Apple U.S. market share hits 5 percent

Apple U.S. market share hits 5 percent

Summary: Fueled by a 30 percent year-over-year growth rate Apple shipments hit 741,000 units in the first quarter, up from 570,000 units from a year ago. And according to Gartner, that tally equates to 5 percent market share in the U.

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TOPICS: Apple
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Fueled by a 30 percent year-over-year growth rate Apple shipments hit 741,000 units in the first quarter, up from 570,000 units from a year ago.

And according to Gartner, that tally equates to 5 percent market share in the U.S. PC market, up a percentage point from this time a year ago.

As far as growth goes, Apple grew the fastest of the U.S. PC makers in shipments with a 30 percent growth rate (Techmeme). Toshiba grew at a 26.8 percent clip in shipments with Hewlett-Packard delivering growth of 25.8 percent. Toshiba and Apple, however, are working off of much smaller bases.

Dell had a rough time in the first quarter as market share plunged from 33.9 percent to 27.9 percent. Shipment growth for Dell was down 15.5 percent.  First quarter market share stats are at left.

Globally, HP was top dog with market share of 17.6 percent, followed by Dell at 13.9 percent. Acer had 6.8 market share followed by Lenovo at 6.3 percent. 

Topic: Apple

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  • Very impressive for Apple

    Considering most of their sales DON'T go to enterprise markets whereas most sales
    of HP and Dell DO.
    frgough
    • You may be surprised...

      [i]most of their sales DON'T go to enterprise markets[/i]

      While I do agree a significantly large percentage of HP and Dell purchases are to the enterprise market, you may be surprised at just how many Macs are corporate purchases for the publishing and graphic industries. It would be interesting to see the numbers comparing corporate to consumer purchases.
      3D0G
      • Graphics and Publishing

        Are a tiny, tiny, tiny fraction of U.S. business.
        frgough
        • It's goliath

          Most people simply have no understanding about how huge this market area is.

          Most people only think of magazines and newspaper. It?s far from complete.

          Go into any store and look at all the products ? all packaged ? all designed ? all different. Billions and billions of dollars spent on that every year on design and production.

          Bags ? grocery, dept. store, shopping, etc. More billions

          Labels ? even price labels

          Every catalog, flyers, supermarket sale brochures, the junk mail that you get every day, and the ad supplements that come with Sunday papers. The amount of just photoshop work on one weekly supermarket flyer is tremendous. Another billions and billions.

          Traffic signs, store signs, and all other signs.

          Posters & billboards

          Greeting cards. More billions

          Every single book ? with its cover designed separately. More billions.

          Logos and all business stationary along with signage on things like trucks, etc. More billions

          Those giant video screens in places like Times Square (an area where we?ve supplied a good bit of still content).

          Professional photo retouching for distribution in all media

          Then we have ads, whether delivered in print, web, video.

          Then we have video and movie production. I cannot begin to estimate the size of that market.

          Another way to look at things is that Adobe is the second largest packaged software company in the world and has been for years. Their whole business has been based on supplying the professional tools for the above.

          Macs are dominate in many of the above and are common in all. Apple?s problem is that, for much of the above, you do not need the latest and greatest hardware, nor does it speed up the work that much (thinking takes up the most time). Video is the one exception. They also tend to be well built so replacement of failed hardware is not that common. In our case, we only have a few machines newer than 3 years and some are approaching 10 years. We?ve only had 2 Apple hardware failures since we?ve been using them.
          j.m.galvin
  • 5% is a misleading figure...

    5% is a misleading figure, considering the majority of Apple's products end up on a desktop at home. HP, Dell, et al. include Point of Sale systems, ATM machines, industrial machinery, and embedded systems as part of their sales figures, since they don't differentiate between such systems and consumer desktop machines.

    That 5% is even more impressive when you consder the aforementioned.
    olePigeon
  • How high does Apple's marketshare need to be...

    How high does Apple's (or should I say Mac OS's) marketshare need to be, before the monopoly label is removed from Microsoft? 5% of PC shipments shipping with Mac OS seems to prove that there are indeed viable alternatives to Windows, and that the reasoning behind excluding Mac OS from the "relevant market" was pure bunk.
    PB_z
    • That depends on the openness of file formats.

      "How high does Apple's (or should I say Mac OS's) marketshare need to be, before
      the monopoly label is removed from Microsoft?"

