Linus Torvalds summarily rejects GPL 3

Linus Torvalds summarily rejects GPL 3

Summary: Stephen Shankland reports that Linux keyholder Linus Torvalds isn't keen on aligning the kernal with a new, and as yet incomplete, GPL license.  Torvalds said that it is "insane to require people to make their private signing keys available," referring to the anti-DRM element in the GPL 3 draft specification.

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TOPICS: Open Source
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Stephen Shankland reports that Linux keyholder Linus Torvalds isn't keen on aligning the kernal with a new, and as yet incomplete, GPL license.  Torvalds said that it is "insane to require people to make their private signing keys available," referring to the anti-DRM element in the GPL 3 draft specification. More infighting among the Linux stalwarts and the formation of polarized factions will turn the Linux community into open source software version of the Mideast--lots of talk, posturing, and little progress. Lots of discussion on Slashdot. Eweek addresses the complexities of DRM related to the GPL license.

Topic: Open Source

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  • Folks need to come to grips with DRM

    It IS going to happen, even with Linux...
    No_Ax_to_Grind
    • Won't be neccessary

      When the WiMAX Steamroller and Streaming Paradigm shift - DRM will not be neccessary. Streams can be encrypted - so the person that paid will get what they paid for. Using the Streaming Paradigm's CONVENIENCE mantra - why copy variable quality crap (and keep track of it), when you can just go to the portal and get high quality stuff 24/7? DRM morphs into proprietary media players for each portal.
      Roger Ramjet
    • Well Bit

      Folks do not need to come to grips with DRM. In fact if "folks" have a brain they should oppose DRM at every turn. They should demand a different and better solution which does not involve destroying "fair use" provisions in copyright law.

      However I must agree that Stallman is creating a problem by trying to force his agenda through the GPL. We will eventually see a time when Linux kernel code and GPL 3 code will experience strife as attempts are made to combine them.

      Linus' position is well grounded in reality. Stallman is a crusader fighting a good fight the wrong way.
      Tim Patterson
    • Resistance is Futile

      You will be assimilated into the collective?

      So you're not one to take arms against a sea of troubles and, by opposing, end them?

      All that is necessary for evil to triumph is for good people to do nothing.
      marlinj9
  • Where?

    "More infighting among the Linux stalwarts and the formation of
    polarized factions will turn the Linux community into open
    source software version of the Mideast?lots of talk, posturing,
    and little progress."

    Where's this infighting. Your assuming that remaining at version
    2 will create a problem, why would it?

    The point is that Linux can move to GPL v3 with the agreement
    of the copyright holders. If the move is essential, and nobody is
    saying that, the code of copyright holders that insist it remain at
    version 2 would have to be re-written. As Alan Cox pointed out
    his would not be a significant amount of code.

    To reiterate why is moving to GPLv3 an issue anyway?
    Richard Flude
  • I don't see it

    The Linux kernel is SO tightly controlled that DRM code will most likely NEVER enter into it. DRM would be limited to the application stack - not the system stack. So now, WHY does Linus reject it? It won't affect him in the least.
    Roger Ramjet
    • DRM is moving into the kernel and hardware layers

      Unfortunately (or fortunately, depending on where you stand), DRM is quickly moving into the kernel and hardware layer. Look at where Microsoft has been going with the XBox360, the kernel needs to be signed against the hardware, or the hardware won't boot. Intel (and probably AMD) are rapidly building DRM capabilities directly into their CPUs. IBM (as evidences on the XBox 360) has followed suit. Mac OSX on Intels won't run on hardware that doesn't agree with it, which is a form of DRM. I wouldn't be surprised if iPods and other similar products won't force you to register them with content providers to be authorized to play files from your computer. This is where the DRM situation is headed, like it or not.

      In other words, within a few years, Linux and the gang will either have to play nice-nice with the DRM folks, or not be able to use DRMed stuff.

      J.Ja
      Justin James