Analyst says financial analysts don

Analyst says financial analysts don

Summary: Ovum analyst Neil Ward-Dutton dismisses financial analysts who expect the IT industry to have a big recovery and return to significant spending. He says this kind of thinking is just plain wrong: There will be no big 'recovery', because IT is increasingly becoming part of the furniture of business - and as a consequence, IT spending is being controlled and prioritized just like any other spending.

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TOPICS: Tech Industry
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Ovum analyst Neil Ward-Dutton dismisses financial analysts who expect the IT industry to have a big recovery and return to significant spending. He says this kind of thinking is just plain wrong:

There will be no big 'recovery', because IT is increasingly becoming part of the furniture of business - and as a consequence, IT spending is being controlled and prioritized just like any other spending. When economic and market conditions force businesses to rein in expenditure, IT is throttled back just as much - and in many cases, even more - than any other type of expenditure.

Topic: Tech Industry

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  • Hidden costs

    I'm a Verizon customer. With Verizon, I get unlimited local and long distance (ULL) for a fixed fee (land line). My wife loves it and takes advantage of it by talking to family and friends all over the US. I also get a $5 per month discount on DSL because of the of the ULL service.

    To switch to VOIP, I'd have to keep the land line and pay $5 more per month for VOIP, unless I use Verizon VOIP ($29.95 instead of $34.95 for unlimited service).

    I'd have to keep a phone hooked up to my regular phone line so I could call 911 (not normally an added cost but maybe not as flexible if I have only one phone hooked up).

    There's also the cost of phones, since ordinary phones won't work (but I suppose you could change your house wiring - another cost - and then you couldn't call 911). Verizon provides an adapter that you can connect to an expandable cordless phone base, so you can use cordless phones anywhere in your house.
    ron_cleaver@...
    • That's Verizon screwing you ...

      If your only broadband option is DSL, you're pretty much screwed by the phone companies. It's technically possible to provide DSL without regular phone service (naked DSL), but few offer it now, and due to recent court decisions saying that state laws requiring it are unenforceable, those who can get it now could easilly lose that option.

      Since I already had a combination of services (Cable, land-line, cell phone, broadband), it was an easy choice to save money by getting cable broadband and VoIP.
      As for costs, my $25 VoIP plan plus all taxes (one) and fees (none) equals just over $27 / mo. Verizon 'Freedom' costs $50 in my area, plus all the taxes, fees, regional service charges, brings the total closer to $60. You might live in a part of the country where Verizon has a lower rate, but it ain't here. Also, the Verizon price includes up to 3 common calling features (there's a spendier plan with up to 5 features too). My VoIP plan includes all the common calling features, plus some that I've never seen with a land line.

      In my area, my VoIP does call into the emergency dispatch center (presumably using an alternate 10-digit number to route to it) - I've dialed it once due to someone down the street, it works. Even if it didn't I had cell service before VoIP and still have it now.

      Last, ordinary phones work fine with VoIP. No idea where you got that one. To "change your house wiring" takes under 5 minutes to disconnect the Verizon lines at the phone box. It's so simple anyone can do it. and if you wanted to hire a handyman to do it, they could accomplish it in a matter of minutes, very little one-time charge. You can then connect your VoIP into your existing house's phone wiring. Or if you have one, you can connect it directly into an expandable cordless phone base so you can use cordless phones anywhere in your house. Your choice, no need to replace what you have.
      ac2_z
  • IMHO VoIP Is Just The Flavor of The Month

    First comment (which applies to other ZDNet bloggers/columnists, too): please link to the article you're discussing. Not just to the main page or to dead links. Both of which are in this article.

    Second - you don't need naked DSL or a phone. You can get basic phone service (no caller ID/forwarding/special rings) + DSL (where DSL is available) for @$40/month (at least in North. Calif.). You don't need to plug in a phone - just connect the PC and pay the bill.

    Third - you can make free calls over the www via most of the free messenger services. Both PCs just need a mic and speakers or a headphone plugged in. I talk to people all over the world for nothing.

    Fourth - If you have to have a phone, get a cell phone. 911 is part of the service. With a cell, you don't need number portability. I've had the same number for 10 years. Most cell companies now offer free long distance, a bucket of free minutes, plus free weekend/evening minutes. If you travel on business, your company should pick up the charges for business related calls (and you can plan your personal calls for the free minutes in your cell plan). If you move a lot, well that's a different problem and VoIP might be for you.

    I have yet to see a cogent argument for shelling out additional money for VoIP in addition to the DSL and phone you need to use it anyway. It doesn't in any real way improve phone service.

    Brent
    DaffyDuck
    • I save money w/ VoIP - no additional money.

      [i]you don't need naked DSL or a phone. You can get basic phone service (no caller ID/forwarding/special rings) + DSL for @$40/month[/i]
      - for that price ($40) I can get cable broadband, which in my area is more reliable than DSL and has more than twice the available download speed, plus VoIP (including all taxes comes to just over $27) which does come with caller ID, voice mail, call forwarding, 3-way calling, web interface to see a record of inbound/outbound calls, web interface to check voice mail messages, etc, too many services to list. Lets compare costs. You: DSL, Basic phone (how much is taxes/fees?), & cell totals what after you add in taxes and fees? $90? $100? More? Me: Broadband, VoIP, basic cell, totals $73, or $80 with all taxes & fees.

      [i]"you can make free calls over the www via most of the free messenger services."[/i]
      - works great if both parties have a PC and both are turned on. With VoIP, I can call their land line (free long distance w/ VoIP) and talk to them, even if their (or my) PC is turned off.

      [i]If you have to have a phone, get a cell phone.[/i]
      - works great if you want to talk 1-1; a bit more of a hassle if more than one person at each house wants to be on the phone at the same time (such as me and the wife wanting to talk to both of her parents with all on the phone at once - or both my parents wanting to talk to my sister and her kids with all on the phone at once). That's part of why I have multiple phones in the house, and why one's a speakerphone - all of which are standard phone technology and all of which are connected to my VoIP service via the existing household wiring. My cell service is a stripped down emergency plan that run under $10/mo - includes very few minutes, but is only for emergency use if the car breaks down, etc - so I don't need a lot of minutes (had it before switching land line to VoIP).

      Granted, how I use my telecom services may not be the same for others. Everyone needs to look at what makes sense for them, it will vary in different situations. A single person calling out at a time would certainly be able to get by with only a cell phone, provided you don't mind running upstairs when the cell rings because you left it on your night stand.
      ac2_z