FBI/FCC collaborating to create software 'police state?'

FBI/FCC collaborating to create software 'police state?'

Summary: By way of a posting on Bruce Schneier's security blog (one of my favorites) which came by way of News.com (I know a circuitous route): The Federal Communications Commission thinks you have the right to use software on your computer only if the FBI approves....

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TOPICS: Government US
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By way of a posting on Bruce Schneier's security blog (one of my favorites) which came by way of News.com (I know a circuitous route):

The Federal Communications Commission thinks you have the right to use software on your computer only if the FBI approves.... According to the three-page document, to preserve the openness that characterizes today's Internet, "consumers are entitled to run applications and use services of their choice, subject to the needs of law enforcement."

What do we call this new sort of industry monopoly? FBIsoft?  Next thing ya know, they'll pass some law that can land us in jail if we play the songs we purchase on iTunes Music Store using a device that Apple doesn't approve of.  Ooops.  That law has already been passed too?! (DMCA anyone?).  [Update: OK, what if the Recording Industry Association of American bans telling friends about songs?]

Topic: Government US

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  • You Wanna See Something Really Offensive

    "French Government Lobbied to Ban Free Software"
    http://www.fsffrance.org/news/article2005-11-25.en.html

    This Bill would require black box routines built into all software that produces or copies any type of file. It controls and tracks who creates what and who opens it. The code to the blackbox must be kept sevrete hence no more free or Open SOurce software.

    Not that is suprising becuase the RIAA/MPAA is wanting to require all MM software include Patented trechnology much the same as this http://www.eff.org/deeplinks/archives/004106.php all in the name of plugging the analog hole. This goes beyond copying but also producing vidoe how you want as you would not be able to posses video editing software that allows a resolution over 350,000 pixels (350 X 100 resolution) unless it includes patented DRM in the stream.

    The FBI/CIA/NSA has allways wanted backdoors in our software. Microsoft has been reported as happily obliging.
    Edward Meyers
    • Book Burning

      It should be interesting to see the French shut down all of their computer science programs, since I rather doubt that 2nd-year students writing their first [b]grep[/b] will have access to said magic binaries.

      Then there's all the graduate-level research on image processing that won't be legal any more, either. Oh, and I forgot about the instant death of the French film industry.

      Well, I for one salute them. It's nice to see a country that's willing to suffer for matters of principle.

      Now, how they're going to extradite Drs Kernighan and Plauger is another matter ...
      Yagotta B. Kidding
    • Open source and media.

      The content companies don't trust open source anyway. Is there any Linux media player that works with DRM? Or any DVD?

      So this appears to be more about Windows than open source.

      Have you ever seen anything definite about backdoors built into Microsoft software? I would oppose that myself, but the idea seems more a hostile rumor.
      Anton Philidor
      • It's a bit more than that

        Apparently, the proposed law would make it an absolute requirement to include DRM in any software capable of copying copyrighted material.

        Think about that for a while.
        Yagotta B. Kidding
      • Yes

        Both Linspire http://www.linspire.com/lindows_products_details.php?product_id=11804 and TurboLinux have legal DRM/DVD Players. Also I think the commercial version of SUSE is suppose to have a legal DVD Player in it also.

        The French law is about Open Source... The media companies and BSA want to outlaw it,
        Edward Meyers
        • Costs $40 for the DVD software.

          Or $10 with CNR, which itself costs $20 per year. CNR gold, which includes non-security upgrades to the operating system, costs $50 a year. Linspire isn't cheap.

          At least, unlike Xine on which it's based, it does include a license for playback encoding, and "commercial-quality" codecs.


          On the attempt to ban open source, doesn't bode well for it in the DRM future, does it? Even players like this one could be in trouble if black box software is required.
          The content companies appear to be actively hostile to open source.
          Anton Philidor
          • OEM Prices Differ

            The OEM Prices for Linspire are;

            $20 Lindows 5.0 (No CNR)
            $35 Lindows 5.0 (1 yr CNR)
            $40 Lindows 5.0 (1 yr CNR and DVD Player)

            Or they offer an all you care to install flat rate to OEMs .

