Google takes aim at critics of net neutrality proposal

Google takes aim at critics of net neutrality proposal

Summary: Google fired back at critics of its net neutrality policy proposal with Verizon. In a nutshell, Google said it wasn't a sell out, hasn't shelved wireless net neutrality plans and denied it's working with Verizon because of its Android ties.

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Google on Thursday fired back at critics of its net neutrality policy proposal with Verizon. In a nutshell, Google said it wasn't a sell out, hasn't shelved wireless net neutrality plans and denied it's working with Verizon because of its Android ties.

Google is trying to tone down the hubbub over its proposal with Verizon. As noted yesterday, the emotions around the policy proposal by Google and Verizon are running high.

In a blog post, Google's Washington counsel Richard Whitt tried to debunk "a number of inaccuracies" to move the debate along. Among the key highlights:

  • Google said it is not a sellout on network neutrality. Google said it has been working on the issue for five years, but partnering with carriers makes the most sense. "We’re not saying this solution is perfect, but we believe that a proposal that locks in key enforceable protections for consumers is preferable to no protection at all," said Whitt.
  • Whitt also countered that its policy proposal with Verizon is a step back for an open Internet. Enforceable rules are better than having the FCC impose regulations on the Internet.
  • Google acknowledged that it has advocated openness on the wireless front, but you have to compromise somewhere. Whitt wrote:

It’s also important to keep in mind that the future of wireless broadband increasingly will be found in the advanced, 4th generation (4G) networks now being constructed. Verizon will begin rolling out its 4G network this fall under openness license conditions that Google helped persuade the FCC to adopt. Clearwire is already providing 4G service in some markets, operating under a unique wholesale/openness business model. So consumers across the country are beginning to experience open Internet wireless platforms, which we hope will be enhanced and encouraged by our transparency proposal.

Meanwhile, Google chafed at the argument that the company is too tight with Verizon. Google said the companies outlined a policy proposal not a business deal. The idea is to advance the net neutrality debate that has gone nowhere for five years.

Topics: Mobility, Google, Networking, Verizon, Wi-Fi

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23 comments
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  • More lies from Google

    Google's words may say that they're not evil but Google's history and their actions proves that they are
    iPad-awan
    • RE: Google takes aim at critics of net neutrality proposal

      @iPad-awan Spoken like a true Micro$oft supporter! Kudos!
      Toque_3D
      • RE: Google takes aim at critics of net neutrality proposal

        @Toque_3D Wow must hurt to have the same view cast on your alter...that you cast on Microsoft. Interesting...
        ItsTheBottomLine
    • RE: Google takes aim at critics of net neutrality proposal

      @iPad-awan

      If these actions make them evil, Apple's actions make them the Anti-Christ.
      wraith404
  • RE: Google takes aim at critics of net neutrality proposal

    Isn't all big business essentially evil in one way or another?
    mbrogdon
    • RE: Google takes aim at critics of net neutrality proposal

      @mbrogdon

      No.
      slingzenarrowzuvowtrayjissforchin
    • One wireless company...

      @mbrogdon - Credo
      AttackComputerWhiz
    • good & evil

      @mbrogdon

      I would say that the good & evil thing isn't really applicable when describing companies. The purpose of companies is to push the edge. The purpose of government is to define the edge. So when you see what you perceive as evil, I would say it's a failing of government to set appropriate rules. And assuming we're talking about a democracy, it's a failure of the citizens to elect the right government.

      gary
      gdstark13
      • RE: Google takes aim at critics of net neutrality proposal

        @gdstark13 <br><br>Actually, it is more accurate to say that the purpose of companies is to make money (or, more accurately, collect it). And the purpose of government is to regulate the flow of money.<br><br>Same basic effect, but different motives.
        grassdogstudio
  • Always a slant and dodge.

    "Enforceable rules are better than having the FCC impose regulations on the Internet."

    Better for who? FCC and FTC regulations are the only reason I don't have to pay $500/month for a copper telephone line to my house, or be forced to pay for hundreds of cable TV channels just to receive the one I like (oops, they haven't fixed that one yet).

    Businesses hate regulations, especially when they get in the way of gouging customers.
    terry flores
    • RE: Google takes aim at critics of net neutrality proposal

      @terry flores

      Deregulation, under Reagan IIRC, is why you're not paying $500 for a copper phone line. Don't you remember the ridiculously high phone rates that the government granted monopolies (AT&T, etc.) used to charge for phones and long distance calls?

