Apple's enterprise mojo by the numbers

Apple's enterprise mojo by the numbers

Summary: Apple delivered a blowout first quarter and shed some light on how the iPhone and iPad are quickly becoming entrenched in the enterprise. That corporate momentum means bad news for the likes of Research in Motion as well as a bevy of Android competitors.

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Apple delivered a blowout first quarter and shed some light on how the iPhone and iPad are quickly becoming entrenched in the enterprise. That corporate momentum means bad news for the likes of Research in Motion as well as a bevy of Android competitors.

On an earnings conference call following the earnings results (statement), Apple CFO Peter Oppenheimer said that the iPhone and iPad are being added to the enterprise approved device list at a rapid clip. Apple's entry point to the enterprise revolves around consumerization---the trend where employees bring their own devices to work.

Tim Cook, chief operating officer of Apple, said:

I think that the consumerization of the enterprise is one of the megatrends that are occurring. I think the most forward-looking CIOs are coming to the realization that the productivity of the person, the creativity of the employee is materially more important than everyone using the same thing. And that the ability to write apps in a simple and straightforward manner for the phone or the iPad through the SDK is an incredible thing, and you can wind up literally running your whole business off of an iPad or an iPhone. So I think the list of ideas and places that people can go there are -- were unimaginable just a few months ago. And so I see an enormous potential there. The numbers are already incredible. Think about this, the iPad started shipping in April, and we are already up to 80% of the largest companies deploying or piloting the product. This is unheard of, at least in my dealings with the enterprise over the years. Generally enterprises are much slower, much more cautious and uses things that have been in the market for a long time. I think to everyone's credit they have seen the value of this from a productivity and creativity point of view, and they are really moving fast. So I think we are just scratching the surface right now.

Here's a look at Apple's enterprise mojo by the numbers:

11: Number of large companies cited by Oppenheimer as recent adds to the enterprise iPhone bandwagon. Oppenheimer said:

Most recently Fortune 500s like Wells Fargo, Archers Daniel Midlands, DuPont, Staples, Starbucks and Genworth Financial, and Global 500 accounts such as Nissan Motor, BBVA, Standard Chartered Group and Dannon have made iPhone available to their employees.

80 percent: Portion of Fortune 100 already deploying or piloting the iPad.

65 percent: Percentage increase in Fortune 100 iPad pilots from the September to December quarters.

6: Number of recent iPad pilot programs cited by Oppenheimer. Companies with iPad pilots include: JPMorgan Chase, Cardinal Health, Wells Fargo, Archer Daniels Midland, Sears Holding and DuPont.

Related:

Topics: iPad, Smartphones, BlackBerry, Mobile OS, Android, iPhone, Consumerization, CXO, Apple, Tablets

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48 comments
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  • Meaningless ..

    Sorry but while we have piloted iPad there are many things lacking outside of how the device performs (which has gaps as well). The iPad as noted is mostly being adopted under our BYOT program. It is limited to email only and for websites that work with it (many internal ones do not). We are not procuring with corporate budget.

    We will be getting RIM Playbook by end of the month and will evalutate other options (Android, HP etc) before we determine a tablet standard (for corp procured). So to state 80% means anyting at this point and it will track to some future adoption is not reality.

    It's all there for Apple to embrace and own.

    - Remove iTunes from the mix
    - Provide corporate billing options for App procurement
    - Provide means for enterprise App stores to remove the free for all it is now
    - Help with technology roadmap for planning etc
    - Offer true enterprise support (I'm not going to ship or go to an Apple store for service)

    7+ million iPads is impressive but its a scratch of future enterprise deployment
    MobileAdmin
    • The MCSE will make their choice, only this time it will ignored

      And they still dont see it coming. A great time in IT.
      Richard Flude
      • RE: Apple's enterprise mojo by the numbers

        @Richard Flude

        Who said anything about being a MCSE or anything about Microsoft? I've been a mobility professional for 10+ years so I think I know what entails providing mobile services at the enterprise level.

        Should every company just chuck any goverance / compliance due to Apple doesn't provide it? We have BYOT in place and less then 2% of employees took advantage of it. Most employees do not want to foot the bill and support for their own technology. They are content with the tools provided by their employer. One of the main reasons for not participating in our BYOT is they prefer keeping their personal technology seperate from work technology. So I'm well aware of trends in coming or passed. Reality is sometimes different.

        BTW I've been a Apple user since my Apple IIe through a Mac Pro, use an iPhone 4 as well iPad along with a host of other mobile devices.
        MobileAdmin
      • RE: Apple's enterprise mojo by the numbers

        @MobileAdmin

        He's a troll. Just ignore it and move on.
        Hallowed are the Ori
      • Why make a claim you know nothing about?

