Kaspersky: Trying to keep one step ahead of the Internet's bad guys

Kaspersky: Trying to keep one step ahead of the Internet's bad guys

Summary: At the Kaspersky Virus Analyst Summit in San Francisco, security experts talk about the lengths that Internet bad guys go to to keep their businesses humming.

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TOPICS: Hardware, Browser
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There's plenty to be scared of in the dark alleys of the Internet. After all, that's where the Internet's bad guys are doing anything and everything - from posing as legitimate businesses to sifting through social networking data - to make a quick and easy buck.

Kaspersky, maker of Internet protection software, is trying to stay ahead of the game with its products but says that to truly fight off malware and other bad forces on the Internet, they also need to educate.

In a sense, that's what the company is trying to do with its Virus Analyst Summits, panel discussions being held in San Francisco and New York this week to discuss the forces at work in the Internet's underground.

In some cases, the methods being used by the bad guys aren't new, but they have grown more sophisticated. Scareware, for example, has grown from the days of a colorful pop-up ad that warns an unsuspecting user that a virus may have infiltrated a computer. The idea there, of course, is that the user will be scared that the computer has become infected and will click on the ads or links to purchase some bogus protection.

Sure, the folks posing as a legitimate computer protection software company could just grab a user's credit card and go on a shopping spree. But instead, they're trying to get customers to renew that bogus sense of protection every three months or so. To do so, they go to great lengths - from a live chat support system to a 24/7 call center - to look like a legitimate company.

On the other side of the spectrum are the identity thieves and hackers who target specific people or groups of people to gain access to computer systems or the information on them. It used to be that hackers going after a particular target would have to study that target, sifting through the Internet to learn the person's or groups behavioral habits. Today, they don't have far to go. The bad guy only needs to scour the Internet for social networking data coming out of sites like Facebook.

On Facebook, of course, we share things such as our locations, our places of employment, our travel plans, our kids names, our birthdays, our political leanings and so on. We might as well post our PIN numbers and passwords on the Internet for everyone to see.

And for those who are looking to spread malware, the methods are tailored for today's common activities. Those who embed viruses, worms or trojans into a PDF, for example, can spread the link to that corrupted file - maybe used to release botnets, spread spam and launch a denial of service attack - through Twitter.

Twitter and Google both showcase trends on Internet searches throughout the day. Knowing what the hot topics are, bad guys can blast out tweets using the popular keywords of the day, along with a dirty link. Likewise, if the bad guys are targeting a particular industry, they can employ the use of hashtags to sneak into the Twitter noise under the radar and offer up some links that some in the pack just might click on.

For the most part, the company is still focusing its efforts on what's happening on Windows PCs - the much bigger net in an ocean of fish. Mobile, as well as tablet computing platforms like the iPad, are really just in their infancy, the analysts said, and aren't yet a haven for bad guys - especially in the U.S.

That's not to say it can't be done. The company is well aware of what's happening with the use of SMS links and so on to infiltrate the mobile space in other countries. But for now, it's not much of a problem in the U.S.

When it comes to fighting off the Internet's bad guys, there is no end to the war. The bad guys can stay under the radar, change their names and, of course, operate in countries where authorities tend to have a blind eye when it comes to these sort of underground activities.

But they'll never go away completely, which is why companies like Kaspersky are trying to think ahead, trying to outwit and outguess or just generally stay one step of the bad guys.

Topics: Hardware, Browser

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  • RE: Kaspersky: Trying to keep one step ahead of the Internet's bad guys

    "and, of course, operate in countries where authorities tend to have a blind eye when it comes to these sort of underground activities."

    Maybe it's time to start blocking these countries altogether. If they can't even lift a finger against the bad guys, they don't deserve to have open internet access.
    CobraA1
    • RE: Kaspersky: Trying to keep one step ahead of the Internet's bad guys

      @CobraA1 - GREAT response! If this is a "global community" then everyone must do their part and not be greedy or lazy or malicious...
      HypnoToad72
    • RE: Kaspersky: Trying to keep one step ahead of the Internet's bad guys

      @CobraA1

      Rather than exclude large blocks of people (innocent along with the criminals) from internet usage, how about we just design a secure PC. Protect the code that's not supposed to change with hardware. Put my perfectly good, four year old copy of Office on a physical chip that I can insert (install) or remove (uninstall). Likewise the OS and most of my apps. The current design that allows any moderately smart badguy to change those bits remotely will never stablize, which is exactly what we're living through now. My experience designing complex embedded applications tells me that this will work. It's possible to test even fairly complex applications to the point of comitting them to ROM or the equivalent. Until we take this approach the PC cannot achieve the status of "appliance".