      The free market, not arbitrary government regulation, is the answer to cheap available internet access. The free market really does work when it's actually free and not regulated to death. It's been so long since we've had a really free economy in the US that people seem to have forgotten what it really is and how it really does work.
      Furiousrog
      • RE: Google takes aim at critics of net neutrality proposal

        @Furiousrog Not really a long time. Just two years since our free economy destroyed our economy! Consequences! The proof is in the pudding!
        kenan@...
      • RE: Google takes aim at critics of net neutrality proposal

        @Furiousrog Completely agree. To say that the free market destroyed our economy is much like saying "weapons destroyed our society". Those weapons fought to grant us the blessings of liberty we still (though slipping) enjoy today. The free market provided the battle grounds to make that computer your using to argue against free economy, exponentially faster and cheaper...the proof is at your fingertips. The free market did not destroy our economy...no more than weapons destroyed our society. Criminals are responsible and hiding them behind a blanket of free market only serves to keep them out of jail. Stop with the unjustified generalizations.
        defiant.behavior
      • RE: Google takes aim at critics of net neutrality proposal

        @Furiousrog
        I strongly agree with your comment.
        neil123789456
      • RE: Google takes aim at critics of net neutrality proposal

        <i>Deregulation, under Reagan IIRC, is why you're not paying $500 for a copper phone line. Don't you remember the ridiculously high phone rates that the government granted monopolies (AT&T, etc.) used to charge for phones and long distance calls?</i><br><br>Oh you mean those days where you could make all the local calls you wanted to for about $15 a month? And yes, that rare long distance call would cost you, what? About 50 cents a minute?<br><br>I guess we <i>had it so bad</i>, huh.<br><br>And then we had that period between the early 80s and the mid 90s <b>before</b> cell phone usage took off, so instead we had about seven mini monopolies (instead of one) that carved up the country and didn't have to compete among themselves.<br><br>Yeah, trickle-down 'free' enterprise allright. lol... :D<br><br><i>The free market, not arbitrary government regulation, is the answer to cheap available internet access. The free market really does work when it's actually free and not regulated to death.</i><br><br>Gee, why don't you tell that to the internet monopolies like Comcast and Cox who have local sweetheart deals and territories carved up among themselves (like the baby Bells of old) and don't allow any competition to share the copper lines. Where only one ISP provider exists and nobody regulates their constant rate increases.<br><br>Yeah, free market bull$hit, alright...<br><br><i>The free market really does work when it's actually free and not regulated to death. It's been so long since (snip...)</i><br><br> blah...blah...blah...<br><br>Go sell your tired snake oil somewhere else.
        LTV10
    • do really believe that?

      @terry flores

      Who is forcing you to buy anything? Stop rotting your mind with that cable TV and read up on economics!
      otaddy
      • RE: Google takes aim at critics of net neutrality proposal

        @otaddy
        I'm with terry flores. Economics is a good guessamation. And the guessing was dismal during the melt down, even without cable TV. Harry Potter is more accurate!
        eargasm
  • RE: Google takes aim at critics of net neutrality proposal

    I was a fan of Google and supported them during almost all of their growth by using many of their products. Recently, as they turned into an oligarchy, I came to question how much (or little) they served my interests.
    The recent alliance with Verizon has quantified just how little my interests as a consumer enters into their corporate game plan. As a result, I opened Firefox, hit the "Make this my default" button and applied upgrades. Then the same with T'bird. I didn't realize how much I was missing. I don't think Google realizes how much their success depends on our good will and how easy it is for us the change allegiances.
    fred.schwacke@...
  • RE: Google takes aim at critics of net neutrality proposal

    The free economy could not destroy our economy because there was no free economy two years ago. The melt down is because of no free economy and the rotting state we are in is because we just decide to make it even less free and open.
    <br>Let the invisible hand do its job and stop trying to guide it. If it must fail let it, clean out the crap and allow new flesh to grow but instead we try to keep the cancer there and just manage it but it is not manageable. To much regulation does not allow for growth of all. It only allows for growth of the select.
    Norgen31
  • RE: Google takes aim at critics of net neutrality proposal

    Net Neutrality is just another way for the government to steal away more of our freedoms. There should be more critics of this proposal, especially for those who depend on the internet for their livelyhood, such as yourself and many other businesses and individuals. Lets keep freedom of speach free and not subject to the few in government who want control of every aspect of our lives.
    tperkins3@...