Frankston: Put the regulatorium out of our misery

Frankston: Put the regulatorium out of our misery

Summary: Bob Frankston, a thought leader that I really respect, a guy who can think in network packets, and a person who has no particular allegiance to anything but his own passions writes:“Network Neutrality” is essentially about preserving the Internet architecture. If a carrier claims to be providing Internet connectivity it should mean that they are treating all packets the same.

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TOPICS: Networking
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Bob Frankston, a thought leader that I really respect, a guy who can think in network packets, and a person who has no particular allegiance to anything but his own passions writes:

“Network Neutrality” is essentially about preserving the Internet architecture. If a carrier claims to be providing Internet connectivity it should mean that they are treating all packets the same. But Network Neutrality itself is not enough – the real problem is that the current “telecommunications industry” is must sell services to survive and that puts it [in] competition with its customers and assures scarcity. The entire Regulatorium must be decommissioned so that our economy can thrive and we create our own solutions.

With the implication that the government is suppressing competition, it sort of flies in the face of what  Netcompetition.org Scott Cleland said on NPR yesterday.  Doesn't it?

Topic: Networking

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2 comments
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  • Interesting but How

    ...can we kill the regulatorium? Perhaps we can transform the regulatorium into a symposium (I'll bring the wine). Then we can visit the vomitorium. Seriously though while I applaud the sentiment I question the implementation.
    wmlundine
  • Industry regulation

    I think it is up to the public and their representatives in the
    federal, state, and local governments to decide what regulations
    should apply to the ?telecommunications industry?, as it is for
    any other industry.

    > the real problem is that the current ?telecommunications industry?
    > is(sic?) must sell services to survive and that puts it [in]
    > competition with its customers and assures scarcity.

    Is this a problem with the companies' business model, or with the
    regulations applied to the industry, or both?

    There are other "distribution systems" that are fairly analogous to
    the internet's distribution system. The highway system, the railroads,
    the electrical, gas, water, and sewage systems are examples. How are
    they regulated? Do similar problems occure there?

    For instance, can whoever owns the high tension electrical lines to
    a city charge different rates to differt people who want to send
    electricy to the city? Or to people in the city who want to buy it?
    Can they limit the ammount of electricity the lines carry, to
    change the value of electricity in the city?

    I hear there is a private toll road in the Virginia suburbs of
    Washington DC. Could the owners charge different tolls for people
    driving Fords than Hondas? Could they charge different rates for
    one taxi company vs. another?

    I don't know the current regulations governing these industries, but
    they would seem to be usefull places to look for precidents for how
    to regulate network connectivity.

    Re the FCC, wasn't it originally created to regulate, in the public
    interest, the limited frequency spectrum for broadcast, public service,
    and other uses? As in evolution, so in the legal system, entities that
    were doing one thing are often adapted to more/other things. Maybe it
    is time to again give the FCC control over only the things which are
    by their nature limited: the airwaves, communications sattelite
    positions and frequencies, etc.

    cronebeast
    CroneBeast