      gary
      gdstark13
      • RE: Kaspersky: Trying to keep one step ahead of the Internet's bad guys

        @gdstark13

        and when a bug is found in the code, you then have to remove and replace a ROM chip rather than apply a patch... no thanks...

        and your 4 year old copy of office is still very vulnerable, even if you've applied every patch released for it... it is only a matter of time to find the vulnerabilities that have not been patched...

        i've worked with embedded applications before, and while they were very stable, they were also isolated from attack in general.

        there are multiple types of bugs, for the most part, isolated embedded systems need only worry about general operation bugs. the input and output are essentially known to be clean to begin with. non-isolated systems also need be concerned with the myriad of bugs that attackers exploit, most often concerning dirty input of some form.

        as a reference, i have supported a Land Surveryor's CAD system for more than 10 years. the system runs Windows '98, and i've never bothered updating it, nor running antivirus on it. at the same time, it is connected only to printers, and all data brought into it from the outside world is sanitized first. new files are received via email, scanned at 3 different levels in the email chain, saved to a Zip drive, and the Zip drive transfered to the CAD system. if a virus can get through all 3 scanners in the email chain, an antivirus on a non-connected system won't have updates to catch it either...
        erik.soderquist
      • RE: Kaspersky: Trying to keep one step ahead of the Internet's bad guys

        erik,

        > and when a bug is found in the code, you then have to
        > remove and replace a ROM chip rather than apply a patch...
        > no thanks...

        This can happen and it would be a problem, but again, that's what testing is all about. The larger the production numbers, the more complex the software is, the more testing is required. After the testing, it's still possible that someone will find a bug, but it would most likely be a very obscure bug, difficult to reproduce. So yes, burning to ROM has inherent risk, but clearly the current approach does as well. As with so many things in life, it's all about risk management.

        > and your 4 year old copy of office is still very vulnerable,
        > even if you've applied every patch released for it...

        You're describing the current system, where nearly all of the patches are to fix security vulnerabilities. If the program is in ROM, you no longer need to worry about malicious code modifying the executables. You're making MY argument.

        gary
        gdstark13
      • not really making your argument

        @gdstark13

        so far i have yet to see a testing suit that can fully test every possible scenario, if there were, we would see far fewer bugs in released software...

        i find certain assumptions disconcerting. in this case, that finding and exploiting a vulnerability requires modifying the executable file.

        i have seen several exploits that don't, but are still very effective at their goals. a broad change to a ROM based system would mean that malicious attackers would plan for that. it would also mean that vulnerable systems would be less likely to be patched against these vulnerabilities since patching would require opening the case and changing a physical component.

        what i have seen time and again that most people don't seem to grasp is that no matter what major shift was made, as long as there was a profit to be made, the bad guys will find a way to make it.

        in the case of switching to a ROM based system, that was tried with routers, and it was found that routers that were compromised and then rebooted got re-compromised within hours in many cases. the details involved in one i directly handled included the malicious code calling home periodically. when it missed a checking, it was attacked again. that router was replaced with one that could be updated quite quickly, and the decision made to avoid routers that could not be updated.

        in case you were wondering, the "it can't be modified by an attack" is what sold a non-tech exec... i was against it and was overruled. when the router was compromised the first time and the reboot cleared the compromise, he was a bit smug... when we were rebooting it twice daily because it was getting reinfected that quickly and we couldn't update it to eliminate the vulnerability, he changed his mind...

        is there a case for ROM systems? certainly. i use them frequently myself. but i don't think they belong anywhere they can be attacked.
        erik.soderquist
      • RE: Kaspersky: Trying to keep one step ahead of the Internet's bad guys

        erik,

        > so far i have yet to see a testing suit that can fully test
        > every possible scenario, if there were, we would see far
        > fewer bugs in released software...

        You're right....you can't fully test every possible scenario with complex software. The proper question to ask is "can you test & debug to the point of creating a stable product". My experience is that you can.

        > i find certain assumptions disconcerting. in this case, that
        > finding and exploiting a vulnerability requires modifying the
        > executable file.

