An antidote for phishing you can't have

An antidote for phishing you can't have

Summary: During this morning's PC Forum session, the articulate Symantec CEO John Thompson was talking about how the industry is address the scourge of phishing attacks, which are out of control.

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TOPICS: Malware
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During this morning's PC Forum session, the articulate Symantec CEO John Thompson was talking about how the industry is address the scourge of phishing attacks, which are out of control. He cited a bank that has been very successful fighting phishing attacks

Topic: Malware

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7 comments
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  • Why not?

    I don't see the problem.

    If someone invents a cure to a horrible disease, they can get a patent on it good for more than 20 years that lets them charge whatever they want. That is [b]exactly[/b] the way the system is supposed to work.

    I rather suspect that they've got patent applications in the works for both the technology and the business methods, and again that's exactly the way the system is supposed to work.

    It used to be called the American Dream, but now it's gone global: find a way to use the system so that you can get paid without having to actually deliver anything, just collect checks as they come in. When someone finds a way to do it, though, the people who were late to the land rush whine.
    Yagotta B. Kidding
    • YBK: is that you?

      Sensible and accurate.

      Except that in some parts of the world they don't expect to live on licensing fees. Those are the places where the licenses are bought and products produced.
      You'll have to take a tour sometime. Strange ambience.
      Anton Philidor
  • Maybe the FDA needs to get involved...

    Think about that analogy - saying that keeping their security work proprietary is like "a company finding a cure for a disease and then refusing to share it". Like not sharing a vaccine to a known virus. So, if cures should be shared freely, how dare McAfee, Symantec, etc keep their anti-virus/spyware code proprietary, and not open-source it?

    Maybe we should expire their software patents like the FDA does with new drugs, and release their source code to the "generic" software market after they've had a chance to earn back their R&D money?

    Actually, that's not such a bad idea....
    jcassella
  • if this phishing condom is soooo important ...

    then the federal government can declare imminent domain and use the new security laws to force the bank fo fork over the cure.

    yo.
    wessonjoe
  • Have you considered

    Has anyone considered that this is vaporware and does not exist.Could this just be a PR scam and that there is no program to produce??
    JimG
    graphix_z
  • I wouldn't consider the FDA the model for anything.

    Keep the government out of it. If you want open source antivirus applications, start one on your own and convince the market that your solution is better.
    shadar
  • What?!?

    I can't believe anyone would want to abrogation of their rights for an entity to keep private works to themselves, especially something this trivial in the grand scheme of things.

    W/regard to patent expiration--I doubt you want to wait 20 years for this technology. And yes, it might apply, IF they file a patent, and patent/copyright law does not change (Disney?). Not everyone who creates proprietary technology for internal use wants to be in the software development business, and have all the costs and support associated with it. How much would you have the government mandate they have to sell it for, after they force them to bring it to market?

    There are lots of bright minds out there, come up with a better solution!
    PunkAssOtch