Just what the world needs: More consultants

Just what the world needs: More consultants

Summary: Accenture is about to disappoint those who believe the last thing the corporate world needs is more consultants. Accenture, the giant consultant firm, says it wants to double its ranks of 13,000 "management consultant professionals.

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Accenture is about to disappoint those who believe the last thing the corporate world needs is more consultants.

Accenture, the giant consultant firm, says it wants to double its ranks of 13,000 "management consultant professionals."

Meanwhile, Accenture said it wants to add all those consultants in the next three years. Can you clone consultants?

The company said "the plan to nearly double the number of these professionals will enable the company to expand the breadth and depth of its management consulting services globally, in developed markets such as the United States, United Kingdom and Germany, as well as in rapidly evolving markets such as India, China and Brazil."

In other words, globalization is driving Accenture's consultant hiring orgy? We can't wait. Just imagine the management buzzwords these additional consultants can create. The models for business prowess will also multiply--as will the billable hours. The one downside: The return on your IT projects may not improve. After all, someone has to pay all of these new consultants.

Topic: Browser

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5 comments
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  • What's wrong with consultants ??

    It's an honorable profession, and appealing to experienced professionals who prefer leveraging their varied backgrounds to solve a broader range of problems than they might in a 9-to-5 cubicle job.

    IT departments are not locked in to hiring an individual with a specific skill set which may not merit a full-time "lifer" position and absorb the loaded costs of a full-time employee.

    As far as I know, Accenture is no worse than any other large consulting firm out there. Consultants often are required to travel extensively, and spend much time away from their families and friends. It costs money to compensate people who are willing to do that.
    JackPastor
    • perhaps

      but sometimes hiring a consultant to do the job can cost as much or more than having in-house I.T. professionals. Every company will have to weigh the pros and cons of each.
      Badgered
  • Despair on Consulting

    I love Despair's take on Consulting:
    If your not part of the solution, there's good money to be made in prolonging the problem!
    Douglas Karr
  • Despair on Consulting

    I love Despair's take on Consulting:
    If you're not part of the solution, there's good money to be made in prolonging the problem!
    Douglas Karr
  • My experience indicates...

    I have been in the computer business now for nearly 30 years. I have seen many successful projects done both 'in house' and through consultants. My observation is that the 'in house' projects produce better and more robust solutions.

    There are a number of reasons why this is so, but the most important - in my opinion - is that consultants have no continuing link to the company. Therefore they are not invested in the project's results like those who will have to work with it. They will have cashed their checks and will be long gone when the house of cards they have sold you collapses under the weight of your business needs.

    In house teams, on the other hand, know that it is they who will be cleaning up the mess if the project fails. As such, I have found that they take far greater care in both the design and implementation phases of a project.

    This is not to say that *all* in house projects will turn out better than ones done with consultants, but in my experience - all other things being equal - an in house staff produces a superior end result.

    Just my $0.02 USD based on 28 years in the business, and your opinion (especially if you *are* a consultant) may vary.

    Regards,
    Jon
    JonathonDoe