        Clearly there are other dangers, even if the code is protected. Your data could be compromised. I didn't claim that protecting the code solves all problems. But my own experience in IT shows me that MOST of the problems involve malicious code being installed onto client computers. Is your experience different?

        > i have seen several exploits that don't, but are still very effective at their goals.

        Can you elaborate?

        > what i have seen time and again that most people don't
        > seem to grasp is that no matter what major shift was
        > made, as long as there was a profit to be made, the bad
        > guys will find a way to make it.

        I don't get this....is it your conclusion that we shouldn't try to make comptuters more secure because there are badguys? I agree that there will always be badguys, but forcing them to seek greener pastures is still better than giving in.

        On your router example, I don't understand your point. If it's ROM based, what do you mean by "compromised"?

        > because it was getting reinfected

        So malicious code was installed? You can't physically override ROM remotely, so I don't understand your example.

        > but i don't think they belong anywhere they can be attacked.

        So what's your solution the the mess we're in? How would you prevent malicious code from infecting personal computers? Do you expect Microsoft to suddently have better coders than the badguys? Or have you essentially given up and resigned yourself to unstable computers?

        gary
        gdstark13
      • ROM systems

        @gdstark13

        > You're right....you can't fully test every possible scenario with complex
        > software. The proper question to ask is "can you test & debug to the
        > point of creating a stable product". My experience is that you can.

        stable yes, invulnerable, no. and without the ability to update the code when a vulnerability is found, the vulnerability remains

        >> i find certain assumptions disconcerting. in this case, that
        >> finding and exploiting a vulnerability requires modifying the
        >> executable file.

        > Clearly there are other dangers, even if the code is protected.
        > Your data could be compromised. I didn't claim that protecting
        > the code solves all problems. But my own experience in IT
        > shows me that MOST of the problems involve malicious code
        > being installed onto client computers. Is your experience different?

        yes and no... currently the vector is the most commonly used as the majority of computers support installing programs to computer. on devices that don't support such installations, a different design is used so installations aren't required

        >> i have seen several exploits that don't, but are still very effective at their goals.

        > Can you elaborate?

        i thought providing an example was elaborating...

        >> what i have seen time and again that most people don't
        >> seem to grasp is that no matter what major shift was
        >> made, as long as there was a profit to be made, the bad
        >> guys will find a way to make it.

        > I don't get this....is it your conclusion that we shouldn't
        > try to make computers more secure because there are
        > badguys? I agree that there will always be badguys, but
        > forcing them to seek greener pastures is still better than
        > giving in.

        i don't say we shouldn't try to beat the bad guys. however, i often see things like ROM based systems offered seemingly as a panacea for the problem. also: if all personal computers used a ROM based system, there wouldn't be greener pastures as such since everyone would again be using the same structure. however, it would be a good deal more difficult to capture a sampling of the malicious code as there would no longer be copy on the hard drive (no hard drive at all) to analyze or submit to an anti-virus house for analysis.

        > On your router example, I don't understand your point.
        >If it's ROM based, what do you mean by "compromised"?

        at some point the system code must be loaded from the ROM to run. configuration for the router was also loaded from a read only device. however, the running code was broken into because someone found and exploited a vulnerability in it, and we were not able to update because it was a ROM based system.

        >> because it was getting reinfected

        >So malicious code was installed? You can't physically
        >override ROM remotely, so I don't understand your
        >example.

        malicious code was injected into the running system, with no changes made to the ROM. once the router was rebooted, the original ROM was reloaded and the router was "clean" again, but the attacker's dial home code didn't check in so the router was attacked and the malicious code injected again within hours.

        in this specific case, the malicious code intercepted and modified on the fly DNS queries, returning the IP address of a site designed to mimic bank and credit card sites to steal logins and passwords. it may have done other things as well, this was the specific symptom we found and watched for to know when the router was compromised again. each time it happened, all DNS servers company wide had their caches purged and the router was rebooted again

        >> but i don't think they belong anywhere they can be attacked.