      I would say when I am no longer told I need a PC running Windows and a copy of
      MS Office in order to attend basic college courses. Or when I can open any
      document sent to me by our administrators without losing formatting with any OS
      and any document reader.

      Microsoft was not found guilty of having a monopoly. They were found guilty of
      illegally leveraging it into other areas. It is not the OS, programs or hardware that
      allows lock in to occur, it is the file formats. Apple could have 99% of market share
      but as long as the file formats were open then any company could compete on the
      merits of its design and ease of use.
      Zoraster
      • Yeah right....

        [i]Apple could have 99% of market share but as long as the file formats were open then any company could compete on the merits of its design and ease of use.[/i]

        Success in this country doesn't get you rewarded, it gets you a lawsuit for monopolistic business practices, filed by your wannabe competitors who don't like it because they have a crappy product and aren't as successful as you are.

        (This is a general observation, not one of those lame abm/nbm tard-posts.)
        Hallowed are the Ori
        • Crappy?

          You mean crappy, as in dated Fisher Price looking OS that gets in your way when trying to work? MS writes crappy code and copies, buys out or crushed those who showed innovation. They ARE convicted criminals and have been found guilty more then once.
          Success means you achieve your goals by being better then your competitor. MS has not proven to be better, just a childish bully.
          observer1959
          • Hmmm.... I certainly hope that you were...

            ...in such a rush to trot out a rebuttal to something you assumed I was talking about that you didn't finish reading my post. The last line in it read:

            [b](This is a general observation, not one of those lame abm/nbm tard-posts.)[/b]

            That line was intended to let anyone with two functioning neurons to rub together know that I was not talking about any company in particular. So as I say, I certainly hope you were just in a hurry and didn't read that line. Otherwise...



            .
            Hallowed are the Ori
          • I truly hope you are not representative

            of the Apple community in general. Your post reads as that of misinformation and innuendos.

            If Apple were truly as brilliant and innovative as you claim, why did they not open their system to cloning like the PC? Why did they change their minds at the last minute?.

            [I]Success means you achieve your goals by being better then your competitor.[/I]

            Are we to assume that given fair competition, they may not be "successful"? (I have even read some statements from Linus Torvalds where as he is not all too impressed with OSX's underlying components)

            I would not be surprised if the delay of Leopard was to allow time to incorporated some ideas taken from Vista.
            GuidingLight
          • misinformation and innuendo

            ((( If Apple were truly as brilliant and innovative as you claim,
            why did they not open their system to cloning like the PC? )))

            Your question makes no sense. Apple can't be innovative if they
            don't license their operating system? Huh? Apple is innovative
            precisely because they control every aspect of the Macintosh,
            from the hardware to the software and operating system.

            ((( I would not be surprised if the delay of Leopard was to allow
            time to incorporated [sic] some ideas taken from Vista. )))

            Like what? I'm sure there must be some feature of Vista that is
            not already in OS X Tiger, or on Leopard's publicly disclosed
            feature list, but I can't think of any.
            buddhistMonkey
          • Innovation?

            buddhistMonkey:

            GuidingLight wrote (and you quoted):

            "((( I would not be surprised if the delay of Leopard was to allow
            time to incorporated [sic] some ideas taken from Vista. )))"

            You responded:

            "Like what? I'm sure there must be some feature of Vista that is
            not already in OS X Tiger, or on Leopard's publicly disclosed
            feature list, but I can't think of any."

            I can name the most important idea: Time Machine. It's an integrated application which will allow 10.5 Leopard to create "restore points" and perform full and sequential backups.

            Windows XP has had the ability to create "restore points" for six years. All versions of Vista can create "restore points". Vista Ultimate has full and sequential backup capabilities, plus scheduling for the latter.

            THAT'S what Apple is copying from Vista.

            I also understand that they've tweaked the Aqua interface so it's almost as nice as Vista's Aero. :)

            The unofficial rumor is that the latest beta of Leopard was too buggy, more so than the previous one, and needed a big dose of Black Flag. That may or may not be true. But it sounds accurate enough.
            M.R. Kennedy
          • I wouldn't take any post here as representative of anything.

            Excluding Linus of course.
            [i](I have even read some statements from Linus Torvalds where as he is not all too impressed with OSX's underlying components)[/i]

            What would you expect a competitor to say.
            Tigertank
          • On the Success

            Better at what? Marketing? Microsoft is great at marketing. Apple was terrible at marketing. Anyone remember the add targeting IBM in the 80s. IBM wasn't even a threat to APPLE, Microsoft was yet they missed the boat big time there.