        @Richard Flude
        Or are you going to give us another story about you being some high and mighty IT head?

        I think you're problem is that you're an Apple fanboy, and for whatever reason you're ignored, so you take it out here.

        Just my observation. :)
        John Zern
      • iPhone and iPad everywhere

        ABM is a better description, all of the systems I design/implement are *nix based.

        Yes Zern some of us have regular meetings with large enterprise customers - the growth of Apple products is obvious with senior executives. This is happening outside of IT, who's MCSEs still look for control to justify their poor performance.<br><br>MobileAdmin's 10+ years of control is coming to an end. IT is being broken up, pushed closer to users. The windows centric world is falling apart. The result is a dynamic ecosystem of products across the board, freed from the MS mindset that held it back for decades.<br><br>Users want a stable platform, but also control. Neither has been the focus of managed IT.

        As already stated, I'm happy to compare my IT experience with yours.
        Richard Flude
      • LOL!!! To summarize...

        @Richard Flude
        [i]MobileAdmin's 10+ years of control is coming to an end. IT is being broken up, pushed closer to users. The windows centric world is falling apart. The result is a dynamic ecosystem of products across the board, freed from the MS mindset that held it back for decades.[/i]

        In other words...
        [b]THIS IS THE YEAR THAT MS DIES!!!11!1one1!!!

        SERIOUSLY!!!

        THIS IS THE YEAR!!!

        I KNOW I'VE BEEN SAYING THIS EVERY YEAR FOR THE LAST 10 YEARS BUT THIS YEAR IT IS THE TRUTH!!11!1one11!![/b]

        You Apple zealots are so funny. :)
        NonZealot
      • RE: Apple's enterprise mojo by the numbers

        @Richard Flude

        You have some thing for MCSE's, I'll agree the min 90's there were way too many paper MCSE's popping up. I don't even bother listing all my technical "credentials" anymore. Did you know Apple has their own certification too?! I would think anyone not worth their weight the past 5 years was been put in line with others without a job. Talent is always needed regardless if it's Microsoft, SUN, Apple, Oracle etc.

        What I have an issue with is you equate IT goverance / compliance with some half ass support. Most large corporations have a host of regulatory as well internal controls that are required. I'm sure every CIO would love to just chuck all that out the window as it's not cheap to adhere to. That has been my point. Technically we can make iPhone / iPad meet our needs, it's just more expensive to support then say Blackberry via their platform (BES). Now some places might have less or no security but I'd hate to be the company with a stolen mobile device with NPI data. So yeah the CONTROLS we enforce are protection from those fines / lawsuits.

        Microsoft's backend is not going anywhere. For most large companies Active Directory, SQL, Exchange etc are the pillars of their business.
        MobileAdmin
      • RE: Apple's enterprise mojo by the numbers

        @Richard Flude<br><br>Seriously you no idea what you are talking about. Niether does this blogger.<br><br>Sure iPhones are allowed at my company, along with Windows Mobile/Windows Phone 7 devices. <br><br>First you must sign a legal form saying that you are ok with the policies we push down to the device, as in forced passwords, screan time outs etc. The form gives us the right to wipe the phone if you quit, get canned or lose it. Some sign the form, some dont. Those that dont dont get any access to corporate resources via the devices.<br><br>Company provided phones are now only Windows Phone 7 devices, which are very popular right now amongst those that have them.<br><br>iPad's, we tried them, they are gone now. We will be deploying some kind of Windows tablet later this year, and we will settle on one with a oak trail chipset. The main reason is full Sharepoint 2010 support. We have retail locations today that use paper reports, large ones, printed out weekly. All of that info is now on Sharepoint 2010. The cost of paper/printing supplies will pay for the devices.<br><br>We have a few Xserver servers, supporting our 25 or so Mac's in our advertising/marketing departments. Everything is currently being moved off of them and onto Windows 2008 R2 servers because of what Apple did by getting rid of them.<br><br>Our IT department is not banking on anything Apple that is NOT iOS driven.<br><br>Corporate IT assests should be treated like tools. Tools employees use to get the job THEY WERE HIRED to do....done. And not like some toy the user owns. They should be locked down and tightly controlled. In this area Apple has nothing really to offer.
        JeveSobs
      • RE: Apple's enterprise mojo by the numbers

        NonZealot: "THIS IS THE YEAR THAT MS DIES!!!11!1one1!!!"<br><br>NonZealot continue to hear what he wants too, not what's written.<br><br>MobileAdmin: "You have some thing for MCSE's"<br><br>I've spent a working lifetime in enterprise IT watching these people and MS stuff up, pushing complicated but cheap solutions that rarely work. It near universal.<br><br>"What I have an issue with is you equate IT goverance / compliance with some half ass support."<br><br>Because it is, and has been for years. The MCSE pushes their security/programming/compliance model without understanding the detail. It's embarrassing. I've been in plenty of meetings where after I've listened to the latest MCSE plan to secure the system I describe a simple way around it.<br><br>I've even listened to the head of MS security telling me we should glue up our USB ports, the MCSEs nooding, *nix guys rolling around on the floor laughing

