then the full-blown Photoshop. Grunin writes:

Photoshop Express is two things: a photo-sharing site targeting the millions of snapshot photographers who think software such as Photoshop Elements is too difficult, too disconnected or just too much, and a platform from which Adobe will serve partner sites with editing tools.

Photoshop Express just has to be good enough. While Adobe's beta is likely to be buggy it doesn't have to be perfect. All it has to do is be as good as what's out there. This is really about the Webtop. What's Adobe's real game here? Making Flex and AIR the Webtop development standard. Creating Webtop versions of Adobe's staple software is a great way to demonstrate the future of rich Internet applications. Frankly, I wouldn't mind a little more of Adobe's creative suite to be launched in Webtop versions.
It's a mindshare game right now. Adobe's platforms (all resources), which are roughly standards on the Web, are under fire from multiple fronts. Microsoft's Silverlight could be a threat to Adobe's platform. By product line there are always smaller players aiming at Adobe. By launching Webtop versions, hooking into partners like Facebook and being relevant, Adobe can leverage its existing brands. Anyone that has heard of Photoshop--basically everyone--will at least give Photoshop Express a spin.

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14 comments
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  • Not me bro'

    I had a quick peek but thought it was way over done, flash
    everywhere = slow and how about getting the TOS front and
    center before signing up?
    dahowlett9
  • RE: Adobe's Photoshop Express and the big picture

    Gimp is better than photoshop anyways, and it's free. Adobe is a terrible company. They've ruined Flash since they bought it and aren't keeping up with free tools that are outperforming their extremely expensive, overprices software.
    spintz
    • Corel bought Jasc when it comes to Paint Shop Pro!

      Corel lost me as a customer because of the implementation of the activation scheme that I must activate Paint Shop Pro 10. As far as I know, Jasc didn't implement activation technology into Paint Shop Pro. Only a serial number required...

      When you activate too many times, guess what? You'll have to contact Corel, which I didn't bother because I'm hearing impaired and that I feel like a criminal when I e-mail Corel, on which I won't bother with that, either...

      Thus, I'm a happy customer of Jasc before Corel bought them...

      There's Paint.net available for Windows (http://www.getpaint.net/). I found it comfortable to use the GUI than GIMP.
      Grayson Peddie
    • Thoughts of a freeloader

      "Gimp is better than photoshop anyways"

      Yeah, sure... maybe the freeloading amateurs out there think it is, but to professionals who actually use these packages for a living, Gimp writers would have to pay us to use it... and believe me, they couldn't afford the amount they would have to pay. Like the majority of the "free" stuff out there, it's garbage.

      It's a package written by people who haven't got the first clue about usability. Which again pretty much describes most of the free packages out there. Programmers who think they are designers/artists, that are too busy trying to prove how clever they are, to actually consider the fact people might want to use the damned thing.

      And how have Adobe ruined Flash exactly? Please explain what aspects of Flash have been ruined and how. I'll grant you that they have ruined Director, but then again, Director was 80% broken before they got hold of it, so there wasn't much hope really.

      As a Flash developer, I find Flash a very productive language. Admittedly, bad Flash is terrible, but then again, so is bad C++ or bad Java. 99% of people don't know if the Flash on the page is good or bad. Which is why you end up with stupid statements like, "Flash everywhere = slow". No! "Bad Flash everywhere = slow", there's a difference, but I don't expect people on here to know what it is, or be able to spot it... this is ZDNet after all.

      If Adobe weren't so busy shipping code packages to cheap-labour countries to develop, all for a quick buck, and then expecting decent products in return, they might stand a better chance. While ever these companies keep relying on Indian "production line" development, they are going to keep getting things that are "finished", rather than things that are "finished and working".

      If you've ever used an India based call centre, you have a good idea of how it works. Yes, they can answer the phones, but once they have done that, it all falls apart. If it isn't on the "quick-fix" script, then they haven't got a clue.
      LeeC
  • RE: Adobe's Photoshop Express and the big picture

    I love the interjection at the end:
    "Anyone that has heard of Photoshop???basically everyone???will at least give Photoshop Express a spin."

    I own Photoshop (v.4 onward), but also a variety of other tools, which tend to be used more frequently.

    That said, am I ready -- or am I likely -- to run to Photoshop Express to try it out? Nope.
    techrepublicaaa1
    • Precisely

      Anyone who places any value on their images, will work offline, and store their images offline. If they want to show them, then they'll be hosted on a controlled and secure server, well away from the grasp of Adobe.

      I think this is another example of how the "all I do is just edit text files" mentality is influencing the net these days. Just because Office Bob plays with documents, with his head in some cloud, people think everyone will do the same thing. Yeah, sure I'll edit this 4096 x 4096, 300 Dpi image on a web based app... in dreamland maybe.

      I wouldn't touch PSE with a barge pole, or any other web based app for that matter.
      LeeC
  • RE: Adobe's Photoshop Express and the big picture

    I disagree.
    Oh Boy!
  • RE: Adobe's Photoshop Express and the big picture

    brilliant brilliant idea as far as air distribution goes.
    hypoxia3
  • Well, it'll be a while before that replaces proper Photoshop...

    When will a 64-bit version come out? Trying to edit a 80MB file over the web is just... dumb.
    HypnoToad
  • Wow, read the terms of service.

    Would you use this app if you actually read the terms of service?

    [i]"Adobe does not claim ownership of Your Content. However, with respect to Your Content that you submit or make available for inclusion on publicly accessible areas of the Services, [b]you grant Adobe a worldwide, royalty-free, nonexclusive, perpetual, irrevocable, and fully sublicensable license to use, distribute, derive revenue or other remuneration from, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, publicly perform and publicly display such Content (in whole or in part) and to incorporate such Content into other Materials or works in any format or medium now known or later developed.[/b]"[/i]

    Wow! Just wow! In plain english, this means adobe can do whatever the hell they want with any pic you upload. They can use it to make money and you won't get a penny. Nice.
    kraterz
    • What are the ...

      ... "publicly accessible areas of the Services"?
      markbn
    • Agreed - that's ugly

      It won't be a big deal to someone who will be happy to claim their small slice of fame with "Hey, Adobe chose my image". But I'm guessing they'd be less thrilled if it turned out to be a runaway success generating millions and they never got a cent. Also, if an image got snagged for use in a way the originator didn't agree with or thought wasn't flattering, it could be a nightmare.
      ejhonda
    • Public content

      "Your Content that you submit or make available for inclusion on publicly accessible areas of the Services"

      Yes, that is the key. How do they define public. Do you have the right to password protect access to your photos? If so, then anything you protect should be private, any unprotected (public) could be used by others. Sounds like typical copyright information. If you don't protect your material then anyone has rights to it.
      Kansan52
  • web based apps

    web based apps are garbage outside of business environments.
    vi0l3t1975