Apple's quiet iPhone enterprise efforts yield results

Apple's quiet iPhone enterprise efforts yield results

Summary: Standard Chartered, a big bank in the U.K., is reportedly replacing BlackBerries with Apple's iPhone. Apple is taking a guerrilla marketing approach to the enterprise.

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Standard Chartered, a big bank in the U.K., is reportedly replacing BlackBerries with Apple's iPhone.

According to Reuters, the bank is currently in the process of giving its BlackBerry users an option to switch to the iPhone. The bank will still pick up the tab. Reuters didn't have a lot of details about the swap.

Overall, these swaps are rare enough for Research in Motion, king of the enterprise with its BlackBerry, to barely notice. However, Apple does conduct guerilla operations in the enterprise.

For instance, I know of an Apple enterprise sales guy not far from where I live. He targets law firms and apparently wins a decent bit of converts. I was a bit surprised since enterprise sales and Apple are two themes that rarely go together.

Apple has a site focused on business and the iPhone and has a few case studies, but doesn't generally make a lot of fuss about the enterprise.

Indeed, this Apple enterprise sales guy is responsible for basically everything east of the Mississippi. In other words, Apple isn't forming an enterprise sales army or anything.

But you have to wonder what would happen if Apple really did form an enterprise army. My hunch is that it could do a lot of damage---especially in companies where employees are toting iPhones anyway. If Apple really wanted to make a run it probably could land a few more Standard Chartered swaps. There appears to be a lot of low hanging financial fruit Apple could pluck.

Related: Bits from Apple's iPhone deployment guide for the enterprise

Topics: Enterprise Software, Apple, Hardware, iPhone, Mobility, Smartphones

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27 comments
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  • RE: Apple's quiet iPhone enterprise efforts yield results

    The Blackberry is bear skins and stone knives compared to the iPhone. People who switch will be noticely more productive. Having had to support the BB for several companies, IT will find it much easier to setup and support as well.
    gtdworak
    • RE: Apple's quiet iPhone enterprise efforts yield results

      @gtdworak While I do like my Blackberry Curve I like my iPhone a whole lot better... RIM needs to do some major changes to it's OS if it wants to compete in the consumer market... and they might want to take note of Apple's efforts in the enterprise market as well...
      athynz
    • RE: Apple's quiet iPhone enterprise efforts yield results

      @gtdworak <br>except for the fact that the iPhone has no real secure encryption. It isnt used by any security organization because you cant secure data on it. And the fact that most apps that you use on the BB are free, on iphone they cost $.
      tiderulz
  • RE: Apple's quiet iPhone enterprise efforts yield results

    We have RIMS. I don't have one, but that's what the company uses.

    Internally I have an IM box that is there for only one thing, email, via outlook.

    I forward all my mail to a gmail account so I can access it on the box I work on. Linux.

    I just bought a Nexus One, voila, there's all my mail.

    An aside: Android sales have surpassed iPhone.
    Tsingi
    • RE: Apple's quiet iPhone enterprise efforts yield results

      @Tsingi Your aside is based on a ZDNet or other article that used an online survey to generate a preference for Android over the iPhone. Let's see some cold hard sales figures and if are able to come up with those and link to them - and they are from a reliable source - then I will admit to being wrong and apologize.
      athynz
      • RE: Apple's quiet iPhone enterprise efforts yield results

        @athynz (FYI)

        http://www.osnews.com/story/23272/Android_Outsells_iPhone_in_the_US

        From NPD, which is one of the most widely-used sources of retail stats.
        Tsingi
      • This years phone -v- last year's?

        You need to look at the product cycles. The iPhone is nearing a refresh (and a major OS update) while the competition is bringing out new phones during the year.

        The iPhone sales have also been reduced somewhat because of the iPod touch and the release of the iPad.
        Ken_z
      • re: You need to look at the product cycles.

        @Ken_z<br><br>No I don't. The point is that Android is doing very well. Why is that? Both Android and OSX (mobile) are UNIX based operating systems (largely benefitting from the work of GNU and Richard Stallman, I should point out)<br>
        Android is open, iPhones are not.<br>I'd like to think that that has a lot to do with it's success. <br><br>To think that people want control over their devices, and will speak to that with their wallets.
        Tsingi
      • RE:RE: Apple's quiet iPhone enterprise efforts yield results

        @athynz...Let's see some cold hard sales figures and if are able to come up with those and link to them - and they are from a reliable source - then I will admit to being wrong and apologize...