        > So what's your solution the the mess we're in? How
        > would you prevent malicious code from infecting personal
        > computers? Do you expect Microsoft to suddently have
        > better coders than the badguys? Or have you essentially
        > given up and resigned yourself to unstable computers?

        i didn't say i had a solution... if i had a real solution, the world would have beaten a path to my door already.

        my point was that ROM based systems on a wide scale would likely not help in the short term, and looking more at it, i believe ROM based systems on a wide scale would actually hinder our ability to fight the bad guys as we would be denying ourselves the nimbleness and flexibility needed to remove vulnerabilities quickly when they are discovered.

        most people's experience with ROM based systems is for specific applications and in a secure walled garden. i've personally seen only two ROM based systems in places where they could be attacked, and both were compromised and exploited, and the only "fix" was to replace them with something that could be updated.

        a ROM based system also makes it more difficult for people to install and play the latest games, get the newest features, etc... the evolution of html would would quickly cripple systems that couldn't be updated.
        erik.soderquist
      • RE: Kaspersky: Trying to keep one step ahead of the Internet's bad guys

        erik,

        A system that loads the code from ROM to RAM isn't what I'm proposing, for the very reasons you described (it can be compromised). When you run directly out of ROM (which you can definitely do - I've done it), you no longer have a system that allows the code to be modified. Code security achieved.

        Once you have such a system, the only concern left is that data can be deleted, but that's already the case and the solution is the same as before - backups.

        > it would be a good deal more difficult to capture a sampling
        > of the malicious code as there would no longer be copy on
        > the hard drive (no hard drive at all) to analyze or submit to
        > an anti-virus house for analysis.

        Anti-virus? What anti-virus? You don't need an anti-virus software on a system that excludes virus via hardware protect. So that point simply doesn't hold. I somehow doubt people will miss their AV software poping up windows all over the place.

        > a ROM based system also makes it more difficult for people
        > to install and play the latest games,

        For the average mom & pop user, or business, they would gladly forgo the ability to play the latest games downloade off the internet. For those users that need this, a hybrid system could easily be designed...allowing specific programs to run out of RAM. Those willing to take a chance with downloaded code could then do so. Problem solved.

        gary
        gdstark13
      • hybrids needed

        @gdstark13 <br><br>erik,<br><br>>When you run directly out of ROM<br><br>so i have to get a new ROM every time my ISP changes my IP address or their DNS servers... <br><br>>Anti-virus? What anti-virus? You don't<br>>need an anti-virus software on a system<br>>that excludes virus via hardware protect.<br>>So that point simply doesn't hold. I<br>>somehow doubt people will miss their AV<br>>software poping up windows all over the place.<br><br>somewhere along the line, every system with any flexibility must process code in RAM. i'll grant i have absolutely no worries about my daughter's calculator getting a virus, but it's limit is very basic math. even simple subnet masking calculations deal with numbers larger than it can handle.<br><br>the nearest i've been able to come to this is custom live CDs, and it has always been a balancing act between what code do i include and what do i exclude.<br><br>>> a ROM based system also makes it more difficult for people<br>>> to install and play the latest games,<br><br>> For the average mom & pop user, or business, they would gladly<br>> forgo the ability to play the latest games downloade off the<br>> internet. For those users that need this, a hybrid system could<br>> easily be designed...allowing specific programs to run out of RAM.<br>> Those willing to take a chance with downloaded code could then<br>> do so. Problem solved.<br><br>businesses, sure, behind a strong, active firewall. and even then most likely as dumb terminals connecting to a well protected host. one of my past jobs was supporting the network and communications for an auto manufacturing supplier, the spec changes to the communications requirements were every couple months, so i'd be burning ROMs there every couple months or putting an intermediary system in place between the user systems and the internet anyway. (to those who are familiar, the company was a tier 2 and 3 direct manufacturing supplier to several tier 1 manufacturers with full EDI communications)<br><br>on the shop floor, where all the users did was access a single application via a telnet session, the live CD actually fit on a floppy disk, and i never had any virus issues with those stations. those i could have easily had boot from a ROM chip and never made changes to, but again they were very very limited in what they could ever do. i used floppy disks because (at the time at least) they were cheaper.<br><br>there are still flaws in many of the key internet protocols/services (*cough DNS cough*), and until all those flaws are fixed (i doubt *all* will ever happen), some ability to update the network stack is needed. otherwise the newest protocol/service fix being implemented is either held up by compatibility needs or these ROM systems drop off the network because their protocol stacks are no longer compatible.<br><br>mom & pop users... maybe, depends on how many of them would assume the machine is broken every time the latest fancy email from their grand kids failed to display correctly or at all. ROM burned with Flash Player 10 when 11/12/13/etc are released? slightly newer video codec for the latest movie? (blu-ray updates anyone?)<br><br>a hybrid, on the other hand, i think is very plausible, and how it is balanced could be determined by what the user needs. for instance, the very easily accessed "hidden restore partition" that has become popular with the manufacturers instead of sending a DVD (come on, how much is the DVD cost really??)... this i think *should* be on a ROM chip as a minimum. i have had a virus infect the files in this hidden partition before.<br><br>going beyond that, someone who only does very basic email and web browsing, i would put the core OS on a ROM, have the updater mechanism include key-signing requirements from the vendor *and* a manual physical "yes allow an update" switch for the network protocol stacks, and general browser updates and extensions similar to firefox's structure, with a system level override option available that basically says "dump browser and reload from ROM? yes/no?" to be able to reset the browser easily<br><br>from there the level of writable vs ROM will vary greatly, depending on risk vs flexibility<br><br> --edit to correct spelling--
        erik.soderquist
      • RE: hybrids needed

