False WLAN performance claims: There oughta be a law! (or a lawsuit)

False WLAN performance claims: There oughta be a law! (or a lawsuit)

Summary: Actually, there are laws; laws against false advertising.  According to our in-house WiFi guru George Ou, most of the WiFi vendors are getting away with murder and no one is holding them accountable for it.

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TOPICS: Wi-Fi
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Actually, there are laws; laws against false advertising.  According to our in-house WiFi guru George Ou, most of the WiFi vendors are getting away with murder and no one is holding them accountable for it.   Whether those vendors are making claims about their proprietary "turbo" modes or their pre-802.11n gear (the standard isn't yet ratified), the vendors' peformance claims for the supposedly faster WLAN equipment clearly outstrip what can practically be attained in real world situations.  Ou points to benchmark tests on TomsNetworking as evidence of the delta between what buyer's can realistically expect and what vendors are claiming for their gear.  Say Ou, if Apple was held accountable for misleading iPod buyers about battery life, then so should WLAN vendors who are misleading the public about throughput expectations.   I agree.  It's not about what vendors' tests turned up in some sanitized lab environment.  It's about what happens when we  open up the box and plug it in.

Topic: Wi-Fi

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  • If the government can do it, why not hardware companies????

    Our government distributes bogus information constantly. Until they are ready to lead by example, we can probably expect to see companies say whatever they think they can get away with.

    Prime example: Government tests that establish the fuel economy ratings for vehicles. I have yet to see one that is accurate (ALWAYS too high). It is generally safe to subtract 20 percent from stated fuel economies.

    In addition, the world of advertising is rife with false or misleading statements. Why anyone would pick on just the wi-fi providers is beyond me. If you are going to nail people for false advertising, we should definitely go after Taco Bell and Subway. Their food should look like it does in their commercials, but of course, it's not even close. Their commercials are pure deception.

    We should also nail cable companies for totally inflated internet throughput rates. I don't know anyone who has actually been able to hit those speeds in the real world. They should be required to state what the likely "real" speeds will be, and to specify what the LOWEST speed is going to be.

    The stream of deception from corporate America is endless. Get off the Wi-Fi kick George and go after some real criminals.
    shawkins
    • Holding Private Companies Accountable is the 1st step toward

      holding the Gov't accountable.
      Jake M.D.
  • No lab results come within 1/3 of 108 mbps

    David,

    There are no results for any turbo-G gear that even comes within 1/3 of the advertised 108 mbps figure in any lab under any circumstances. If they could actually get some short burst rate of around 100 mbps for a very short period of time, I wouldn?t have such a problem with them advertising 108 mbps burst rate. The problem is, the best case burst rate they can touch under the absolute best conditions is less than 33 mbps on ?super? or ?turbo? G equipment. It?s not even of case of embellishment, it?s a case of flat out fraud.
    george_ou