Cloud computing dominates data center agenda, says survey

Cloud computing dominates data center agenda, says survey

Summary: Cloud computing adoption among data center managers has snowballed in the last year with more than 70 percent of respondents who have implemented the technology or seriously considering it, according to a survey by AFCOM.

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Cloud computing adoption among data center managers has snowballed in the last year with more than 70 percent of respondents who have implemented the technology or seriously considering it, according to a survey by AFCOM, a data center association.

AFCOM surveyed 358 data center managers and found a cloud computing sea change. In 2010, 14.9 percent of data center managers implemented cloud computing in their facilities. For AFCOM's 2011 survey, 36.6 percent of respondents implemented cloud computing and another 35.1 percent were seriously considering it.

The takeaway: 80 percent to 90 percent of data centers will have some form of cloud computing in the next five years, said AFCOM.

Meanwhile, 86.8 percent of respondents said there was an increase in Web applications compared to 3 years ago.

Among the key findings:

More than 15 percent of data center managers said there was no plan for data backup and recovery and 50 percent have no plan to replace damaged equipment in a disaster.

Data centers are expanding in size with 44.2 percent of respondents saying their facilities have more floor space than three years ago. Another 49.4 percent are expanding or plan to.

59.7 percent of respondents have security policies written for online and mobile apps and 43.1 percent have social networking policies.

3.9 percent of respondents have implemented solar power at their data centers.

Topics: Hardware, Cloud, Data Centers, Servers, Storage, Virtualization

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3 comments
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  • Interesting Finding on Disaster Recovery

    I find it very interesting that, "More than 15 percent of data center managers said there was no plan for data backup and recovery and 50 percent have no plan to replace damaged equipment in a disaster."

    When disaster recovery is a lot of ways cheaper and easier with cloud computing services, I find it strange that those numbers are so high.

    A pretty good video on the impact of cloud computing and virtualization on disaster recovery can be found here: http://resource.onlinetech.com/private-cloud-computing-how-it-changes-disaster-recovery/
    Online Tech
  • RE: Cloud computing dominates data center agenda, says survey

    Some data centre users I?ve come across are using cloud based services to provide a cheaper way of providing disaster recovery cover.

    http://grahamsblog4444.blogspot.com/
    grahamc2
  • RE: Cloud computing dominates data center agenda, says survey

    It is hard to believe in 2011 that 15% of data centers have no plans for backing up their data, and thus no chance of recovery after a major operational issue or worse, a data center disaster. With software upgrades and power issues being the main cause of data center disruptions, this lack of basic protection is too risky. Perhaps the data is actually irrelevant to the organizations success, but this seems most unlikely. It?s hard to believe an IT professional could exclude backup from the operation unless under extreme budgetary pressures and even then, one might think the issue would have been escalated to senior management. The risk is too great!

    With sufficiently generous Recovery Time Objectives (RTOs) and Recovery Point Objectives (RPOs), ad hoc contacting the vendor may be a suitable strategy for the SMB experiencing a localized disaster, but it is not going to work for a regional disaster. In any event, one might expect recovery in a matter of days if not weeks under these circumstances. Can the business survive, keep its clients, reputation, credit and its shareholders while experiencing this magnitude of downtime. The larger organization certainly cannot. With tighter RPO and RTO requirements, the larger organization would typically expect to repurpose dev/test configurations located at an alternate site, albeit operating at less than 100% efficiency, until able to build out to original capabilities. Alternatively, contracting for resources at a third party in event of a disaster is an acceptable solution, but one that of course requires that the data is also be protected off-site.

    I?m still shocked and curious to hear more about the rationale behind these surprising statistics. Given that the survey covered small and large organizations worldwide, it is possible some small to medium businesses may not see their data and its protection as important to their business or even vaguely related, but that is really hard to imagine.

    The major outcome of this survey should be to motivate every business manager at every level to ensure that his IT support is itself supported by appropriate backup and disaster protection capabilities. Don?t be afraid to ask the question. ?How do you protect my data, and if my data is damaged, how long will it take you to get it back?? And get it in writing!
    Dick benton, Principal Consultant, GlassHouse technologies
    dbenton@...