Intel touts 'ultrabooks'; Highlights Android Honeycomb Atom-based tablet

Intel touts 'ultrabooks'; Highlights Android Honeycomb Atom-based tablet

Summary: Intel touted "ultrabooks," tablet and laptop tweeners that would resemble MacBook Airs, and said these lightweight devices will account for 40 percent of the laptop market by the end of 2012.

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Intel on Tuesday touted "ultrabooks," tablet and laptop tweeners that would resemble MacBook Airs, and said these lightweight devices will account for 40 percent of the laptop market by the end of 2012.

Speaking at the Computex show in Taipei, Sean Maloney, Intel's executive vice president, said these ultrabooks will continue to improve annually. While the ultrabook phrase will generate initial buzz, these devices are evolutionary. What's initially unclear is how an ultrabook differs from the netbook---a market under fire from tablets. Intel frequently touts next-gen reference designs. Anyone remember the mobile Internet devices (MID)?

Gallery: Asus UX

Intel's mission at Computex was clear. Prove that it has a tablet strategy---the company touted design wins and Maloney showed off 10 tablets---and give the laptop cycle more life. And of course, Intel plans to be a key chip provider for both. The chip giant has the laptop market locked up, but tablets are a different story as Qualcomm and Nvidia are out to an early lead along with the ARM architecture.

Also: Intel unveils new class of PC - 'Ultrabooks'

Maloney said these ultrabooks will cost less than $1,000, be less than 0.8 inches thick and run on second generation Core chips at first. In other words, Intel is arguing that a big chunk of the laptop market will resemble the MacBook Air.

The second phase of the ultrabook rollout will occur with "Ivy Bridge" in the first half of 2012. Intel will then improve chip performance annually.

However, Intel's ability to make its Atom chip a tablet processor may be the more important factor. Ultrabooks are nice, but it appears tablets are going to be dominant. To that end, Intel demonstrated tablets running Windows, Meego and Android.

Maloney highlighted an Intel "Medfield" design running Google's Honeycomb tablet operating system. Those designs are expected to hit production later this year and hit the market in the first half of 2012.

Topics: Intel, Hardware, Laptops, Mobility, Tablets

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8 comments
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  • RE: Intel touts 'ultrabooks'; Highlights Android Honeycomb Atom-based tablet

    Less than $1,000? Wow. Why pay so much for so little?
    The one and only, Cylon Centurion
    • It is not cheap to build thin computer that would not be rubbish

      @Cylon Centurion: so Macbook Air costs $999, not $399 or anything.

      Even though Ultrabooks as concept was invented by Apple three years ago with Macbook Air machines, Intel deserves some credit since it answered positively to Steven Jobs' wish to have CPU without box: Intel agreed to produce it for Apple. Later such processors became available for any PC manufacturer.
      DDERSSS
      • Was invented by Apple 3 years ago?

        @denisrs
        [i]Intel agreed to produce it for Apple. Later such processors became available for any PC manufacturer[/i]

        Wow, next you'll give Apple all the credit for discovering and creating the Polio vaccine.
        Will Pharaoh
      • Can not stand basic facts of history? Story of MBA was told with Intel's ..

        @Will Pharaoh: ... Otellini on the stage along with Jobs in January of 2008.

        So you have to live with it: to have boxless CPU produced it was Apple's idea (they needed for MBA or else other chips would not fit; and Jobs did not want "Pentium mobile" or whatever slow chips) and it was done for Apple. The CPU was later available for other Intel's buyers.
        DDERSSS
  • The Big Idea is to copy today's MacBook air by 2012?

    So they're aiming to follow Apple's current example of the Macbook Air by the end of 2012?
    And what will Apple be doing by the end of 2012? -- Answer: Something that's better than what is envisioned by copying today's MacBook Air.

    Understanding consumer trends should not be rocket science, nor computer/engineering science:

    Lighter, more responsive, & less annoyances.
    -- Making devices adapt to real life & humans, rather than pushing users to adapt their lives to the quirks and annoyances of computing devices, etc...

    In other words -- Duh (ie: common sense).
    voltrarian
    • RE: Intel touts 'ultrabooks'; Highlights Android Honeycomb Atom-based tablet

      @voltrarian
      And that would be?
      Notebook design is cyclic - thin to feature to battery to display to..... The MBA is the latest feature.
      What's next? I for one have no real clue ;)
      rhonin
    • I think it's just the opposite.

      @voltrarian : the MacBook Air was created by Apple using existing technology on a innovative package. If you check the specs, no Air is Core i3, i5 or i7, so really what Intel is showing off is it's take of the Air using their technology guys.

      With that said, I don't think they will get that far as this is just a rethread of the infamous CULV which were suppose to kill the netbooks using conventional chips.

      Let's face it. Intel and Microsoft killed the netbook because it was hurting their bottom line. Atom wasn't meant for that use case, and Windows XP was given the axe by the Softies.

      In the end, they killed their only hope against the slates, a category which hadn't been invented yet. Windows 7 delayed new introductions and the 7 Starter was just a joke, compared to the full XP.

      Today, both are scrambling to retake the lost ground and are eager to "invent" up-and-coming alternatives to the slate. (Microsoft with the Windows 8 "Immersive" ARM tablets and now Intel with the Ultrabooks)

      Both think they have "got it", but ironically they are both running on opposite directions when in the past running in sync had been their only true competitive advantage.
      cosuna
  • RE: Intel touts 'ultrabooks'; Highlights Android Honeycomb Atom-based tablet

    Would also be interesting to check out RDP clients for these new devices, including the 2X Client for Android (www.2x.com/virtualdesktop/android); gives you access to your core apps on the go. Let me know what you all think!
    jimmytran