An antidote for blogs attacks

An antidote for blogs attacks

Summary: I don't want to address the Forbes cover story, "Attack of the Blogs," that characterized blogs as "the prized platform of an online lynch mob spouting liberty but spewing lies, libel and invective."  Long before blogs, plain old Web sites (POWS) were used to promote various agendas using underhanded techniques, joining print, radio, TV, etc.

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TOPICS: Browser
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I don't want to address the Forbes cover story, "Attack of the Blogs," that characterized blogs as "the prized platform of an online lynch mob spouting liberty but spewing lies, libel and invective."  Long before blogs, plain old Web sites (POWS) were used to promote various agendas using underhanded techniques, joining print, radio, TV, etc. as abused mediums. Just watch an episode of fictional West Wing, follow the travails of I. Lewis "Scooter" Libby or read your favorite leftist or rightist rag. Blogs may make it easier to gang tackle, but the grandstanding Forbes article focuses on the relatively few number of dirty tricks bloggers, without telling the other side of the story. I'll refer you to Doc Searls' post, covering Steve Rubel's with assorted links, and Shel Israel's open letter. An an antidote to the "Attack of Blog," I'd recommend reading (when it's available) "Naked Conversations: How Blogs are Changing the Way Businesses Talk with Customers" by the aforementioned Shel Israel and Robert Scoble  (Wiley, 2006). I read a pre-release copy over the weekend and it covers the blog bases with real-world examples and insights for anyone who might have a stake in communicating, or conversing, in an era in which subjects (people, places, things) can be exposed and laid bare at Internet scale, and participation and honesty rather than obfuscation and subterfuge hopefully prevail.

Topic: Browser

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  • Bloggers were right, Main Stream Media was wrong

    If it weren't for the bloggers, the Main Stream Media would continue to be able to make things up and get away with it.

    It took the bloggers to call CBS on their lie. The "professionals" were wrong and the pajama clad bloggers were right. Dan Rather actually got away with the first "Rather-gate" lie before bloggers existed.
    http://www.nationalreview.com/comment/morse200409150552.asp
    george_ou
    • Perhaps would this should tell us is...

      ...that we should be far more critical of information we receive from all avenues. Bloggers, news media, and Government alike. As the old saying goes, believe none of what you hear and half of what you see.
      Zinoron
      • The educational role

        The way we handle information is greatly influenced by our surroundings while we grow up and become adults.
        Arnout Groen
      • Being more critical

        As much as we hear of how the bloggers will cause a revolution in journalism, I have to wonder how they could do so, exactly. It's possible that they could either report stories that newspapers and "wires" missed/ignored, or perhaps provide an alternate perspective on a particular event or issue.

        And bloggers certainly have exposed things that may not have been exposed otherwise, such as the Killian memos, the apparent misinterpretation of FDR by Brit Hume, and the (ahem) exposure of "Jeff Gannon." Honestly, some of the better bloggers I've read have been the "mainstream media" bloggers, whether Joe Scarborough or Keith Olbermann (particularly some of his more political stuff, such as his "Nexus of Politics and Terror" story), because they honestly seem a bit more grounded than most other bloggers do.

        That said, a lot of bloggers (at least Sturgeon's 90%) either have nothing of real consequence to say (dabbling largely in either cat photos or various fanfiction) or suffer from a stubborn exceptionalism (believing that the hubris that felled various mainstream media folks would [i]never[/i] claim them as its next victim).
        Third of Five