Dell rolls out new Latitude laptop lineup; Targets longer battery life

Dell rolls out new Latitude laptop lineup; Targets longer battery life

Summary: Dell on Tuesday rolled out its revamped lineup of nine new Latitude and Precision laptops and trumpeted longer batter life and designs that appeal to the so-called digital nomad--the person roaming the airport for a coveted outlet to plug in his laptop.The company said the new lineup was designed with the help of 4,000 users and IT pros via its Ideastorm site.

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Dell on Tuesday rolled out its revamped lineup of nine new Latitude and Precision laptops and trumpeted longer batter life and designs that appeal to the so-called digital nomad--the person roaming the airport for a coveted outlet to plug in his laptop.

The company said the new lineup was designed with the help of 4,000 users and IT pros via its Ideastorm site. Jeff Clarke, senior vice president, Dell Product Group, said at an event in San Francisco that users wanted long battery life, better security, good design and simple to manage.

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Clarke said that Dell cooked up 3,200 prototype test units and more than 1,000 user tests. Dell also focused on ease of management by making all power supplies standard, consistent peripheral ports and one-button de-docking.

Among the more interesting features--beyond the fact that a business user can now get a pink laptop:

  • Battery life of 19 hours with a semi-rugged laptop dubbed the Latitude E6400, which starts at $2,399.
  • Software called Dell Latitude ON, which allows access to email, calendar, attachments and contacts without booting the operating system;
  • An intelligent backlit keyboard that adjusts to ambient light levels;
  • ControlVault, a sub-processor and storage system that protects user credentials in an area away from the main hard drive.
  • And you can charge your PDA and phone whether the PC is on or not. The AC power adapter is now half the size of the previous one.

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As for the lineup here's the breakdown:

  • Dell Latitude E4200 is a 12.1-inch laptop that starts at 2.2 pounds. A 13.3-inch version, E4300, will is 3.3 pounds.
  • The Latitude 14.1-inch E6400 and 15.4-inch E6500, will run you $1,139 and $1,169, respectively. Battery life will run you anywhere between 10 hours to 19 hours.
  • The Latitude E5400 is a 14.1-inch notebook that starts at $839. The 15.4-inch version will run you $869.
  • The E6400 ATG starts at $2,399 and meets 810F military standards.
  • On the mobile workstation front, the Dell Precision M4400 starts at $1,569 for the 15.4-inch version. The Precision M2400 is a 14.1-inch system that starts at $1,449. Both are heavy with the lightest Precision at 4.77 pounds.

Topics: Laptops, Dell, Hardware, Mobility

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4 comments
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  • Dell Latitude ON

    Pretty cool. Competes with Splashtop. It is Linux based.

    http://mashable.com/2008/08/12/dell-latitude-on/
    [B]If you run your Dell Latitude in the Latitude On mode, Dell purports that you?ll be able to extend your battery life for days, since you?re conserving a great deal of battery power by bypassing a full system boot up.[/B]

    It bodes well for complete Linux compatibility of the new laptops. Now, is it really that much more time before laptops simply come with "instant on" as a full blown solution replacing the OS, except for the times when you simply have to play a game or run Photoshop?

    A serious question, how long until MS supplies an "instant on" version of Windows?

    TripleII
    TripleII-21189418044173169409978279405827
    • Windows Instant ON?

      I suspect that if this instant ON technology idea takes off in the market you will have machines with out an operating system. If you have a machine that does e-mail, Word, Excel, PowerPoint,web browsing, plus a few things like audio/video you won't need a full version of any type of operating system. Basically you would have a machine with a screen the size of a laptop with the capabilities of a smart phone.

      I am a big fan of distributive computing and I have wondered for year why operating system are so large. My idea would be to design a user interface for a collection of programs designed around specific system bus architectures. Load the version that matches your hardware and you are ready to go. Change the hardware and load a patch to the o.s. to handle the new hardware.
      mr1972
  • 4 Hour Batter life barrier broken in 1994 - Ha-Ha !

    4 hour battery life barrier broken in 1994, ha-ha - don't make me laugh.

    You would be lucky to get that with the top 10% of most frugal laptops today in 2008.

    About the only portable device with decent continent to continent battery life is a Nintendo DS.
    neil.postlethwaite
  • But I thought

    Call me a fool,ok I am,but does not the screen use a large amount of energy,so how you could get days of use,makes me wonder how this could be possible?
    morrigen