LinkedIn down: Proof that 'the offline problem' needs solving

LinkedIn down: Proof that 'the offline problem' needs solving

Summary: Here's another reason I'd like to see the offline problem solved sooner than later and solved with a technology like JavaDB (Apache Derby) or Flash that can be implemented in thick or thin (well, OK, rich) clients.  It doesn't matter what the reasons for going down are (if it were a planned outage, it would have been nice if I was warned with an email).

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TOPICS: Collaboration
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LinkedInDown.jpg

Here's another reason I'd like to see the offline problem solved sooner than later and solved with a technology like JavaDB (Apache Derby) or Flash that can be implemented in thick or thin (well, OK, rich) clients.  It doesn't matter what the reasons for going down are (if it were a planned outage, it would have been nice if I was warned with an email). The fact that LinkedIn.com was down yesterday is proof that whether the world continues to stay with its largely thick-client architecture or if it moves to something a bit thinner -- perhaps a largely browser-based system that's glorified with Java and Flash -- it still needs a way to continue to work when the services that it's used to reaching become unreachable.

I recevied this notice yesterday after attempting to accept an invitation that I received via email.  The fact that LInkedIn was down really isn't big news to me.  I don't necessarily consider it to be a mission critical application that I can't do without.  But, as I said yesterday, the people who keep saying that thin isn't in seem to be in denial about the number of people that are taking delivery of an increasing percentage of their application functionality through a browser.  At what point will we wake up one day and ask ourselves "So, why do I need all this expensive horsepower on my desktop to run a browser?" 

This said, I do agree with one issue that was raised by one ZDNet reader who dragged the government into the conversation.  The big question being who do you trust to protect your data from the government's prying eyes: yourself or your ASPs?

Topic: Collaboration

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4 comments
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  • At least now they are admitting it!

    LinkedIn has been "sick" since at least May 19. That's when I reported getting messages saying "Access denied due to security policy violation." (I got one of those messages when I tried to report the problem through their internal notification system. Since the customer_service address was nowhere on their Web site, the only address I could use to bring their attention to the problem was business@linkedin.com!) I then heard from Customer Service, and it was clear that they HAD received my first attempt to notify them. However, the system was to broken to let me know this. I then went through several exchanges of answering irrelevant questions, followed by my making blunt statements like, "If you cannot figure out the problem, either escalate the call or cancel my account." I was notified that the call was escalated on June 6 and have heard nothing from them since then. This is not just a case study about "the offline problem;" it also points out another problem with running software through the Internet. <i>You</i> are the one who decides whether or not to make changes to executable code sitting on your hard drive. When you run code on a remote site, you no longer have that luxury. When someone out there decides that the code you have been running needs "improvement," you have no idea whether or not the change will be for the better; but we all know what Murphy's Law predicts!
    kitchen-cynic
  • Make up your mind!

    Do you want thin client computing (the Web as we know it) or thick client computing (traditional client/server architechture)? JavaDB is traditional thick client computing. Heck, the way you described it a few months ago, you wanted to turn the desktop into a miniature sever, with a locally running Web server, application server, and database. All to accomplish what a trational desktop app that hooks into a backend database or server side application does. In fact, the architecture is exactly the same, the difference is the protocols.

    You really need to make up your mind. Everything that you put forth as an advantage of thin computing is lost as soon as you start requiring stuff like JavaDB, Flash, local file access, etc. Talk about wasted horsepower? How about the wasted horsepower to be sticking an entire database (written in Java, no less) on the client? Or the wasted horsepower processing XML files? Or the wasted horsepower doing anything in JavaScript?

    I am truly stunned by your continued inability to grasp these factors, despite all of the comments from myself and others here over the last few years. You obviously choose to listen to the other cheerleaders and marketing executives, and ignore those of us deep in the trenches who have to work with this stuff every day.

    J.Ja
    Justin James
  • Network will not be there everywhere !

    As is the case with mobile applications, which have to rely on some offline content to start making enterprise benefit claims - the web based applications need to have an offline component as well.

    Backweb (www.backweb.com) has a great infrastructure product to offline enable web based applications. Maybe time has come to look at this to ensure that the web based apps are also avaialbe offline. Outlook's biggest advantage over web email is the ability to work when the network is not there. Web platforms give us the ability to work from anywhere - so if we are not carrying a laptop - yes, but what if we are carrying one, and the network is not there. Bingo - time for an application which will "thick clientize" the web app - like backweb.
    s.bapat@...
  • LinkedIn now dead for me too

    This is the first issue I've had with LinkedIn. And this is the only post I have seen that
    references the problem precisely. It's now several months later and I am seeing this
    problem again. Very bad. Same issue from several computers, different (public) IP
    addresses.
    baddog@...