Libraries take a hit from the legacy of Moore's Law

Libraries take a hit from the legacy of Moore's Law

Summary: This just in: A day after Intel said it would offer $10,000 for a copy of a magazine in which Moore's Law was first announced, a University of Illinois engineering library noticed that one of its two copies disappeared...

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TOPICS: Legal
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This just in: A day after Intel said it would offer $10,000 for a copy of a magazine in which Moore's Law was first announced, a University of Illinois engineering library noticed that one of its two copies disappeared...

Topic: Legal

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  • Its sad

    that Libraries will be useless in the all-to-near future. If Google and Wikipedia can't give you anything and everything you ever wanted from a Library (except the "sushhh"), then go ahead and go there.

    Oh yeah, too bad thieves are the only ones with library cards . . .
    Roger Ramjet
    • You can't trust everything you see in Google or Wiki

      Librarians, on the other hand, are trained to weed out the questionable information from thousands of sources (and to know the reliable sources from the unreliable). Plus, most libraries are now more like media centers, where people who don't own computers (at least 50% of households, if the US Census is to be believed) get free or cheap access to a computer with broadband Internet access, Productivity software like Office, and even videoconferencing. Most librarians now are trained in the effective use of Web search engines, and in search engines outside the most popular (Google, etc.) that can provide much more reliable information.

      While libraries will have to continue changing with the times, I doubt they'll ever be "useless". Not until everyone in America has the researching and fact-finding skills of librarians. That will be a long time indeed.
      doctormoriarty