        "Technically we can make iPhone / iPad meet our needs, it's just more expensive to support then say Blackberry via their platform (BES)."<br><br>My point, Blackberry is the past. Few want it anymore. BES was never very good, but it was force on IT to manage a poorly design mobile platform.<br><br>"Microsoft's backend is not going anywhere. For most large companies Active Directory, SQL, Exchange etc are the pillars of their business."<br><br>Change is slow, but the pillars of business are directories, RDMS, workgroup software, ERP, HR, CRM - not the MS implementations. Take a look outside your windows at the clouds (public or private). I've been implementing these style of platform for over 10 years, and they aren't windows.<br><br>JeveSobs: "Seriously you no idea what you are talking about. "<br><br>Then you go one to define exactly what I've been talking about. Sharepoint, like most MS software, requires their browser because MS can't program. I can't even manage MS partner programs without reverting to IE (I'm very familiar with MS stuff). The MCSE choose to lock themselves into this situation because their ignorance and understanding makes it difficult to implement alternatives.
        Richard Flude
    • RE: Apple's enterprise mojo by the numbers

      @MobileAdmin
      Sure shill boy, we believe you. Tell Ballmer hello for us.
      gtdworak
      • gtdworak, why is it everyone that disagrees in reference to

        Apple suddenly becomes an "MS Shill"? He could be a backer of Linux, right?
        Prove to us you're not an Apple Shill, that you don't get paid by Apple to post here.

        If you can't, you're just another troll not worth believing, but my guess is that you're an Apple Shill. ;)
        John Zern
    • iTunes isn't &quot;in the mix&quot; for enterprise..

      @MobileAdmin through the enterprise program you can install, manage, remote wipe, remote install and manage outside of iTunes..

      thanks for letting us all know you are a liar and don't know the 1st thing about what you're talking about.. lol..
      doctorSpoc
      • Yeah, I thought that too.

        @doctorSpoc Funny how a "mobility professional" and long-time Apple user doesn't know how to search the Apple support site. My company is totally windows-centric (our product uses 3-5 Microsoft Server products to run), and yet we've already built client viewer Apps for iOS.
        matthew_maurice
      • RE: Apple's enterprise mojo by the numbers

        @doctorSpoc <br><br>Well aware of the tools / document Apple provides and they do not scale for enterprise deployment and support. iTunes is still required for activatiobn. an iTunes account is REQUIRED to use AppStore and needs a credit card. What enterprise is using credit cards for software procurement?!?<br><br>We have Good Technology in place for iOS / Android support and it provides a true enterprise platform for these other devices.<br><br>Anytime you'd like to talk shop lets compare notes.
        MobileAdmin
      • RE: Apple's enterprise mojo by the numbers

        @doctorSpoc

        The tools are built into Exchange Server and any device that fully supports Active Sync can be manage by them. Android devices that are 2.2 or higher finally have most of that Active Sync supported. I have forced mobile policies on iPhones, wiped them as well when users lost them.

        iTune is required to activate, no way around it. Of course its a pain because we have special access rules for a few users in IT to allow iTunes access to the internet. Normal users cant install iTunes and if they could it would fail trying to go outside of the company.

        Going the Apple store, or shipping to is required as well, and its a total PITA. I see our desktop guys taking broken Macs and some of the very few iPhone 3G coporate devices to the local mall at lunch to get them replaced via Apple Care. They hate is the hassle. Dell comes to our sites and does the swap out.
        JeveSobs
    • Your laundry list is about corproate control of the device ...

      @MobileAdmin ... but the trend is to let the employee use the device they prefer to use.
      M Wagner
      • RE: Apple's enterprise mojo by the numbers

        @mwagner@...

        And you think because you buy the device you have full control of it? Sorry once it connects to the corporate network there are controls places to protect said data. Don't like it? Don't use your personal tech at work.
        MobileAdmin
      • RE: Apple's enterprise mojo by the numbers

        @mwagner@...
        In my experience at least, you're right. I work for one of the largest software companies in the world and I use my own laptop inside the company network without a problem.
        Eleutherios
      • RE: Apple's enterprise mojo by the numbers

        @mwagner@...

        Really not where I work. iPhone or Windows Phone, and only after you sign away the rights to your phone, other wise webmail works great in iPhone browser:)

        This is common practice on any corporation with brains. Lots of legal requirements also prevent what you speak of, depening upon the industry you are in. (PCI, SOX, etc.)
        JeveSobs