        Or, you could produce data to support your belief.
        richdave
      • RE: Apple's quiet iPhone enterprise efforts yield results

        @Tsingi
        NPD is just based on some sample survey, bot based on cold hard sales numbers, if you do have one please pass. That is what athnz is looking for.
        --Ram--
        Ram U
      • RE: Apple's quiet iPhone enterprise efforts yield results

        @athynz In any case the NPD numbers are only for the US market and only for one quarter and are skewed because iPhone only sells on one carrier, ATT, which is having trouble servicing the iPhone's demand. iPhone outsells Androids globally by far.
        junkieforsale
    • RE: Apple's quiet iPhone enterprise efforts yield results

      @Tsingi
      "Android" is an OS like "Windows". As such it is being sold to a slew of Hardware vendors. So it would make sense that Android as an OS would outsell the iPhone. You have one vendor vs how many? You have a few models with a set price vs how many models with a wide variety of quality and price. Again it only makes sense that as such Android would outsell the iPhone but I think the better analogy would be that Android is outselling the iPHone OS.. Apple and Oranges you know.

      Pagan jim
      James Quinn
      • RE: Apple's quiet iPhone enterprise efforts yield results

        @James Quinn

        As you wish.
        Tsingi
    • Surprise, surprise!

      @Tsingi
      A) Strangely enough, I know a bank that uses Outlook for email, scheduling, etc., where meeting notifications and other functions vanish or fail to arrive in a timely manner while mail itself is too easily saturated, forcing a purge of saved messages on a nearly daily basis.

      2) I wonder how satisfied you are with your Nexus One considering Google's online store is now closed.

      3) No surprise since there are 20 times as many Android devices on 5 times as many services, usually at a much lower price. What if the iPhone were available on all those services
      Vulpinemac
      • RE: Apple's quiet iPhone enterprise efforts yield results

        @vulpine@...
        2) V, I'm very happy that I got an unlocked phone online, in the nick of time. Actually the store doesn't seem to be closed yet, or it didn't seem so this morning. You'll now be able to get them the regular way. Perhaps a failed retail model for Google, but I had hopes it would succeed.

        3) But it is not. Choice, Apple does not offer it.
        Tsingi
    • Android sales are 65 thousand per day agaist iPhone's 100 thousand per day

      @Tsingi: the subject; Apple still sells way more.
      DDERSSS
      • This makes 8.75m of iPhones per quarter against 5.75m Androids worldwide

        the subject
        DDERSSS
    • RE: Apple's quiet iPhone enterprise efforts yield results

      @Tsingi I'm sure your boss loves the idea that your email is routed outside your company's network, especially to a device that lacks hardware encryption. Clearly no one emails you on sensitive subjects, or maybe you just have no grasp of security.
      matthew_maurice
  • RE: Apple's quiet iPhone enterprise efforts yield results

    @gtdworak Sorry, I can't agree. I've was an advocate for deploying iPhones in our enterprise, and I now regret it. Yes, the device is easier to set up and use but the administration is a nightmare. Granularity of control is non-existent. Control and installation of non-self written aps is extremely difficult at best. (and self written aps still have to be vetted by the App Store). The only way to install apps from the App Store is to either set up a dummy account with no billing info and allow users access to it- which means only free apps can be installed, or to set up individual accounts and lose complete control as to what is installed on the devices. You might think that controlling apps isn't important, but then you probably haven't had your company threatened with a lawsuit because of someone's "Bikini Babe" app on a company device. And in that same vein, the inability to have browsing go through your corporate filter is another liability issue that the iPhone exposes you do and you can't resolve.
    Support IS more simple as far as the device is concerned- as long as the user doesn't mind the "Wipe and Reload" method of support.
    The iPhone just isn't ready for the enterprise- and it's going to take Apple actually giving up some control of their device before it happens. Which, based on recent developments, I don't see happening any time soon.
    davesully
    • RE: Apple's quiet iPhone enterprise efforts yield results

      @davesully
      Square peg vs round hole. I've found over the years that people have told me stories of trying to take say a Macintosh and put it to work in their established enterprise situation and the horror stories they tell. What I find is a similar theme through out there stories is they try to fit the Macintosh into their environment like it was just any other PC running Windows and are frustrated to find out the bloody obvious it is NOT such hence the whole Macintosh name thing:P

      If you are going to add Apple products to your enterprise don't try to bang that square peg into that round hole. Take note of the differences and take the time to be flexible your old ways of doing things won't always work but if you keep yourself from being stuck in the past you'll find it's not nearly as hard as you think:)

      Pagan jim
      James Quinn