Microsoft ties a bow around and ships Python language support for .NET (IronPython)

Microsoft ties a bow around and ships Python language support for .NET (IronPython)

Summary: Earlier last month, Ars Technica had a pretty good catch-me-up on the efforts of Sun and Microsoft to introduce "external" dynamic language support to their respective runtime environments Java and .NET (see .

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TOPICS: Open Source
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Earlier last month, Ars Technica had a pretty good catch-me-up on the efforts of Sun and Microsoft to introduce "external" dynamic language support to their respective runtime environments Java and .NET (see .NET and Java to get better dynamic language support). By external, I mean languages that don't come from the company in the first place.  While the Java Runtime Environment is all about Java, the .NET Common Language Runtime has long supported multiple Microsoft languages (ie: Visual Basic and C#).  Ever since Tim Bray joined Sun, he's been publicly discussing other languages in the context of JRE support -- a quest that began around the time "Larry Wall and Dan Sugalski (Perl and Parrot), Guido van Rossum, Samuele Pedroni and Sean McGrath (Python), and James Strachan (Groovy)" were invited back in '04 to a summit at Sun's campus in the valley to discuss "Dynamic Java."

In a bit of a stab at Sun, Ars Technica's Ryan Paul wrote (in the aforelinked article):

In an uncharacteristically perceptive statement from Sun, Sun Computational Theologist Gilad Bracha admits, "It has come to our attention that some people want to program in things other than Java."

More recently (aka: today), Bray has been spending his blog text on Ruby and more specifically JRuby. According to the JRuby home page on Codehaus, "JRuby is an 100% pure-Java implementation of the Ruby programming language." Earlier this year however, during JavaOne, Sun unveiled Phobos, a technology focused at scripting server-side Java with Javascript (Server-side Javascript [sic]? Talk about 'yer resurrections). 

Meanwhile, Microsoft has been on its own quest to add support for an incredibly popular scripting language -- Python -- to the .NET engine.  Earlier this year, in January, Microsoft released the first beta of its IronPython offering and with today comes news that IronPython has officially shipped. Standing somewhat in contrast to the open source licenses that are typically applied to Python-related technologies, the Release 1.0 Production version of IronPython is available under Microsoft's shared-source license

Topic: Open Source

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  • Score one for Dynamic Scripting Languages

    Well, hats off to MS for IronPython.

    Of course, it's nothing new though.

    Dynamic scripting is 'a given' for internet web programmers who use Perl, Ruby, PHP, Python.

    In the long run, one has to wonder what effect IronPython will have on 'divergent' standards--you know the story with MS with the SUN Java VM and how that played out.

    IronPython represents more than just having a wrapper around the .NET framework.

    Certainly, IronPython, by the looks of recent feeds on [url=http://weblog.infoworld.com/udell/2006/09/06.html#a1519]Jon's Radio[/url] will ease rapid prototyping and reinforce that Dynamic scripting languages are well worth the consideration for utilizing in a wide range of small to large scale IT projects.

    It's just another day in the Dynamic scripting tooterville--nothing new here--moving on. ;)
    D T Schmitz
  • Eh.

    I downloaded the IronPython release last night. Unfortunately, from what I can tell, it does not integrate into Visual Studio. So yes, the IronPython experience will be no worse than coding in a standard text editor and running from a command line... but that just does not cut it in the .Net world. Once you've moved to Visual Studio, or another IDE with the same level of quality, it is really hard to justify going back. The productivity gains from a great IDE often offset any productivity losses from a dog language like VB.Net. While I will be given IronPython a more in depth look soon, lack of Visual Studio support is going to hurt it really badly.

    J.Ja
    Justin James
    • You are mistaken

      http://blogs.msdn.com/aaronmar/archive/2006/02/16/533273.aspx

      An experimental form of IronPython integration for Visual Studio .Net 2005 is already available as a code sample in the Visual Studio SDK. This allows you to create VS projects in Python; the forms designer even emits Python code.
      lordbrutish