        erik,

        > so i have to get a new ROM every time my ISP changes
        > my IP address or their DNS servers...

        So you agree that your daughter's calculater is a suitable program for ROM. How about MS Word? Do you think Word would break because of ISP changes?

        gary
        gdstark13
      • re: hybrids needed

        @gdstark13 <br><br><br>>> so i have to get a new ROM every time my ISP changes<br>>> my IP address or their DNS servers... <br><br>> So you agree that your daughter's calculater<br>> is a suitable program for ROM. How about<br>> MS Word? Do you think Word would break<br>> because of ISP changes?<br><br>because of an ISP change, no, but a purely ROM Word would mean i have to accept whatever default config was present at the burning of the ROM, and could potentially still be vulnerable to compromises. we would likely see a revival of macro virus attacks or something similar. we would also loose the ability to set default preferences even of simple things like line spacing.<br><br>while the system would be cleaned by a reboot, it only takes one shot for such an attack to extract and send personal information, though at the same time, with a pure ROM system, where would that personal information go? how would you set simple user preferences? web browser home pages? password to get into the computer in the first place?<br><br><br><br>i think ultimately you and i do agree that a hybrid would work best, the biggest difference being how much or little should be purely ROM vs writable.
        erik.soderquist
      • user preferences

        erik,<br><br>User preferences are considered data, not code. Preferences would reside on disk (or whatever volatile memory is used). So putting Word into the hardware equivalent of ROM still makes perfect sense, especially when you consider that most people are using versions that are many years old.<br><br>Honestly, the approach of protecting code with hardware is the ONLY way we're going to get stability in the PC.<br><br>gary
        gdstark13
      • RE: Kaspersky: Trying to keep one step ahead of the Internet's bad guys

        @gdstark13

        i disagree, i believe stability is possible without resorting to the inflexibility of ROM. i also believe that malicious coders will find a way to make their attacks even against a ROM based system. they will simply not rely on the mechanisms that a ROM based system would eliminate and take advantage of the fact that ROM based systems very rarely, if ever, get updated.

        i can't say how as i don't know. breaking into ROM based systems is not currently nor has ever been a part of my job. replacing them because they could not be updated has.

        i can say that with the number of bugs found in unique scenarios that vendors probably can't even guess at ahead of time, and the cost associated with trying to preemptively reproduce every possible environment, something as complex as Windows or Linux will likely never truly be bug free. beyond that, i doubt the market would bear the cost of the Q/A to come close to trying the so many combinations for testing.

        i think we would be better served by users actually learning not to be stupid in general ([i]pretty spam! i'll click![/i]) ([i]no, i don't know you, haven't verified your SSL cert, haven't even checked if the page is encrypted, but i'll happily put in my credit card number[/i])

        i honestly don't doubt malicious attackers would quickly find many ways to specifically corrupt the profiles so it forced code to load from the writable region, just from old habits dying hard. after that, the attacks that are more finely tuned to a ROM based target would mature, and we would be back where we are now, still constantly fighting the malicious coders and whatever their most recent attack is.

        it isn't my job to know (or care really) how the attacks would work, only to accept that no matter what changes we make, they will still find a way to attack, and the battle will never be over. knowing that battle will never be over, i prefer a system i can easily patch to eliminate vulnerabilities as they are found and corrected in the code base.


        and we have not even brushed on the fact that the vendors in general, who are dependent on system turnover for their revenue stream, would never consider designing a system that would be expected to last unaltered for years because it would hurt their finance models too much.

