NPD: Apple continued to dominate mobile PC shipments in Q1

NPD: Apple continued to dominate mobile PC shipments in Q1

Summary: Apple manages to keep beating the competition in the mobile PC market mainly thanks to just one type of device (a tablet) and one brand (iPad).

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TOPICS: Mobility, Apple, Hardware
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Apple continued to have a firm grip over the worldwide mobile PC market through the first quarter of 2012, according to NPD DisplaySearch.

The mobile PC sector includes includes notebooks and netbooks, which offers more potential to capture the lead for brands with diversified portfolios.

However, Apple manages to keep beating the competition in this market mainly thanks to just one type of device (a tablet) and one brand (iPad). Apple shipped 17.2 million mobile PC units during the first quarter, granting it 22.5 percent of the market share.

That's nearly twice than Hewlett-Packard's showing at 11.6 percent. Rounding out the top five were Acer, Lenovo and Dell, respectively.

When you break it down between netbooks and notebooks on one side and tablets on another, HP fares far better with 16.2 percent of the market for the top spot in this arena. Acer trails in second place at just under 12 percent, followed by Lenovo, Dell and Asus.

Apple's real strength shines in the tablet-only category, where it still maintains control over half the global market with 62.8 percent. Samsung is a very distant second place at 7.5 percent.

But keep an eye on Amazon, which is hopping around in the top five after just a couple of quarters with just one device and one brand of its own: the Kindle Fire.

Of course, Apple might want to relish everything about its crown while it can. Although it's a way bit down the road, NPD reported earlier this month that the iPad maker will lose about a quarter of the tablet market within the next five years.

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Topics: Mobility, Apple, Hardware

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13 comments
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  • What a strange "summary"

    "Apple manages to keep beating the competition in the mobile PC market mainly thanks to just one type of device (a tablet) and one brand (iPad)."

    It sounds as strange as [i]"HP manages to come in second place in the mobile PC market mainly thanks to just one type of device (a notebook) and one brand (Pavillion)"[/i] would sound.
    DDERSSS
    • Except for the fact the HP statement isn't true

      They have the MiniBook line, the ENVY line, ProBook line and Folio line. Mixed across those brands, you have netbooks, traditional laptops, ultrabooks and even the ultrabook knockoff, the "SleekBook".

      Probably even less true with the other OEMs since most of them are offering some sort of tablet line. It has to be only a matter of time until HP steps back into the tablet space. I can't see them sitting back and watching all the other OEMs fight for the Win8 tablet marketshare regardless of what they said about tablets when they exited the market.

      That being said, while most of Apple's mobile PC sales are iPads, I think the statement is a bit misleading given the popularity of the MBA. Again, I know iPad sales likely dwarf MBA, but given the push by Intel and all it's OEMs to mimic the MBA, it's hard to argue it's not a success and contributor.
      TroyMcClure
      • Except for HP statement is true

        Pavillion TM is by far the biggest TM in their notebook sales.
        DDERSSS
  • I expect Apple's tablet market share to go poof!

    [i]Although its a way bit down the road, NPD reported earlier this month that the iPad maker will lose about a quarter of the tablet market within the next five years.[/i]

    If Apple manages to retain as much as 50% of the tablet / hybrid market share by the end of 2013, I'd truly be shocked. Windows 8 should quickly shrink the iPad's market share.

    Windows 8's marketing campaign should be summed up in one word: touch. (Please MS, no obtuse ads!) Windows 8 ads should just show users interacting with a variety of computers using touch. The main focus of the ads should be touch interactions with computers by people, and a sizable portion of the time spent in ads, should show actual touch interactions with PCs - very similar to what Apple does. MS, simply show touch interactions with PCs, and humanize them with people. Do this in consumer and business settings, showing both consumption and productivity scenarios on Windows 8 PCs.

    The following ad could be used as a starting point:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_53dvndkcrY
    P. Douglas
    • Keep Dreaming

      Windows 8 and it's FUGLY Metro UI will be a flop the likes of which MS has not seen in a long time.

      There is no reason to go from what you know (iOS/iPad) to some junky 1/2 baked Microsoft experiment. That theory is already being proven with Windows Phone 7 and it's [b]declining market share[/b]
      itguy10
      • I have to agree

        Windows 8 is so arsenic backwards that the average user will be confused by the changes without training.
        slickjim
      • Wah, wah, wah!

        @Peter Perry,

        I can see how things will be truly baffling for new users. [i]Swipe from the sides (including top and bottom) to access controls when using touch, or move your pointer to the corners to access controls when using a mouse.[/i] I see where the above one sentence instructions will be too much for most people to handle.

        I find it so astounding how many power users are so averse to change. The situation is so remarkably similar to when MS switched away from DOS to Windows.
        P. Douglas
    • Don't know...

      Certainly they need to highlight touch, but it's not exactly a differentiator at this point of the game. If anything, it could have the reverse effect that MS is showing up way late to the game (the average consumer is oblivious to the existence of WP7). I think they really need to focus on "this isn't your grandfather's Windows" but at the same time get across that Win8 has integration with your grandfather's windows, XBOX, your PC at work, etc.

      Quite honestly, the drastic UI differences in Win8 would have been the perfect opportunity to retire the Windows brand (as of Win7), at least on the end user side, and start fresh, not unlike what Apple did with OS X.

      That being said, while I see some potential on the phone/tablet side, after seeing Win8 Preview/Metro on a desktop, I personally think it's horrific.
      TroyMcClure
      • Be careful

        The [b]Angry Minion of Microsoft[/b] will descend on you and vote your opinion into oblivion...
        Jumpin Jack Flash
    • The only problem with that is...

      You'd have to have all your devices come from Microsoft, which would give them too much access to your personal information. I do not want any company having that much detail on my personal life, Not Apple, Google, Microsoft, Sony etc. There is no need for them (any one of them) to have that much access to my life. I want the ability to be anonymous when it suits me. It's like the nightmare world in Minority Report, where no matter where you go, you're being tracked. I don't care if you're willing to accept that world, I don't want any part of it!

      You also should check out this spin on big*ss tables
      http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=endscreen&NR=1&v=CZrr7AZ9nCY
      Jumpin Jack Flash
    • Nice Hardware

      I wonder when Samsung is going to put Android on it...?
      z2217
    • Certainly true...

      just as it was the last time MS released a product into this space, the time before, ... ;-)
      Richard Flude
    • Wow, you're more optimistic than even Microsoft is

      "If Apple manages to retain as much as 50% of the tablet / hybrid market share by the end of 2013, I'd truly be shocked."-P. Douglas

      Wow. I don't think even Microsoft is as optimistic about their sales in 2013 as you are.

      Windows 8 has a lot of unanswered questions. But the least of their worries is marketing. People who don't understand Apple give their marketing way too much credit for their success. Apple DOES have great marketing. But marketing only gets your foot in the door. The product makes the sale and makes the re-sale.

      I don't have as much faith as you do that Microsoft will successfully answer all the questions it faces with a resounding "Yes" but I'm willing to wait and see. As for marketing, yes, good marketing will help. But it will only help if the product is a good one.
      Falkirk