Nokia chief outlines Windows Phone strategy; warns of Android 'uncertainty'

Nokia chief outlines Windows Phone strategy; warns of Android 'uncertainty'

Summary: Nokia's Stephen Elop discussed at an event in China the possible difficulties for Android that the Motorola-Google deal may bring, while defending Microsoft's Windows Phone 7.

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Nokia chief Stephen Elop, in a speech in China, outlined the release strategy for the upcoming Windows Phone-powered Nokia smartphones.

Elop, who shortly after he was appointed soon after leaving Microsoft, steered the Nokia smartphone ship from Symbian to Microsoft's next-generation mobile operating system, discussed the rumours that Microsoft would eventually acquire Nokia.

It would not come as a shock to many, since Google acquired the handset-making arm of Motorola, but appears to have been ruled out -- for now.

But Elop said that Nokia would make its own way "independently", as the phone giant is set to release its first Windows Phone 7-powered phone before the end of year.

Microsoft's relationship with Nokia is unique, in that the software and operating system giant gave Nokia complete access to Windows Phone 7 source code; something that other Microsoft partners, such as HTC and Samsung, which have not been given the keys.

Nokia is also sharing a great deal with Microsoft for the Windows Phone project to go ahead, including key services and "innovations" to help differentiate Windows Phone running Nokia devices from the other Windows Phone devices on the market.

But as Elop was keen to point out the advantages of Windows Phone over Android, he warned that the Motorola-Google deal, announced last month, could cause difficulties in the forward strategy of the Android ecosystem.

He said that for other manufacturers, such as HTC and Samsung, there will be considerations to take into account as to how the Motorola-Google deal will affect Android allegiances.

Also, Nokia's overall ethos is changing, with a reported higher sense of urgency and "more aggressive decision making" to enable better innovation.

"It creates a great deal of uncertainty for the Android ecosystem. I'm sure it is of great concern for many of the Android participants", he said in the speech.

The problem of the dilution of phones was also highlighted -- with seemingly every phone for every available segment of all markets it pitches toward -- the balance needs to set to enable phones for all kinds of customer, without flooding the market with forgettable phones.

Bets are on that Nokia Maps will be ported to Nokia Windows Phone devices, perhaps with some 'Bing-ification' to go with it. It just wouldn't be right if Microsoft would not insist on throwing Bing in with something; whether it fits or not.

And, as seen with other Windows Phone devices, such as those from HTC, Nokia is also moving towards a "form factor" model with "distinct designs".

Though there was no mention of a tablet, the phone giant is "aware of the need" and opportunity to meet consumer demands. With Microsoft's cosy relationship with Nokia, I would not put it past either of them to consider a Windows 8 'slate' device -- if a tablet were to come to fruition next year.

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Topics: Mobility, Android, Google, Microsoft, Nokia

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  • Choice

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    Your Non Advocate
    • RE: Nokia chief outlines Windows Phone strategy; warns of Android 'uncertainty'

      @facebook@...
      Microsoft rocks!
      LoverockDavidsonn
      • RE: Nokia chief outlines Windows Phone strategy; warns of Android 'uncertainty'

        @LoverockDavidsonn <br>Umm. Let's see.... This guy WAS a microsoft employee, right? (x) check.<br>NOW works for NOKIA, right (x) check. So we EXPECT genuine openness about him, in favor of WHOM?? Android??
        roger.es
    • RE: Nokia chief outlines Windows Phone strategy; warns of Android 'uncertainty'

      @facebook@...
      Apparently paying off hardware manufacturers so they only use your software rather than use WP7 and android = choice.
      anono
      • RE: Nokia chief outlines Windows Phone strategy; warns of Android 'uncertainty'

        @anono I believe you missed the point. According to many on here, the more Windows Phone only OEMs the better. THey could care less about your choice, as long as they get their choice.
        Rick_Kl
  • RE: Nokia chief outlines Windows Phone strategy; warns of Android 'uncertainty'

    A good CEO can spot when its competition is in danger and take advantage of the situation. That is what we have here. Elop sees android is in trouble with both the legal aspect and with Google isolating themselves to just Motorola. There is no second guessing as to why WP7 was the right choice for Nokia. Prepare for more stories about android getting dumped and WP7 getting picked up.
    LoverockDavidson_-24231404894599612871915491754222
    • RE: Nokia chief outlines Windows Phone strategy; warns of Android 'uncertainty'

      @LoverockDavidson_ And the FUD machine keeps on churning...
      chipbeef
      • RE: Nokia chief outlines Windows Phone strategy; warns of Android 'uncertainty'

        @chipbeef
        True that. But this FUD may be more justified than some others.

