Google, Verizon unveil proposal - not agreement - to help FCC with Net Neutrality policy

Google, Verizon unveil proposal - not agreement - to help FCC with Net Neutrality policy

Summary: Google and Verizon today revealed a seven-point proposal - not an agreement - to help the FCC craft a broadband policy that keeps the Internet open.

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Google and Verizon today unveiled a proposed compromise on how the Federal Communications Commission should frame legislature around the Internet, while preserving Net Neutrality.

In a post on Google's Public Policy blog, the companies revealed their vision of how content providers and broadband providers can work together to maintain an open Internet while also allowing technology to flourish. The proposal isn't quite the "deal" between the two companies that sent consumer advocacy groups into a tailspin when rumors of an agreement between the two first surfaced last week. From the post:

We believe this policy framework properly empowers consumers and gives the FCC a role carefully tailored for the new world of broadband, while also allowing broadband providers the flexibility to manage their networks and provide new types of online services... As policy makers continue to formulate the rules of the road, we hope that other stakeholders will join with us in providing constructive ideas for an open Internet policy that puts consumers in charge and enhances America’s leadership in the broadband world. We stand ready to work with the Congress, the FCC and all interested parties to do just that.

The proposal offered by the companies contains seven elements. They are:

  • Make the FCC's current wireline broadband openness principles fully enforceable at the FCC. Those principles ensure that consumers have access to all legal content on the Internet and can use any application, service or devices of their choosing. The Comcast court decision called the enforcement of those principles into question, the companies said.
  • New enforceable prohibition against discriminatory practices would prohibit wireline broadband providers from discriminating against or prioritizing content, applications or services that cause harm to users or competition. The principle includes a presumption against prioritization of Internet traffic - including paid prioritization.
  • Transparency rules. The proposal creates enforceable transparency rules for both wireline and wireless services which requires broadband providers to give consumers clear, understandable information about the services they offer and their capabilities and to provide app and content providers with the information they need about network management practices.
  • The FCC's role and authority. The proposal provides for a new enforcement mechanism for the FCC. Specifically, the FCC would enforce these openness policies on a case-by-case basis, using a complaint-driven process and could move swiftly to halt violators, including the authority to impose a penalty of up to $2 million.
  • Allow broadband providers to offer additional, differentiated online services, in addition to the Internet access and video services offered today. The companies note that it's too soon to predict how these new services will develop, but examples might include health care monitoring, the smart grid, advanced educational services, or new entertainment and gaming options. The proposal includes safeguards to ensure that such online services are distinguishable from traditional broadband Internet access services and are not designed to circumvent the rules.
  • Different rules for wireless - for now. The still-nascent mobile landscape is changing rapidly. Under the proposal, most of the wireline principles would not apply to wireless, except for the transparency requirement. Also, the Government Accountability Office would be required to report to Congress annually on developments in the wireless broadband marketplace.
  • Finally, the proposal supports the reform of the Federal Universal Service Fund, so that it is focused on deploying broadband in areas where it is not now available.

Topics: Government US, Browser, Government

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51 comments
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  • RE: Google, Verizon unveil proposal - not agreement - to help FCC with Net Neutrality policy

    trust the wolf to guard the hen house? Me neither.
    Al_nyc
  • RE: Google, Verizon unveil proposal - not agreement - to help FCC with Net Neutrality policy

    The fact that Google and Verizon are asking the FCC to "frame legislature" [sic] is problematic in and of itself. Legislation is a function of Congress, and should not be vested in any bureaucracy.
    JMcNulty611
    • Agreed!

      @JMcNulty611
      Although I (mostly) support Google and Verizon as providing some of the best services, what is their mindset to having legislation set???
      enriche
    • RE: Google, Verizon unveil proposal - not agreement - to help FCC with Net Neutrality policy

      @JMcNulty611 Yep, because we all know the government makes the best decisions in regards to technology legislature. Though the fact that Verizon is involved at all scares me, they're all about the bottom line & what is in their best interest.
      @...
      • RE: Google, Verizon unveil proposal - not agreement - to help FCC with Net Neutrality policy

        @shane@... sad but true. It was the government that gave us the DMCA, one of the worst pieces of legislation ever. It's obvious the authors were clueless when it came to technology.
        Al_nyc
      • As a public company, so is Googles sole interest...

        @shane@...