            Today I'd have to give Apple the credit for better marketing. Apple stands at point where they could take the PC market. Microsoft has little to fear here becasue Windows is what would run beside OS X. The best of both worlds.

            I don't care much for this prediction as I like building my own PC. I'd hate to see that disappear but if Apple plays thier cards right they do offer something the competition doesn't and can't, that being OS X.
            voska
          • Not Criminal

            It was civil and they lost thier case on some points but not all. So Microsoft was found to illegally leveraging thier monopoly status in only a few of the counts brought against them.

            You can't charge corporations with crimes as they aren't people. You can sue a corporation though for money and you criminally charge people who work for the corporation like the CEO but you can't actually charge Microsoft with a crime and therefore they can't be convicted.
            voska
          • Actually, a company can be charged criminally

            The US gov't. did just that with Arthur Andersen in relation to Enron. Andersen then went out of the accounting bus.

            Under US Code, improper use of monopoly can also be prosecuted as a felony. I don't think that's ever been used though.
            j.m.galvin
          • re: Crappy?

            lantzn:

            You said:

            "MS writes crappy code and copies, buys out or crushed those who showed innovation."

            Kindly remind everyone here just how buggy OS X 10.0 and 10.1 were. Also kindly remind everyone here just how many bugs were squashed and holes were patched in OS X 10.3 and 10.4 in the first quarter of 2007 *alone*. That number does not include the latest set of 45 patches that were issued this week. Crappy, buggy code? Yeah, that Apple you've been eating has a lot of worms in it.

            And if you think that Apple does not copy features that appeared in Windows (or other operating systems) first, or that Apple does not purchase other companies to acquire their technology so that it can be tipped into the Mac OS, you bloody well have anothter think coming. Apple innovates in the computer arena far less than you think. And to prove this, take a look at the list of new features that are slated to be part of 10.5 Leopard--the ones that have *any* real importance at all are already in use. In Windows Vista Ultimate. (Do I hear another chorus of "Cupertino, Start Your Copiers" playing in the background?)

            You also said:

            "Success means you achieve your goals by being better then your competitor. MS has not proven to be better, just a childish bully."

            Really? At what point during the past 23 years has Apple been successful by being "better"? When the iPod became their highest-grossing product? When the original Macintosh was introduced? When Apple scrambled to finally produce a "color" Mac (the Mac LC) because PC compatibles had already had color displays for several years? When Apple strangled and finally pulled the plug on the product line (the Apple II series) that made the company world-famous just because Steve Jobs *hated* it for its profitability and loyal user base?

            And what about being a childish bully? I remember lawsuits that Apple Computer filed against companies which had legally (by the definitions of the day) cloned the Apple II, and the much more recent ones against those who had found a way to successfully run the Mac OS on non-Apple system boards.

            Oh yes. And the string of "Mac vs. PC" commercials which are, at best, disingenuous. That is a company that is running scared, Bubba. They're scared that people *will* buy Vista PCs and find that they can be just as productive and creative using Vista as they can be with a Mac.

            Say it ain't so? It *is* so.

            At the beginning of your rant you said:

            "You mean crappy, as in dated Fisher Price looking OS that gets in your way when trying to work?"

            Remember, according to *you*, Microsoft copies. Well, if the Vista Aero interface is a "copy" of the Mac Aqua interface, then Microsoft did a fine job of copying it and made it look much better, to boot. And Vista doesn't "get in your way". The only time that the much-denigrated (especially by people who have never used it) User Access Control (UAC) "gets in the way" for me is if I want to run a system-level program (such as O&O Defrag) or when I am installing a new application. It takes me less than 2 seconds to give Vista the okey-doke to continue performing the operation or to cancel it, and I have yet to have a reason to cancel.

            With the exception of my *opinion* of the Aero interface, everything I have said here is true and factual. What you have said is bushwah. The next time you feel like spouting off, make sure you have the facts in front of you. And know what you are talking about, because so far, you most certainly do not.
            M.R. Kennedy
      • Try OSX and Microsoft Office duh

        NT
        mrlinux
    • Monopoly Test

      When MS removes activation from their OS and drops the price $100 or more for the
      full versions, you'll know OS X or Linux has broken their monopoly hold.

      Remember, the mark of a classic monopoly is rising prices and restrictions on
      product usage.
      frgough