        Google will work out the Android kinks eventually. But over the near term, there is undoubtedly reason to be fearful, uncertain, and doubtful about how much money there is to be made there.
        x I'm tc
      • RE: Nokia chief outlines Windows Phone strategy; warns of Android 'uncertainty'

        @chipbeef LD is correct. I predicted from the get-go that someday there would be a life-size, solid gold statue of Stephen Elop in Nokia HQ, and my prediction is looking to be right on track.
        jgm@...
      • RE: Nokia chief outlines Windows Phone strategy; warns of Android 'uncertainty'

        @jgm@

        If there will be one it will not be pure gold. It will be not revered. It wll be for shaming Nokia for bringing it from a Telephone giant to MS stooge status.
        Van Der
      • RE: Nokia chief outlines Windows Phone strategy; warns of Android 'uncertainty'

        @jgm@...
        We can all pretend to know the future about whether Elop's strategy will succeed or not. Given Nokia's share price though, investors have spoken.
        anono
    • RE: Nokia chief outlines Windows Phone strategy; warns of Android 'uncertainty'

      @LoverockDavidson_

      Do you have a new handle with the underline character?
      DonRupertBitByte
      • RE: Nokia chief outlines Windows Phone strategy; warns of Android 'uncertainty'

        @DonRupertBitByte
        Yep.
        LoverockDavidson_-24231404894599612871915491754222
      • RE: Nokia chief outlines Windows Phone strategy; warns of Android 'uncertainty'

        @DonRupertBitByte
        What???
        LoverockDavidsonn
    • RE: Nokia chief outlines Windows Phone strategy; warns of Android 'uncertainty'

      @LoverockDavidson_

      LOL! That's ridiculously funny. Ahem...Google just gave HTC a bunch of patents to counter-sue Apple.

      That reaction by Elop, curiously a repeated attempt at FUD from the day they announced the Microsoft-Nokia partnership, is probably all bravado. Nothing could make Nokia more afraid, than Google giving out patents in which to force Microsoft, Nokia, Apple and others to cross-patent.

      Suddenly, Nokia's perceived advantage is just a footnote...HTC, Samsung and others who are developing for Android and WP7 are at a strong advantage over Nokia. With the newest US JD Power and Associates smartphone satisfaction rankings showing Nokia dead last, who do you think should be running scared?

      I think Elop is running scared as hell right now.
      gork platter
      • the only problem with android

        @gork platter is that there is nothing compelling to hold users to the Android platform.

        My guess is that Google will end up settling with Oracle and license any relevant technology. Android will then just continue on. There is no uncertainty.
        otaddy
    • RE: Nokia chief outlines Windows Phone strategy; warns of Android 'uncertainty'

      @LoverockDavidson_

      A good CEO can spot when his own company is in danger . . .

      The more Elop goes on pushing WP7 the more it seems like his in trouble.

      If WP7 was so good why didn't it sell before?

      Why does MS need to spend millions training sellers how to use it?

      Why does Elop plan to lower the price point and try and flood the market?

      Nokia choice of WP7 was right for MS.
      bobhyde
  • RE: Nokia chief outlines Windows Phone strategy; warns of Android 'uncertainty'

    It's much easier to talk about uncertainty of your competitor than it is to talk about certainty of your company/product. The latter he can't do.<br><br>
    Return_of_the_jedi
    • RE: Nokia chief outlines Windows Phone strategy; warns of Android 'uncertainty'

      @Return_of_the_jedi

      "Android Nears 50% Market Share," and still no one is reaping all that much in the way of profits from it. Enough to be a major force, sure, but not, maybe, enough to support another giant like Nokia entering the game.

      Nokia is set to be the preeminent supplier of a product backed by the preeminent software company in the world. They could well go down in a fireball -- but that was going to happen anyway.

      Motorola "bet the company" on Android and did okay for a stint. Nokia is making a similar bet. I don't have a crystal ball and I don't know that they are likely to succeed. But the opportunity is there if the stars align. If this bet just so much as stops the bleeding, I think it will be considered a great move by the punditocracy.

      If you are a betting man, now might be the time to buy Nokia.
      x I'm tc
      • RE: Nokia chief outlines Windows Phone strategy; warns of Android 'uncertainty'

        @jdakula

        I think fear comes from the smaller profits. It's easier to fight legal battles if you're raking in the money, if that profit margin isn't there and you start paying licensing fees, and Google services fees, that adds up. Not leaving a whole lot of meat on the bones. In comparison it seems WP7 is cheap compared to the free Android.
        LiquidLearner