        --- Erik
        erik.soderquist
      • RE: Kaspersky: Trying to keep one step ahead of the Internet's bad guys

        erik,<br><br>I can clarify a couple of points...first, you can 100% guarantee that code only executes out of ROM if you wish the design to work that way. It's simple and would never let someone do otherwise without physically modifying the hardware.<br><br>Second, clearly running out of hardware does not preclude other approaches, like social engineering, but those aren't new. They exist and will continue to exist. But there is ZERO doubt that a ROM based system would be more stable. I know that because from an IT perspective a LOT of time is spent in the world recovering from software attacks. Those completely go away. So arguing that attacks would exist is NOT an argument for making the system more stable.<br><br>> i can say that with the number of bugs found in unique<br>> scenarios that vendors probably can't even guess at ahead<br>> of time, and the cost associated with trying to preemptively<br>> reproduce every possible environment<br><br>On the subject of debugging code, clearly complex code will always have bugs. But I've worked on complex coding projects and my personal experience is that a program like word or excel CAN be sufficiently tested as to be practical. It's a simple formula...reliabilty = f( code size, complexity, and hours of testing). Seriously, it's that simple.<br><br>> i believe stability is possible without resorting to the inflexibility of ROM<br><br>So far this belief is not matching reality.<br><br>> i think we would be better served by users actually<br>> learning not to be stupid in general<br><br>And I believe that the customer is always right.<br><br>> would quickly find many ways to specifically corrupt the profiles so it forced code to load from the writable region<br><br>Like I mentioned, this is physically impossible. It's incredibly easy to design hardware to NOT run out of ram. An entry level hardware designer could accomplish this.<br><br>Erik, I spent years working as an embedded systems engineer and I spent a LOT of time working side by side with hardware engineers. I have absolutely no doubt that hardware will be used in the near future just as I've described. I suspect Intel is already investing time into studying this, based in the silly amount of cash they just put out for a substandard AV program. I suppose time will tell. I would also say that, if there's another plan for making the PC more stable, I'd like to hear it. The only other way to keep code from being corrupted would involve running somebody elses code (cloud). But that still strikes me as overkill and as an engineer I always prefer the simplest solution to a problem.<br><br>gary
        gdstark13
    • we can block countries on our servers

      @CobraA1 I used to think like that too and used some features of our server's firewall to block access to our servers via a country code but it really didnt help much bad guys arent going to come to your server or inbox via a direct route they are almost always going to come via a proxy. one of our developers is in China and when she needed access to one of our clients websites we had to remove the block for china from the firewall. So should we block proxied users? not likely, to easy to block legitimate users. it realy does boil down to our OS manhufacturrs to write operating systems and server software that is not vulnerable to stack overflows,malware, botware, zombies, DoS attacks, trojans, Virrii etc etc but then what would tha anti virus makers do? well they could all chew on their thumnbnails... anti virus and pc or mac protection is big business and Im quite sure the anti virus software vendors keep a hacker or cracker or two around just to throw a little warranted FUD at you now and then
      KineticArtist
  • RE: Kaspersky: Trying to keep one step ahead of the Internet's bad guys

    Spellcheck strikes again! In the first sentence, I think you meant "scared" instead of "sacred."
    Flyer22
    • RE: Kaspersky: Trying to keep one step ahead of the Internet's bad guys

      @Flyer22 I hate it when the typo is in the first sentence. Thanks for pointing it out. I've fixed it...
      sldiaz
  • if the topic is true, the listen up. you helped without realizing

    i have info you may need or already have parts. when kasperty 2010 came out, it detected over 60 generic keyloggers when everything else said i was clean. this was fixed by the hackers, but allowed my drivers of graphics/audio/ethernet be updated for the first time in years since i started the fight with the most dangerous hacker ever. this is when i found the irc chatroom and the user aka fernandez bragging about controlling servers. what hasnt been discussed yet is how our graphics memory is the source of the hacker's doorway into our machines using a pixel error. also there are parts of security that has never been protected such as the wireless signals everywhere. i found out my phone system wa used to connect wirelessly to our machines as one connection that the worm and hacker talks to. the other from our hubs.
    antihacker101
  • RE: Kaspersky: Trying to keep one step ahead of the Internet's bad guys

    Kaspersky always be there to be a good hero in this saga of Virus vs Anti virus and i personally always hope that Kaspersky will at least one step ahead of the cyber criminals. Otherwise if the anti-virus software is loosing then we all the ordinary computer users will face the consequences of having virus infection day in day out from using the internet
    antiviruskey