How SAP keeps the pressure on Oracle

How SAP keeps the pressure on Oracle

Summary: The escalating rivalry between SAP and Oracle underlies much of the news coming out of the German software maker's customer conference in Copenhagen this week. The most significant item: the business software giant is teaming with Microsoft to develop and market software that will link SAP's business management systems more closely with Microsoft's Office suite.

SHARE:
TOPICS: SAP
3
The escalating rivalry between SAP and Oracle underlies much of the news coming out of the German software maker's customer conference in Copenhagen this week. The most significant item: the business software giant is teaming with Microsoft to develop and market software that will link SAP's business management systems more closely with Microsoft's Office suite. SAP detailed other extended partnerships--including alliances with IBM and Siemens--and offered a glimpse of several of the 100 business analysis programs it plans to introduce later this year. The company also took a fresh jab at Oracle with an expanded plan to lure away former customers of PeopleSoft and J.D. Edwards...

Topic: SAP

Kick off your day with ZDNet's daily email newsletter. It's the freshest tech news and opinion, served hot. Get it.

Talkback

3 comments
Log in or register to join the discussion
  • Not nearly the impact it's made out to have

    Yawn - this type of activity might seem exciting and fierce outside of the trenches, but it's all pretty mundane from the frontline view.

    SAP & IBM's announcement about stronger DB2 ties: great, if you're an SAP customer using DB2, but hardly a reason for an SAP customer to switch TO DB2, and not even close to compelling for a non-SAP customer, even if they have DB2, to migrate to SAP. The benefits would never begin to approach the costs. And we saw how beneficial PeopleSoft's partnership with IBM was in changing the course of the Oracle battle.

    And now we're all breathless about SAP tying into MS Office? Whether SAP components can use Office applications effectively or not isn't going to have that big an impact on customers' decisions to run with SAP or Oracle.

    The "Safe Passage" offer might be tempting to those companies that were already considering jumping to another ERP vendor, but I doubt it's going to make a dent in the existing customer base. It would take boat loads of money, forget discounts, to make up for the months-long interruption that an ERP migration would represent.
    ejhonda
    • FUD

      Stupid response.

      Oracle is attempting to merge their products with PeopleSoft - Fusion will be at least one more product release out, and will not be as strong/good/bug free as later iterations will be. What little report writing capability PS does/did have is directly tied to MS Office - nVision (Excel) and Word. That of course will go away with Fusion - instead you will more than likely get locked into Oracle Report Writing - or a third party like Cognos.

      Meanwhile SAP has a strong Java infrastructure, and has released a .NET SDK to create interfaces. Office 2003 has implemented the .NET framework - meaning before Oracle gets it's show on the road, SAP and MS will have a mature product in the pipeline.

      So when faced with the end of the PS line at version 9 - your choices will be Oracle with a new Fusion of Java and Peoplecode, or SAP with your choice of pure Java or .NET.
      quietLee
      • Anti-FUD

        If "remain calm" = FUD, you've found a new definition, or perhaps don't understand it.

        Your crystal ball pronouncements will have to wait for the test of time, but are hardly something that enterprises will be willing to use now as leverage to convince wholesale changes in ERP vendor.

        Corrections: most of PS's reporting functions are tied into 3rd party product Crystal Reports. Current Word hooks are officially unsupported by both PeopleSoft/Oracle and Microsoft - they were weak to start with and are provided with that no-support caveat.

        Oracle has stated that Fusion middleware will not retain PeopleCode components - they're touting it as Java-based, along with other current "open standard" technologies. Oracle has also stated (in Newton on 4/20) that the end of the PS line will not be 9, but probably several dot iterations into 9. One should take that as Oracle covering themselves in case the Fusion march takes longer than anticipated.
        ejhonda