        The bottom line.
        Bruizer
      • RE: Google, Verizon unveil proposal - not agreement - to help FCC with Net Neutrality policy

        @shane@... Verizon promised the government a fiber optic network in exchange for tax breaks, Verizon never fulfilled this promise. Now we have an antiquated system with slow speed, Japan's network is 10 times faster.
        bobbryant
  • RE: Google, Verizon unveil proposal - not agreement - to help FCC with Net

    Those principles ensure that consumers have access to all legal content on the Internet,,,,,,,,,,

    Well, imagine that.
    trm1945
    • ..."Imagine that"

      @trm1945

      Had to laugh at that one - nice one, trm1945! :) :D Of course, the implications of that statement - what it does and doesn't say, and whether we really trust ANY government of ANY stripe to actually abide by that - are so convoluted and nebulous as to be beyond any practical, real-world meaning... ;)
      naibeeru
  • I don't trust any one of them...

    How soon until ISPs are offering "additional, differentiated online services" like "High Speed Access", "Streaming Video" and "Unlimited Connectivity"? The "traditional broadband Internet access services" will stagnate at their current speed and we will pay through the nose for anything better.<br><br>They will soon have their hands even deeper in our pockets.
    sismoc
    • RE: Google, Verizon unveil proposal - not agreement - to help FCC with Net Neutrality policy

      @sismoc

      I'm sure thay already have the outlines of exactly what they are going to do already.
      Teako
    • This is EXACTLY where they're going with this. googles EVIL tricks...

      You will now lose internet access for pointing this out :-)

      Seriously though how disgustingly transparent...
      Johnny Vegas
    • RE: Google, Verizon unveil proposal - not agreement - to help FCC with Net Neutrality policy

      You hit the nail on the head. Most of us already pay plenty for our internet access now. We will be "nickel and dimed" to death for any additional service; actually more like $5 and $10 to death. The providers are looking out for the bottom line and nothing else.
      js7247@...
    • RE: Google, Verizon unveil proposal - not agreement - to help FCC with Net Neutrality policy

      And of course, the restrictions don't even apply to wireless . . . wonder why Verizon and Google (the Android people) would want that?! Anybody here think the future is Wired instead of Wireless?
      paul@...
  • RE: Google, Verizon unveil proposal - not agreement - to help FCC with Net Neutrality policy

    This should scare anyone that reads it. Surely it can not be good for the citizens who enjoy freedom and competition.
    jsjag
  • RE: Google, Verizon unveil proposal - not agreement - to help FCC with Net Neutrality policy

    No way...Google and verizon should have NO say so in this!!
    colecrew
  • RE: Google, Verizon unveil proposal - not agreement - to help FCC with Net Neutrality policy

    I agree with Al_nyc.

    Also, when has the government managed anything and it came out good for the consumer.

    I believe it's just the government wanting to control freedom of speech and content on the Internet. I think the government should stay out the it should be complete open and not restricted.

    rcg
    ricky.gates@...
    • RE: Google, Verizon unveil proposal - not agreement - to help FCC with Net Neutrality policy

      @ricky.gates@...

      Medicaid. Social Security. The NIH. The military. Public higher education. Libraries. The FDA. The FDIC. 911 services. The CDC. NASA. The <em>Internet</em>. The Postal Service. Highways. The FAA. Elections. Police.

      Yeah, you're right. Things go well when the government stays out of it. Things like Investment Banking. Off shore oil drilling. Health insurance premiums. Green energy investment.
      x I'm tc
      • RE: Google, Verizon unveil proposal - not agreement - to help FCC with Net Neutrality policy

        @jdakula I think you messed up your categories.<br><br>Medicaid, Social Security, Public higher education, FDA, FDIC, Postal Service, FAA all belong in the second paragraph (with Investment banking, health insurance, etc).<br><br>Libraries, 911, Police, elections are the responsibility of your local elected officials.
        trent1
      • RE: Google, Verizon unveil proposal - not agreement - to help FCC with Net Neutrality policy

        @jdakula Most of the things you listed are not run well and/or cost way more than they should. Oh, and they were suppose to be regulating Investment banking and off shore drilling. Green Energy Investment, more $$$ for farmers to grow corn. twice the cost/half the efficency of Gas plus pushes up the cost of basic foods in Mexico and Beef price here.

        Yeah, we want more of that.
        tzcannon