            Turbolinux bundles Cyberlink's PowerDVD with it http://www.turbolinux.com/company/news/2004/040722.html although Cyberlink does not sell the Linux version as a standalone.

            The media companies have been very hostile to the FOSS comunity. For grins you should read the testimony from last year on the Lack of a Linux DVD player (At the time Linux DVD Players only existed in hardware, and only 1 manufacture made them).

            The content companies however aren't just hostile towards the FOSS comunity. They want mandatory DRM on everything. They also want to control the distribution cahnels and even dictate who can create content.

            Right now there is Free Software (Both Freeware and Free Software) for both Linux and Windows to make high quality video content. There is even a a Linux Distro filled with Free Video tools called dyne-bolic http://www.dynebolic.org/ Basically they include Lives, Kino, Free-J, K-Toon, and Jashaka along with some other video/audio editing tools to make a live CD Video/audio studio. In the Windows world XP comes with basic video editing capabilities via Windows Movie Maker and Animation/Video Editors are available for under $100 EG; Adobe's Premiere Elements, Lucky Monkey Design's Kool Moves, Lost Marble's Moho, Mediachance's PureMotion Studio, Roxio(MGI) Video Wave, etc. VirtualDub, ABC VideoSuite, and MPEG Scissiors are all freeware on Windows (Jashaka is cross platform so it could also go here). They are afraid we will entertain ourselves, as there is already evidence of this happening as TV watching Time is being replaced with Net time by youths. So they want to put a stop to it.

            What the MPAA is pushing in congress right now would limit non-patented DRM scheme video content to 350,000 pixels and would ban any non-profesional (determained if it is popular) tool that can process analog feeds into digital . The Creative Content guys obviously are against this, as are the libraries, and Consumer/Free-Speech NGO's... Needless to say the FOSS comunity is against it also.

            If the French bill passes it will be challanged in court. It may or may not get overturned. They are trying to push the same junk in the UK. If such passes in the US then it could be challenged on a constitional basis.

            Regardless it is very very clear the content companies are hostile.
            Edward Meyers
      • Re: Open source and media.

        [i]The content companies don't trust open source anyway. Is there any Linux media player that works with DRM? Or any DVD?[/i]

        It's not open source they don't trust, it's users. Not just FOSS users, either. They don't trust any user, which is why they favor the closed, proprietary software model that denies the user the ability to tinker under the hood, and obviates the need to trust her.

        libdecss is freely available to anyone who wishes to use an unauthorized DVD player on any OS, so yes, you can watch a DVD on a FOSS computer. I don't know about other DRM, I don't use any.



        :)
        none none
      • Message has been deleted.

        none none
    • Microsoft supports fascists, why are we surprised?

      What's left to say? Except society is what we make of it. Or is it "Life is what we make of it"?

      Oh well! :)
      HypnoToad
  • What are the options?

    Between your articles on the attack on ODF, the DRM assault on consumers, and now a virtual electronic police-state David, I'm wondering what our options are.

    Writing/calling Congresspeople is futile (in my experience) and the "threat of terror" climate is enabling the police-state in an unprecedented way. All the authorities have to do now is claim that these measures are "necesary to prevent terror" and half of the population blindly accept them.

    The ease of communication and the vast amounts of accessible information made possible by the net has always been a threat to those in power.

    So what are your suggestions? I really would like some effective ideas here David. The Fourth Amendment is all but dead.
    Tim Patterson
  • It's even worse!

    This is one example. What others don't we hear about?

    http://www.halturnershow.com/KeystrokeLoggersInAllNewComputers.html
    Tim Patterson
    • Re: It's even worse!

      [i]This is one example. What others don't we hear about?[/i]

      Hopefully no more from the idiot whose page is referenced. White-only web hosting? WTF??



      :)
      none none
      • I missed that

        I missed that the first time.

        Now it appears that this racist scum probably should be under surveillance.
        Tim Patterson
    • Re: It's even worse!

      [i]This is one example. What others don't we hear about?[/i]

      Hopefully no more from the idiot whose page is referenced. White-only web hosting? WTF??



      :)
      none none